How to comfort as they get older....
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Thread: How to comfort as they get older....

  1. #1
    mosmama's Avatar
    mosmama is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultHow to comfort as they get older....

    What do you guys do for your babies as they age? I try and rub Mo's back legs and massage him....I've been taking him on more short walk to keep some muscle in his legs. He really is in great shape (86 lbs and not an ounce of fat on him!)

    Just wondering from the ones who have had seniors if there is anything I could do for my baby. He's fine, but I want to make every day the best for him!!!!
    Mo
    May 17, 1998 - May 20, 2009

    The Love of My Life
    Rest in peace my Sweet Chocolate
    I Love You and Miss You so much


    He is your friend, your partner, your defender, your dog. You are his life, his love, his leader. He will be yours, faithful and true, to the last beat of his heart. You owe it to him to be worthy of such devotion.



    LIMO

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  3. #2
    talleyJudy's Avatar
    talleyJudy is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: How to comfort as they get older....

    One thing I have a strong personal opinion about is that I believe senior dogs would fare better if they could avoid re-vaccination as they age.

    Auggie is the first dog of the many dogs that we have had in the last 35 years that has lived to her 12th birthday. She has had no vaccine of any type, and no heart worm, of flea/tick preventatives for the past 6 years. Every Spring she has a full blood work up and has been heart worm negative. It is a real gamble either way with vaccines, but I choose not to purposefully and artificially stress her senior immune system.

    Now, my husband (78 yrs) says that in his life here on the farm they have had many dogs live past 14 years (prior to the late 1970's) and they never bothered with vaccinations at all. If they survived illness/accident through their first year they lived to grow quite old.

    Just food for thought and a lot of study/investigation on a personal level.
    "If there are no dogs in Heaven, then when I die I want to go where they went." author Will Rogers

    Auggie 12/29/95 ~ 01/15/09

  4. #3
    talleyJudy's Avatar
    talleyJudy is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: How to comfort as they get older....

    Oh, another thing I have learned to do is give an older dog a choice of dog bed - warm place, cool place, bare floor, throw rug, firm cushion, softer cushion. Some times Auggie will sleep on the bedroom carpet, sometimes on her "egg crate type" foam dog bed, sometimes in her over sized crate that has a water filled 3/4" pad topped with a plush throw rug and finally topped with a folded double bed sized 'el cheapo' comforter that we used to use on our bed.
    "If there are no dogs in Heaven, then when I die I want to go where they went." author Will Rogers

    Auggie 12/29/95 ~ 01/15/09

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    totiegirl is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: How to comfort as they get older....

    One thing I have a strong personal opinion about is that I believe senior dogs would fare better if they could avoid re-vaccination as they age.
    Im keen to learn more about why some think this is in the best interest of older dogs.
    She has had no vaccine of any type, and no heart worm, of flea/tick preventatives for the past 6 years
    My Totie (12) was only vaccinated and on heartworm up until she was 2 or 3 maybe.
    The main reason I didn't continue was purely financial reasons. Now years later things are much better I have been considering whether to have her re-vaccinated. I have a vet appointment this weds and will talk to the vet about it also, but I feel that the vet will say that she needs to be done, but should I at such an old age?? Totem has only been to a vet for her vac shots, heartworm and desexing.
    She is healthy and has no problems that I know of...yet!
    I agree with tallyJudy alot of choice for bedding is great as their needs change.

  7. #5
    mosmama's Avatar
    mosmama is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: How to comfort as they get older....

    Thank you tallyJudy! You did have a lot of great ideas. Mo is used to sleeping in my bed or should I say his bed...LOL and will lay on my carpets (I have hardwood floors). He never was one for a dog bed, but I never introduced it to him because he would always sleep with me. Would it be worth buying one to see if he would lay on it? Occasionally, he will lay on the hardwood if he's warm after playing....
    As for the vaccinations, Mo has been vaccinated since he was a pup and continues to be vaccinated, as well as HWP, etc.
    Mo
    May 17, 1998 - May 20, 2009

    The Love of My Life
    Rest in peace my Sweet Chocolate
    I Love You and Miss You so much


    He is your friend, your partner, your defender, your dog. You are his life, his love, his leader. He will be yours, faithful and true, to the last beat of his heart. You owe it to him to be worthy of such devotion.



    LIMO

  8. #6
    talleyJudy's Avatar
    talleyJudy is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: How to comfort as they get older....

    ""She is healthy and has no problems that I know of...yet!""

    And she is now 12, I think the above says it all. I did not save bookmarks but if one 'googles' vaccinosis + dogs there is a lot of interesting reading. The fact that Totie had had her puppy series plus boosters until she was three means that she is probably still carrying that immunity. The pharmaceutical have not done challenge testing beyond three years, and many feel that the immunity acquired is possibly good for the lifetime of the dog.

    If one wants to spend money at the vet and is curious, one could request a full blood profile be done for Totie that will tell you how her main organ systems are doing: liver, kidney, adrenal, etc. That might make you vet a bit happier too.
    But if Totie were my dog, I would pass on the boosters - even pass on rabies if she had a rabies vaccine as a young dog.

