Doing it on our own
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Thread: Doing it on our own

  1. #1
    shamrox is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultDoing it on our own


    After weeks of looking and interviewing, we have decided to do the training on our own (at least for the beginning). Before everyone goes crazy I have had a trainner with my last lab and I remember all the commands and all of the tricks. What I would like to know is what is the schedule that people use. I have started Petals with the heal and she knows Sit already too. I would like to go the correct progression. What I really am looking for is...what should she learn first, then second, then third...so fourth and so on. Next is about how many days should they stay with the same command until you introduce the new one. Common is about a week with the trainers that I interviewed. I don't know if that is good or just what the trainers wanted to get it over with. This help will be greatly appreciated.


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  3. #2
    ObedienceLabs4Me is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: Doing it on our own

    First of all what a cutie!!!

    Most trainers do the week thing cause it is easy for a classroom situation of classes once a week. Heeling will be an on-going process throughout the training. So, it really depends on how quickly the individual dog catches on to something. Some will catch on to something right a way and others take longer. Just like people. Don't over load with too many new things. I usually have about three new things a week for my classes just so owner and dog don't get overwhelmed. Individually with my dogs, if they catch on to something I will add proofing or another new thing.
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  4. #3
    shamrox is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: Doing it on our own

    That is very helpful. Right now Petals is very good at healing, when others come around or dogs come around she is very good about paying attention when she is on the leash. We are working on automatic sit when we stop. What should be the next thing we should go to?

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  6. #4
    rottnlabs is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: Doing it on our own

    I teach new things at the beginning of each session then review known commands at the end to help build the dog's confidence (always end on a positive). It's very stressful to learn new things so you have to read your dog to know if he can handle more than 1 new item at a time. As for time, it depends on so many factors... 1) amont of time you put into training, 2) your consistancy, 3) dog's learning capacity, etc.
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  7. #5
    Tatyana is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: Doing it on our own

    What should be the next thing we should go to?
    If you're talking in terms of heeling, you can start teaching Petals that pace change: normal to slow then slow to normal, and normal to fast then fast to normal. Also, turns are very important: you don't want your dog to run into you on turns but you also don't want to walk around your dog (which is what I was doing on left turns initially).

    How old is Petals now? I've heard that it takes anywher from 1-2 years to master heeling, and then it's a life-long process to perfection. But it depends on what you want to achieve with your dog too. We're training with at least a UD in mind, so precision is of outmost importance even now while we're getting ready for Novice A.

    It's never to early to learn sit (correct sit not puppy sits), stand from sit, fold down into a sphinx poisition, stand from folded down. Come is really a good command to lay a foundation for in a young pup.

    You can also start working on finishes: around and swing.

    I don't know if there is a particular order necessarily. But I would not start off-leash heeling until you're solid with on-leash heeling (straight lines, change of pace, halts, turns, figure 8). Most importantly, observe Petals. Every dog is different in his/her ability to learn certain things at certain speeds. Having a handful of things that you're working on most often is good to not let your dog get bored with training.

    Oh, the one thing that has become important to me is to let your dogs think things through.

  8. #6
    shamrox is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: Doing it on our own


    I guess I should be more specific. She is about 16-17 weeks. Right now we are not looking to go into competition, we are looking for a great house and family pet that will listen to obedience commands. The reason for some of my questions is I would think that a dog would learn better in a specific order, like you wouldn't teach a dog to lay down before sit (right?). Yes part of our "healling" teaching is us changing pace as well as turning. I think the next thing that we will start will be down then.

  9. #7
    Tatyana is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: Doing it on our own

    Sorry, I thought you were talking about competition obedience. Maybe you can buy or check out a book on dog training. "Dog Training in 10 Minutes" is pretty good. I'm sure others can suggest more books. I think you'll find some type of order or learning commands there. I also think "Training Tips/Puppy Advice" subsection of the forum has great threads that might be of interest to you.

  10. #8
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    Canyon Labradors is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: Doing it on our own

    Actually down, is not part of sit, so you don't have to train each in any specific order. I know you aren't planning on competing but if you were, I would definately not teach down after sit. Teach it independently. A correct down is a dog dropping to it's belly, not a sit and then a down.

    I wouldn't get so hung up on proper order. There is no right order to learn any of it, unless you are teaching complex commands. And with a puppy you aren't.

    I still think a trainer is a good idea. Most of the time they do the week a command thing because they are training YOU how to do the command. I know when I got my 2nd and 3rd, the commands that I knew and used with my dogs were still very hard to train with the pups...like I was learning how to teach them all over again.

  11. #9
    Kzunell is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: Doing it on our own

    Actually I do think there is a proper order to teach things in. as an example you should teach a sit before you teach a stay and you need to teach a stay before you teach a recall. you need either a front or a stay before you can teach a finish. a down is easier to teach from a sit position but you will later have to reteach the down from the standing position for things like the drop on recall. Look at your eyes is a very good thing to teach a young pup. And then a look while you take a step...Forced retriving is easier after you have a sit and stay. A sit for exam is a good thing to teach before the stand for exam...(the sit correction is easier than a stand correction) Teaching your dog to turn right or left on voice command is great before starting agility. (and doesn't hurt in obedience.) Proofing on leash heeling before off leash is begun really helps. Over and up comands can be taught independant. And once you have taught your pup sit stay's and down stays you can teach your dog to go to PLACE (this is really usefull when company is over or you want to do motion picture work with your dog) Clicker work is really good with young pups such as mark or touch. And touch or a forced retreive should be done before a Go Out is taught...Teaching your pup to swim would be a good idea at this age too...Just remember to have fun though..lol

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