What is your exercise routine for lab puppy before shots? - Page 3
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Thread: What is your exercise routine for lab puppy before shots?

  1. #21
    HersheyK's Dad's Avatar
    HersheyK's Dad is offline Senior Member
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    For those that posted the 'THE DOG EATS ROCKS'.

    Pay attention here: DO NOT LET YOUR DOG EAT ROCKS.

    Rocks do not pass through. Eventually cause a blockage which can kill your dog, or other less fatal issues. Surgery is the only way to remove them, not good for the dog or your wallet.
    Hershey Kisses, In charge of getting Ed out to the dog park so that he gets some exercise.

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  3. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by GoPotty View Post
    I have a big old pine tree so I can going to tie the lead on that and supervise her when she runs around. Has your pup ever got sick or choke on twigs, rock or gravel or any foreign objects outside?
    Tie her if you must, but if you are not watching pretty closely she will chew on or through the lead. That's why its better just to hold on to it and wander around the yard with her.

    I have never had a dog get hurt chewing a twig, although injuries are certainly possible if a stick has a sharp end I suppose. However, I watch like a hawk to make sure they don't eat rocks, a rock larger than certain size (depends on the dog and shape of rock probably), or a whole bunch of smaller rocks eaten together, get stuck in the stomach, cause a blockage, and require surgery to remove. The problem is that a dog's esophagus is larger than the opening between stomach and intestines, so they can swallow something indigestible and not be able to pass it.

    Really big rocks that they can't swallow can still do damage by breaking teeth if chewed.

  4. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by JuliaAndTroia View Post
    she hates standing still, but she does love to lie on my lap while chewing her toys...
    If she likes to do that then you could also let her chew a special extra tasty toy she only gets while having her nails done.

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  6. #24
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    Okay got it, watch her like a hawk and look for anything objects that might cause a problem. I am going to rake the yard this weekend. I take your advice to hold the leash as well. She pulls really hard. Should I use more force and pull back even though I am not really walking the dog? I know I shouldn't but she tends to bury her head in the weeds and I can't see what she is eating. Should I use my hand and body to move her out of the way instead?

    Thanks for the tips hershey K and threeTs






    Quote Originally Posted by ThreeTs View Post
    Tie her if you must, but if you are not watching pretty closely she will chew on or through the lead. That's why its better just to hold on to it and wander around the yard with her.

    I have never had a dog get hurt chewing a twig, although injuries are certainly possible if a stick has a sharp end I suppose. However, I watch like a hawk to make sure they don't eat rocks, a rock larger than certain size (depends on the dog and shape of rock probably), or a whole bunch of smaller rocks eaten together, get stuck in the stomach, cause a blockage, and require surgery to remove. The problem is that a dog's esophagus is larger than the opening between stomach and intestines, so they can swallow something indigestible and not be able to pass it.

    Really big rocks that they can't swallow can still do damage by breaking teeth if chewed.

  7. #25
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    Ok... Mei Mei is CUTE!


  8. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by GoPotty View Post
    She pulls really hard. Should I use more force and pull back even though I am not really walking the dog? I know I shouldn't but she tends to bury her head in the weeds and I can't see what she is eating. Should I use my hand and body to move her out of the way instead?
    No, you don't want to pull back, at some point she may be too big for that to work anyway. See dogs do not naturally give to pressure, they push/pull into it. So by pulling on her you are actually giving her even more reason to pull against you. It is hard to get some lab puppies not to pull because they are so active and relatively insensitive to discomfort.

    Until she has had more training and/or is old enough to wear a gentle leader harness or prong collar (depending on which training philosophy you want to follow), consider this scenario:

    You carry puppy out of the house wearing a collar and light 15 or so foot line (cotton clothesline, washed to make it soft, is a nice cheap long line. Set her down and let her potty and play. As long as there is no tension on the long line (she is not pulling) then you go wander around with her, play games, work on recalls, etc. If she scurries of in some direction and ends up pulling out at the end of the line, you "be a tree" and she does not get to go any further in the direction she wants to go until she stops pulling, and eventually not until she turns to look at you or comes back to you. You do not reel her in while she is pulling, you just stop where you are and stand in place, holding the line at the same length.

