Too much Coddling Puppy?
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Thread: Too much Coddling Puppy?

  1. #1
    GoPotty's Avatar
    GoPotty is offline Member
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    DefaultToo much Coddling Puppy?

    Hey people

    Am I coddling my puppy too much? Before I put her to bed, I put her on my lap and pet her and give her kisses. I am a male and smitten by my puppy I can't help it. She usually jumps on me and I pick her up.

    I notice my puppy a "she" is acting up the last few days. I was eating dinner and ignoring her cries because she wanted to be fed. She ended up peeing in front of me. Tonight she decided to rip down my blinds and chew on them. I gave her a few firm "nos " and shook the "coin can" and she continue to chew.

    She was over tired and kept wanting to play. I had no choice but to put her in the crate. I didn't want to use the crate as punishment but couldn't think of a solution.

    Any suggestion and criticism is welcome,

    Thanks

    GoPotty

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  3. #2
    kaytris is offline Senior Member
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    Start as you intend to finish... if you don't mind her jumping on you when she's full grown, 90 lbs and has muddy feet, then continue to allow it. She also needs to learn how to cope with being alone, and if she is continually demanding (and getting) attention, you MAY be laying a foundation for seperation anxiety down the road.

    As for 'she was crying b/c she wanted to be fed - then peeing in front of you" - it's even odds that she wanted out as much as she wanted food. The key to successful housetraining is consistency (of feeding, drinking, outdoor visits and playtime), constant supervision, and containment when supervision isn't possible.

    it sounds like she has a bit too much freedom - she shouldn't have access to your blinds. If you do catch her chewing something forbidden, interrupt her, remove the object and replace it with a "good" chew.

  4. #3
    GoPotty's Avatar
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    Hi Kaytris

    You are so right about my puppy wanting to eat and needed to go the bathroom at the same time. She has never done her business in the house out of spite.

    Good point with the jumping. I am training everyone in the house to grab her paws gently every time she jumps or give a stern "no". Any other suggestions with jumping?

    My crate is in the kitchen and it blocks off one of the two entrances and the other entrance is block by a gate. I don't have any other space so she has access to the blinds. I have chew toys and usually redirect her when she gets in the mood to chew.

    I just venting I know I need to be consistent and keep on trucking.

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    kaytris is offline Senior Member
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    with my dogs, holding their paws either instigated a wrestling game, or I ended up with a dog that didn't like his feet touched. In my opinion, teaching a 'sit to say hello' is a much more effective method.

    Copy and paste from another thread:Work on sit to say hello. First, rope in a friend or two that will follow instructions to the letter (promising dinner or wine usually helps). Second, leash puppy and stand in the middle of a fairly open room, and ask him to sit. Have your friend quietly approach you - both of you are watching the puppy - if he gets up or tries to jump, your friend IMMEDIATELY turns around and steps back several feet. Pause for a few seconds until you get puppy back into a sit, then repeat - friend approaches, doing abrupt aboutfaces if the puppy breaks. Once your friend is able to reach you, they do NOT interact with the puppy yet - they simply say hello to you and then continue moving on. Once the puppy is happily holding his sit as your friend passes, have them stop and say "hi fido" as they hold their hand out for a sniff. Again, if the pup breaks, about face and back off. Work up to having them greet your puppy more and more enthusiastically, insisting on interaction ONLY if the puppy stays seated.. anything less, and the fun person immediately leaves.

    When you are on walks, of course you can't expect random passersby to follow your instructions, but you can still work on getting sits as they pass you by - you may need to give yourself some distance initially, by moving up on to yards etc.

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    Yes, that's exactly what you must remember: she will not be that size forever, haha. Now it's ok to hold her and let her jump, but in about 3 or 4 months she will already be WAY bigger. My pup already plays too rough with me when I go greet her in the morning...I'm trying to make her sit to say hello with no progress, she is too hyper for that hahaha. Just try to pet her on the floor, and not let her think that when she jumps on you, you are going to pet her...let her spend some time alone too, so she doesn't get separation anxiety...
    Check my profile for pictures of my puppy
    Videos of her here:
    http://www.youtube.com/user/JuliaAndJorge

  8. #6
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    oooh Kaytris.. thanks! We tried that SAME scenario when we were breaking Malone out of the 'jumping up on ppl' habit and it was INCREDIBLE how fast he caught on. In fact, he got a little ticked at the Trainer for 'baiting' him and then turning her back on him. ha ha.


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    GoPotty's Avatar
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    Thanks Kaytris!

    I have a few friends that want to see the puppy so my wallet isn't opening. lol We are going to do this exercise, this is going to be pretty funny to see.



    Quote Originally Posted by kaytris View Post
    with my dogs, holding their paws either instigated a wrestling game, or I ended up with a dog that didn't like his feet touched. In my opinion, teaching a 'sit to say hello' is a much more effective method.

    Copy and paste from another thread:Work on sit to say hello. First, rope in a friend or two that will follow instructions to the letter (promising dinner or wine usually helps). Second, leash puppy and stand in the middle of a fairly open room, and ask him to sit. Have your friend quietly approach you - both of you are watching the puppy - if he gets up or tries to jump, your friend IMMEDIATELY turns around and steps back several feet. Pause for a few seconds until you get puppy back into a sit, then repeat - friend approaches, doing abrupt aboutfaces if the puppy breaks. Once your friend is able to reach you, they do NOT interact with the puppy yet - they simply say hello to you and then continue moving on. Once the puppy is happily holding his sit as your friend passes, have them stop and say "hi fido" as they hold their hand out for a sniff. Again, if the pup breaks, about face and back off. Work up to having them greet your puppy more and more enthusiastically, insisting on interaction ONLY if the puppy stays seated.. anything less, and the fun person immediately leaves.

    When you are on walks, of course you can't expect random passersby to follow your instructions, but you can still work on getting sits as they pass you by - you may need to give yourself some distance initially, by moving up on to yards etc.

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