Combatting begging and how to avoid repeating commands. help!
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Thread: Combatting begging and how to avoid repeating commands. help!

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    twsnow18 is offline Member
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    PostCombatting begging and how to avoid repeating commands. help!

    I have three questions about some obedience things. Tucker is about 12 weeks.

    1). I know your not supposed to repeat commands, but what I do I do if Tucker does not come the first time he's called or sit on the first command etc.? I try to go get him when he does not obey "come" but he will try to run from me.

    2). When I'm eating dinner on the couch Tucker comes up and sits likes hes waiting for a treat or he sniffs up real close to my plate. Is the best way to just be consistent and say "no!" or is it better to just ignore him?

    3). Is he too young to teach heel? When I walk him he likes to explore and check out/sniff everything. I let him socialize and stuff so when should I really begin to crack down on "heel" as he is only 3 months?

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    MicksMom is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by twsnow18 View Post
    ....
    1). I know your not supposed to repeat commands, but what I do I do if Tucker does not come the first time he's called or sit on the first command etc.? I try to go get him when he does not obey "come" but he will try to run from me...
    Hhmm trying to remember how I did this. Instead of teaching "Come", we taught what we called "Puppy recalls"- simply call Tucker in a happy voice, and treat him when he comes to you. You might have to call out his name more than once in the beginning. A good first step to "Puppy Recall" is something a lot of people take for granted that their dog knows- their name. With Tucker sitting with you, say his name (once). When he looks at you, give him a treat.


    Quote Originally Posted by twsnow18 View Post
    ....
    2). When I'm eating dinner on the couch Tucker comes up and sits likes hes waiting for a treat or he sniffs up real close to my plate. Is the best way to just be consistent and say "no!" or is it better to just ignore him?
    ...
    Caleb was put an x pen where he could see us when we ate. He got to the point that he ran into the pen on his own when he heard me say "Dinner". At that point, I left the door to the pen open. Once he was reliable at knowing "Down", he was allowed in the diningroom while we ate. We don't eat at the table that much anymore, but the "root lesson" has taken hold, and Caleb will lay down in the livingroom or where ever we're eating.

    Quote Originally Posted by twsnow18 View Post
    ....
    3). Is he too young to teach heel? When I walk him he likes to explore and check out/sniff everything. I let him socialize and stuff so when should I really begin to crack down on "heel" as he is only 3 months?
    You can start now- I simply said "Good heel" when Caleb put himself in heel position. At 3 months, you can kind of lure him into walking in heel position with a treat. But only do it for a few steps (3-5), give him the treat and "release" him for a while.

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    lab fan is offline Senior Member
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    We worked on heeling yesterday at puppy school - walk with your puppy off leash beside you. Have a bunch of small treats in your left hand, and dog on your left side. Take about 4 steps and tell puppy to sit. Give her the treat, then start walking, telling her to sit every 4 steps. After a couple of tries, all of the puppies were walking right beside their owners, eyes fixed on the owners eyes. It was very impressive!! Lucy and I practiced a couple of times at home today, and she seems to have really understood the drill. We were told getting the dogs to sit often while you are walking will get the dogs to focus on the owners, and heel right beside you.

    In terms of recall, I have been using really yummy liver treats (really small pieces) that Lucy only gets when I call her to come. So far she has been pretty good about coming when called. My daughter plays a game in the house where she will go hide and calls Lucy to come. The treats are a huge incentive - even if it is a really small piece.

    Tilly, Feb.11, 2003
    Lucy, Oct. 24, 2010

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    twsnow18 is offline Member
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    Ok I'll give that a try tomorrow when I walk him. Should I be worried about giving him treats too much I feel like I spoil the crap out of him. Do you personally give a treat every time she sits or lays down while training?

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    kaytris is offline Senior Member
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    He's a baby still - you have to keep your training sessions short, sweet and fun, setting up the situation so that he has no opportunity BUT to do what you want, paired with lots of positive rewards (whether that is food, treats, toys, praise, physical affection, or an opportunity to do whatever he loves most). If you start correcting him now, you may have a dog that listens but you won't have a willing, joyful partner.

    For a recall, I would start inside with a less stimulating environment, call him the one time, then follow that with handclapping and pats and lots of enthusiastic praise as you briskly move away .. when he reaches you, praise him to high heaven and reward reward reward.

    This is my favourite recall exercise, the restrained recall:
    YouTube - Restrained Recalls
    Last edited by kaytris; 01-31-2011 at 11:48 PM. Reason: edited with better video

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    brody is offline Senior Member
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    set yourself and pup up for success- don't call him when he's unikely to come
    and yes one "sit" (if he knows the cue) and wait him out
    ignore him when you eat or give him something else to do - my dogs often get a treat of their own to work on while we eat -- they learn to simply lie around the floor while we have a meal
    formal obedience heel may be a bit much but you should be able to work on a lovely attentive loose leash walk

    I'm with kaytris
    SHORT SWEET SESSIONS work best
    http://andrea-agilityaddict.blogspot.com/

    “I am only one, but still I am one. I cannot do everything, but still I can do something; and because I cannot do everything, I will not refuse to do something that I can do.” H. Keller

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    twsnow18 is offline Member
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    Alright thanks for the information. The first three weeks he was home I was treating him like crazy and he was much more reliable with his commands I was just worried that I was treating him too much so I slowed it down for the last week and a half or so and he has been much more reluctant. At what point in time or age do you start correcting when they disobbey sit or come or laydown etc.? So it's not a big deal and I can wean him off treats later correct?

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    lab fan is offline Senior Member
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    With the recall outside , I do treat almost everytime - if not a really small treat, then lots of petting and good girls. I really want her to understand that when I call her to come, she comes right away. Our training sessions are really short (3 mins. maybe 3 times a day). Since I break the treats into really small pieces, I am not too worried about over treating her.

    Tilly, Feb.11, 2003
    Lucy, Oct. 24, 2010

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    windycanyon is offline Senior Member
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    Dont call him unless you are 100% he'll come the first time and he's on a long line (and if not, you can go to him and get his collar on the 2nd command and show him what you want). Use his "lunch" kibble as training treats at this age. Make him work for his lunch, iow. Dont' make a big deal out of it. Puppies don't understand rational discussions. Just say "Puppy Come". if no response, go to him and say "Puppy-- Come!" yes!!!! good boy!!!! treat.

    Don't eat where he can get at your plate or be willing to step on his back toes to discourage his begging/bad behavior.

    Heeling absolutely can be taught by luring to begin with. If you start by only rewarding at Front (for come) and at Heel, those will always be default positions of safety. I'd not be quick to put a name to the Heel though as it won't sink in for awhile.

    Go to an obed class for gosh sakes! Puppy K is great! Have fun. This is the most fun stage of dog training imo. Anne

    WindyCanyon Girls, August 2014

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