Julie/CaliforniaLabLover
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 26

Thread: Julie/CaliforniaLabLover

  1. #1
    henrysmom is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    8,752

    DefaultJulie/CaliforniaLabLover

    Didn't want to hijack Melissa's thread even more so!! LOL!!

    For our (CKC) on-lead and off-lead heeling exercises, we can either have our left hand at our side or at our left hip. It makes much more sense to me too to have hand position at the same place regardless of whether the lead is on or off, so that the dog still sees the same "picture". Too bad AKC and CKC can't come to an agreement on this so that it's universal.

    Though, my left hand at my front/bellybutton might help with Henery's lagging!!! LOL!
    Gorsebrook Jackson Triggs, CD, RN, WC, CGN<br />Kelrobin A Twist of Fate<br /><br />

  2. Remove Advertisements
    JustLabradors.com
    Advertisements
     

  3. #2
    Baloo317's Avatar
    Baloo317 is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    8,793

    DefaultRe: Julie/CaliforniaLabLover

    I hope this isn't considered a hijack...... :-[

    Are there rules that say what your hand/arm position has to be? ???
    Kate
    Baloo - 5 year old black lab
    Peanut - 7 year old minpin
    Monster - 3-ish year old frenchie/jack, rescue
    We're Superdogs!


  4. #3
    Tatyana is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    5,503

    DefaultRe: Julie/CaliforniaLabLover

    Are there rules that say what your hand/arm position has to be? Huh
    Yes. In AKC, it either has to be naturally hanging and swinging by your side or bent at the elbow with palm touching your belly button (or thereabouts).

  5. Remove Advertisements
    JustLabradors.com
    Advertisements
     

  6. #4
    Baloo317's Avatar
    Baloo317 is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    8,793

    DefaultRe: Julie/CaliforniaLabLover

    Quote Originally Posted by Tatyana
    Are there rules that say what your hand/arm position has to be? Huh
    Yes. In AKC, it either has to be naturally hanging and swinging by your side or bent at the elbow with palm touching your belly button (or thereabouts).
    Are there rules like that for every exercise? Yikes.... I was worried about how I'd remember what exercise happened when.... now I'll have to remember where to keep my arms?? **gulp** :-[
    Kate
    Baloo - 5 year old black lab
    Peanut - 7 year old minpin
    Monster - 3-ish year old frenchie/jack, rescue
    We're Superdogs!


  7. #5
    Tatyana is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    5,503

    DefaultRe: Julie/CaliforniaLabLover

    There are many nuances in every exercise. I don't think many people can learn them all at once. You focus on the big ones at first and eventually master most of them, if not all. It's not rocket science!

  8. #6
    canUdigIt is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    2,559

    DefaultRe: Julie/CaliforniaLabLover

    I never paid any attention actually.

    Who knew?

  9. #7
    henrysmom is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    8,752

    DefaultRe: Julie/CaliforniaLabLover

    You definitely pick up a lot along the way!! Don't worry Kate, Marie's on top of all that.
    Gorsebrook Jackson Triggs, CD, RN, WC, CGN<br />Kelrobin A Twist of Fate<br /><br />

  10. #8
    rottnlabs is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    5,187

    DefaultRe: Julie/CaliforniaLabLover

    Quote Originally Posted by Baloo317
    [Are there rules like that for every exercise?
    Yes. There are lots of little nuances for every single exercise. That's why I just shake my head when just anyone calls themselves a competitive trainer...even those that have never set foot in the ring. All of these little things can and will bite you in the butt. They aren't difficult but you do need to be aware of them because you can be NQd for them. For example, a friend of mine has an awesome BC. She has blown thru the lower level classes. She got up to Utility and the judges really smacked her hard. She used her hands to guide her dog to front. Your arms must be at your sides, not in front, not folded, etc. Same with signals, one arm only then it must be returned to your side. You can't hold it. Directed jumping requires that you pivot while the dog is in the air, not before or after. Gloves require a signal AND a verbal. It goes on and on.
    <br /><br />Lydia, Murray &amp; Essy in AZ<br /><br />Clear Creek&#39;s Mad About You CDX RE NJP OAP OFP ASCA CDX GSN RSN NGC TGO TNO OAC NJC HPN PS1 JHE<br /><br />Larkspur&#39;s Essence RE NAC TNN JHE

  11. #9
    Tatyana is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    5,503

    DefaultRe: Julie/CaliforniaLabLover

    I was worried about how I'd remember what exercise happened when
    The judge will direct you to your next exercise if you forget. However, in A classes, all the exercises follow in the same order, so it's not too hard to remember. Still, my trainer always tells her students to watch what's going on in our classes. It's always good to remember where the heeling pattern begins and go there without the judge having to guide you. Also, remember where the posts for figure 8 will be standing and from which side you'll start heeling. Go there after the heel on leash and wait for the posts to arrive. After the last halt of figure 8, keep the dog sitting; the judge will come to your for the stand for exam exercise (this is especially can be helpful with an excitable dog to let the dog remain stationary for a sec). After SFE, go to the point where heeling begins without judge's guidance (if you're dog tend to lag, like Scotty, run to the beginning of heeling trying to pump him up a bit and get more speed). After the heel off leash is done, go to where the recall starts without judge directing you there.

    It really makes a handler looks so much more prepared. I have received many compliments on my handling mainly because I follow my trainer's advice, observe what's going on in the class, and move efficiently between the exercises. It won't get you Q if you fail, but it makes you look good.

  12. #10
    Scout and friends Guest

    DefaultRe: Julie/CaliforniaLabLover

    I started doing a little dip with my knees when I called Scout on the recall. We were having recall problems and I unconsciously picked up this habit. My instructor said she was going to put braces on my knees to get me to stop! Her point was - they'll probably let it slide in Novice, but you'll get dinged later on and by then it will be a hard habit to break. And Scout will notice the change in my body language too, could cause problems.

    I like training with someone who's very meticulous about this stuff. But she really likes this part of obedience, the do's and don'ts. She doesn't like to see the boundaries being pushed - to her that's what's special about obedience, so she trains us to do everything a certain way. I agree Tatyana - watching the pattern and knowing where you're going to go next, going there before you're directed, it gives an impression of confidence and being capable.


Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25