    In fact there is a life time rabies challenge test now being conducted at the facilities of the University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI. (not financed by the U of W, but using their facilities)

    http://www.rabieschallengefund.org/index.html




    """CANINE RABIES CHALLENGE STUDIES BEGIN !



    One of the most important vaccine research studies in veterinary medicine is underway at the University of Wisconsin School of Veterinary Medicine in Madison. Dr. Ronald Schultz, a leading authority on veterinary vaccines and Chair of the Department of Pathobiological Sciences, has begun concurrent 5 and 7 year challenge studies to determine the long-term duration of immunity of the canine rabies vaccine, with the goal of extending the state-mandated interval for boosters. These will be the first long-term challenge studies on the canine rabies vaccine to be published in the United States.



    Dr. Schultz comments that: "We are all very excited to start this study that will hopefully demonstrate that rabies vaccines can provide a minimum of 7 years of immunity."



    This research is being financed by The Rabies Challenge Fund, a charitable trust founded by pet vaccine disclosure advocate Kris L. Christine of Maine, who serves as Co-Trustee with world-renowned veterinary research scientist and practicing clinician, Dr. W. Jean Dodds of Hemopet in California. The Rabies Challenge Fund recently met its goal of $177,000 to fund the studies’ first year budget with contributions from dog owners, canine groups, trainers, veterinarians, and small businesses. Annual budget goals of $150,000 for the studies must be met in the future.



    Dr. Jean Dodds, DVM states: "This is the first time in my 43 years of involvement in veterinary issues that what started as a grass-roots effort to change an outmoded regulation affecting animals will be addressed scientifically by an acknowledged expert to benefit all canines in the future."



    Scientific data published in 1992 by Michel Aubert and his research team demonstrated that dogs were immune to a rabies challenge 5 years after vaccination, while Dr. Schultz’s serological studies documented antibody titer counts at levels known to confer immunity to rabies 7 years post-vaccination. This data strongly suggests that state laws requiring annual or triennial rabies boosters for dogs are redundant. Because the rabies vaccine is the most potent of the veterinary vaccines and associated with significant adverse reactions, it should not be given more often than is necessary to maintain immunity. Adverse reactions such autoimmune diseases affecting the thyroid, joints, blood, eyes, skin, kidney, liver, bowel and central nervous system; anaphylactic shock; aggression; seizures; epilepsy; and fibrosarcomas at injection sites are linked to rabies vaccinations.



    Study co-trustee Kris Christine adds: “Because the USDA does not require vaccine manufacturers to provide long-term duration of immunity studies documenting maximum effectiveness when licensing their products, concerned dog owners have contributed the money to fund this research themselves. We want to ensure that rabies immunization laws are based upon independent, long-term scientific data.”



    More information and regular updates on The Rabies Challenge Fund and the concurrent 5 and 7 year challenge studies it is financing can be found at the fund’s website designed by volunteer Andrea Brin at: www.RabiesChallengeFund.org. """





    A very interesting resource is the book:
    Vaccine Guide for Dogs & Cats by Catherine J.M. Diodati, MA who is a vaccine expert and biomedical ethicist. Perhaps you could order it from your local Public Library through the Inter Library Loan program.


    Now, none of this addresses senior dogs specifically but why risk an adverse reaction in a healthy senior who has so far proved her ability to be already immune to whatever she has been challenged with in her normal environment.
    *leaving well enough alone*....

    I am not a veterinarian, but this is my strong personal opinion based on casual study and lifetime experience.
    "If there are no dogs in Heaven, then when I die I want to go where they went." author Will Rogers

    Auggie 12/29/95 ~ 01/15/09

  9. #7
    talleyJudy's Avatar
    talleyJudy is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: How to comfort as they get older....

    totiegirl, here is a quote that a friend pointed out to me and that sort of applies to Totie's situation:


    "Re-vaccinating an already-immune animal has little or no benefit; the previous immunity will act like maternal antibody and inactivate the vaccine, and immunity is not "boosted" at all. So you have all the risks of the vaccination, and no benefit. (Schultz, R.D., "Current and Future Canine and Feline Vaccination Programs." Vet Med 3: No. 3, 233-254, 1998.)

    And here are links to all kinds of interesting scientific articles concerning vaccination protocols and research findings: (about 4/5 down toward the bottom of the page)

    http://www.fallriverlabs.com/Health%20Links.html

    Wishing Totie many more healthy senior years.
    "If there are no dogs in Heaven, then when I die I want to go where they went." author Will Rogers

    Auggie 12/29/95 ~ 01/15/09

  10. #8
    totiegirl is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: How to comfort as they get older....

    talleyJudy, thank you for your very informative post.
    In Australia we don't have rabies, parvo and distemper are the bad ones. I will be requesting that totie have a full blood profile done, just so I know how she is going. I really don't think that I will revaccinate totiegirl as I don't want anything to go wrong with her, but I will spend some time learning more about this because I have to make a decision for Cade my 1yr old lab and many more that I will one day have.
    Thanks again.

  11. #9
    sandgrubber is offline Member
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    DefaultRe: How to comfort as they get older....

    In Australia you can get a C3 vaccine that is certified for 3 years . . . probably a good way to go for a 1 year old. Note, if you skip vaccinations, boarding kennels won't look at your dog.

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