    It will not work quickly, but it is better than a pulling match. If she gets sort of stuck out there not wanting to let up, get her attention (high pitched speech works best) and call her too you for a treat and start over. You need to work on come in the house so that she knows it before trying to get a response outside.

    With the head in bushes thing, carry treats and toys with you, when she starts getting into something, go over to her show and distract her away from it with a toy or treat and have her play with you or do a sit or trick instead of munching on bad stuff. If you know that there is a certain area or object that she keeps getting into, try to avoid it and find some bitter taste deterrent spray to put on it. Also, if you can carry her without her struggling and wanting to be put on the ground, carry her around your neighborhood so that she gets to see new things without being on the ground with the germs, if you have a large shoulder bag she could ride in it with you keeping a hand on her so she doesn't jump.

    Have you looked at the "Our Best Advice" sticky at the top of this forum topic? It has lots of puppy tips. Also, there are many good puppy raising books on the market that might answer your questions better than we can, there have been threads on this forum with book recommendations. It is good for you to be asking questions and trying to do right by your pup, but there is nothing like a good book.

    She is very pretty by the way.

  9. #27
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    Thanks for the lengthy response and compliment. I will give the "best advice" thread another look. I finish reading Cesar Milan- How to raise the perfect dog. I am reading the monks of new skete now.

    I was using a 4 foot leash so was having trouble with all the pulling. Her neck and back muscles have grew substantially over this week. I know it will take time but look forward to seeing her respond to food or toys when she is in the zone outside.

    Thanks for the reminder to pick up some bitter apple.







    Quote Originally Posted by ThreeTs View Post
    No, you don't want to pull back, at some point she may be too big for that to work anyway. See dogs do not naturally give to pressure, they push/pull into it. So by pulling on her you are actually giving her even more reason to pull against you. It is hard to get some lab puppies not to pull because they are so active and relatively insensitive to discomfort.

    Until she has had more training and/or is old enough to wear a gentle leader harness or prong collar (depending on which training philosophy you want to follow), consider this scenario:

    You carry puppy out of the house wearing a collar and light 15 or so foot line (cotton clothesline, washed to make it soft, is a nice cheap long line. Set her down and let her potty and play. As long as there is no tension on the long line (she is not pulling) then you go wander around with her, play games, work on recalls, etc. If she scurries of in some direction and ends up pulling out at the end of the line, you "be a tree" and she does not get to go any further in the direction she wants to go until she stops pulling, and eventually not until she turns to look at you or comes back to you. You do not reel her in while she is pulling, you just stop where you are and stand in place, holding the line at the same length.

    It will not work quickly, but it is better than a pulling match. If she gets sort of stuck out there not wanting to let up, get her attention (high pitched speech works best) and call her too you for a treat and start over. You need to work on come in the house so that she knows it before trying to get a response outside.

    With the head in bushes thing, carry treats and toys with you, when she starts getting into something, go over to her show and distract her away from it with a toy or treat and have her play with you or do a sit or trick instead of munching on bad stuff. If you know that there is a certain area or object that she keeps getting into, try to avoid it and find some bitter taste deterrent spray to put on it. Also, if you can carry her without her struggling and wanting to be put on the ground, carry her around your neighborhood so that she gets to see new things without being on the ground with the germs, if you have a large shoulder bag she could ride in it with you keeping a hand on her so she doesn't jump.

    Have you looked at the "Our Best Advice" sticky at the top of this forum topic? It has lots of puppy tips. Also, there are many good puppy raising books on the market that might answer your questions better than we can, there have been threads on this forum with book recommendations. It is good for you to be asking questions and trying to do right by your pup, but there is nothing like a good book.

    She is very pretty by the way.

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