Lesson #6 EXPOSURE For P&S Cameras - Lesson 6-3 Added
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Thread: Lesson #6 EXPOSURE For P&S Cameras - Lesson 6-3 Added

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    DefaultLesson #6 EXPOSURE For P&S Cameras - Lesson 6-3 Added

    Please post all questions in the Questions thread. You will post one picture for critique at the end of the lessons. I want to give out all parts of the Lesson before you begin posting your pictures.

    EXPOSURE LESSON FOR POINT AND SHOOT CAMERAS

    This lesson will be for those people that have point and shoot cameras. Those are cameras where you can’t or don’t won’t to manually change the exposure.

    The first thing I want you to do is go to the lesson for the dSLR cameras and read/learn the definitions of ISO, APERTURE (AV), SHUTTER SPEED (SS – some cameras call this TV), EXPOSURE (EXP), F STOP, and any other terms in that lesson. I’m too lazy to copy that into both lessons.

    Since you will be using the automatic modes on your cameras, you will have no say in how the camera manages the exposure except by which mode you use. Therefore, you have to know what each mode is for and how they differ from one another.

    I would suggest that you read and study the dSLR lesson, too. One day you may have a camera that will do manual exposure. Knowing how to handle exposure, even in automatic modes, helps to ensure well exposed pictures.

    Here are the automatic modes that most P&S cameras have:

    Full Automatic – green rectangle – this mode senses the exposure automatically and takes the picture. The camera sets the ISO, AV, and SS.

    Portrait – Girl’s Head – this mode will blur the background and give a soft look to the person’s features. If you want more blur, get close and fill the frame with your subject from the waist up. You can also have more distance between your subject and the background. The camera picks a small f/stop, and then it uses the SS and ISO to get the correct exposure.

    Landscape – Mountain w/cloud – You will use this mode when you are taking shots at a distance of still objects. The camera will use a medium to large f/stop and a moderate SS. Everything will be in focus in the picture.

    Close Up – Flower – The camera will choose a very small f/stop. You should use this for insects, flowers, or anything you want to get really close to. The main subject will be in sharp focus and the background will be blurred.

    Sports – Runner – This mode will use a very fast SS. It will use as large an aperture as it can and still be able to use a fast SS. Use this mode anytime something in your picture will be in motion. The camera uses continuous focus to track the subject with the center AF (auto focus) point. You can also take more than one picture by holding the shutter button down.

    All the above modes will use the lowest ISO they can to get proper exposure.

    Night Portrait – Head and star – You can use this mode at twilight or night to take pictures of people. It works by using a high ISO with the slowest SS and lowest AV possible. It also uses a slow sync flash. This allows the sensor to capture the light from the flash and also any available light in the background. This mode will really suffer from camera shake or motion of the subjects. If possible use a tripod and ask your subject to hold very still.

    No Flash – Zigzag arrow with line thru it – This disables the flash when you don’t want a flash to fire.

    This lesson on P&S exposure will not be as long as the manual exposure lesson. There isn’t as much to know. I do recommend, again, that you read and study the manual exposure lesson. You will pick up a lot of good info that you can use.

    If you have any questions about the material in this lesson, please do not ask your questions in this thread. Please remember that different makes of cameras may use different symbols to represent different modes. I also know that some of the Nikon cameras have a Baby Mode. This is similar to Portrait Mode except it uses a softer focus that is flattering to infants and children.

    Your assignment is to learn what each of the auto modes does. Practice taking pictures is each mode.


    Eiderdowns That's My Buddy
    CDX, RE, WC, CGC, TDInc.
    Monnie

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    Buddysmom's Avatar
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    DefaultRe: Lesson #6 EXPOSURE For P&S Cameras

    In today’s lesson, I’m going to go over the first three automatic modes and how to get the best picture out of them.

    Auto – Green rectangle – This is a technically correct mode. It uses no artistic exposure to achieve a photo. It is a “what you see if what you get” mode. Definitely point and shoot. The only control you have over the picture is in composition. Pay attention to how your photo is composed to get the best possible picture.

    Portrait – Girl’s Head – In this mode since they use a large aperture (small #), you need to remember your DOF lesson. Do everything you can to maximize a shallow DOF. You can do this by filling the frame with your subject. Get up close and personal. Think of my Lab of the week picture of Buddy. Also, don’t put your subject right up against the background. Try to have at least ten feet between your subject and the background. You want to put yourself as close to the subject as you can while filling the frame with the subject. This will maximize DOF. Just remember that every camera/lens has a minimum focusing distance. You will need to be at least that far away from your subject to get good auto focus.

    Landscape – Mountain w/cloud – In this mode the camera will try to get everything in sharp focus. It will use a smaller aperture (larger #) to do this. Because of this, it might have to use a slower shutter speed. This can lead to problems with camera shake and blurred shots. You need to make sure you have the best light possible to take landscape pictures. The more light the faster a shutter speed the camera can use. If the light isn’t good, remember to steady the camera to avoid camera shake. If you have things in your landscape shots that are moving, they may be blurred because of the slow shutter speed. If this is the case, it is better to use the Auto mode.

    That’s all for today. Your assignment is to play with your camera in these three modes. In portrait mode, try several different positions for you and your subject. See just how distance changes the DOF. Learn just how far you need to be from your subject and your subject from the background to get nice shallow DOF. In landscape mode, see how different lighting conditions affect the sharpness of your photos.


    Eiderdowns That's My Buddy
    CDX, RE, WC, CGC, TDInc.
    Monnie

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    DefaultRe: Lesson #6 EXPOSURE For P&S Cameras - Lesson 6-2 Added

    Exposure Lesson for P&S Cameras Lesson 6-3

    Today will be go over the next three auto modes and see how we can use them to the best advantage.

    Close up – Flower – Extreme close up shots are called macro. They are used to get close up shots of very small objects or parts of objects. Just remember what the minimum focusing distance of your camera is. If you get closer than this distance, your shots will be blurry. Like in portrait mode, fill the frame with your subject as much as possible. To get a larger magnification, zoom your camera in as far as it will go before you focus.

    Sports – Runner – Use this mode when you will have any movement in your photo. It uses continuous focus to get the sharpest photo. It will continually track and refocus the subject until you press the shutter button. It will use the fastest shutter speed for the amount of light present. To get the best photos in this mode make sure there is ample light on the entire area. Keep your center focus point over your moving subject. This will ensure the subject is in focus.

    Night – person w/star – This mode keeps the background from appearing too dark in nighttime shots. It uses a slow sync speed. This means it keeps the shutter open longer than the flash burst. This allows the flash burst to illuminate the person you are shooting and the long shutter opening to capture any ambient light to illuminate the background. Make sure you tell your subject to remain still until after the shot is over. Not just until after the flash has gone off. Although it can be used for evening/twilight scenic shots, you should use landscape mode for those shots. Just make sure there’s nothing moving anytime you use this mode. Although, if you want some cool shots with this mode, try shooting a nighttime street scene with this mode. It will give a blurred motion to the people walking on the street or on any vehicles moving past. They can be very interesting shots.

    This assignment is to work on getting the best results you can with these modes on your camera.


    Eiderdowns That's My Buddy
    CDX, RE, WC, CGC, TDInc.
    Monnie

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