tracking
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11

Thread: tracking

  1. #1
    Deanna1002's Avatar
    Deanna1002 is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    rutherford, nj
    Posts
    456

    Defaulttracking

    so i'm having some tracking issues with Apple.

    Some days she'll have an amazing track, other's it's like we've never tracked before.

    We're doing 400 yds. 4/5 90% turns. I still put out food on each leg, (just one drop on each). Sometimes she works very nicely through distractions. Other times, she can't resist goose poop and everything else on the ground.
    She knows her job and will track dead on.

    Should i let her work it out on her own and just encourage her verbally or do i point to the ground and help her out ???? I don't want to correct because i don't want her to dislike tracking. i don't know ...... any suggestions ?


    I've also noticed that she wont track nicely when it's me setting the tracks. Could it be my scent is just too familiar and something that she smells 24/7, not to sure if that has anything to do with it, but was an observation.

  2. Remove Advertisements
    JustLabradors.com
    Advertisements
     

  3. #2
    Amber The Duck Dawg's Avatar
    Amber The Duck Dawg is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Chino,CA
    Posts
    423

    Default

    Teach a "Leave It" command sepperate from tracking (long slow walks in goose poop laden fields where you can make a correction and a leave it command). Then after you have her fully understanding the command and the correction set up a very very simple track with an obvious really attractive distraction and use your leave it when she shows interest. You will have to have a different person set up the distraction than the tracklayer obviously. You can do this on a 30 foot long track with the distraction about 20 feet from the start and about 4-5 feet off the track so the wind blows the scent over the track. Good distractions might include a cat/rabbit/goose in a cage. you can do this on a 6 foot leash so you will be ready to make yourr correction for not doing a Leave it.
    Doing it this way you will only correct her for not doing a leave it, you are not correcting for not tracking. If you spend a solid month working on leave it before you start doing traccks again you should not have any problem with a leave it command on a track.
    If you have trained for other things like obedience then you can do leave its there first.
    The type of correction you use for the leave it command is up to you but leave it can be a real lifesaver for things like skunks/porccupines/dead animals/etc..

    You should also search in yahoo groups for their tracking lists as there are some very good people on there.

    Kelly
    Light, "weedy" individuals are definitely incorrect; equally objectionable are cloddy lumbering specimens. Labrador Retrievers shall be shown in working condition well-muscled and without excess fat. Females should weigh between 55 and 70lbs and Males between 65 and 80lbs. Height females 21.5 to 23.5 inches males 22.5 to 24.5 inches at the withers.

    Kelly
    HR Greenwoods Sealion Tsunami SH "Wave" born 3-9-2010
    Greenwoods Amber Wave VCD2 RA SH AX OF WCX CGC "Amber" born 4-13-2005
    Chino Ca

  4. #3
    Deanna1002's Avatar
    Deanna1002 is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    rutherford, nj
    Posts
    456

    Default

    Hey Kelly thanks for your reply!

    in our obedience class her leave it means leave what ever your sniffing and obsessed about, go to mom and look her straight in the eye. That really has helped in obedience especially with her love for other dogs.
    Now take the same command outside and it's like she's never heard it before. So bringing all that training outside is my next goal.
    I've continuously been having issues with field work because of her distraction with everything in the wild, deers, gofers, etc. but i know she has great prey drive and retriever instincts, so i will continue to work on leave its and distractions out doors.

    Thanks again!

  5. Remove Advertisements
    JustLabradors.com
    Advertisements
     

  6. #4
    Amber The Duck Dawg's Avatar
    Amber The Duck Dawg is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Chino,CA
    Posts
    423

    Default

    Ah, you do field work that is very good and will help everything. You can also use a No command if you have done No No drills for field. I know it isn't exactly the same thing but dogs seem to figure it out pretty well. Do you use an E-collar for field? HAve you started running blinds yet? Do you have a force fetch?
    If you have a force fetch then its a simple fix for tracking. Set up the 30 foot track with the distraction if she goes to the distraction and doesn't leave it on a simple no then simpley usestep up grab collar and correct as you would for a bad retrieve all the way to the article 10 feet away. Don't go to hard on the 1st correction but make it clear this is a correction. You want to instill a good work ethic in the dog make it understand that work is work (Work can be fun but it still has to be done).
    And with your current leave it command you can use it and as the dog turns toward you give a "Find It" command this should cause the dog to go back to tracking. You have alot of tools with this dog because you are doing so many different venues.
    What levels are you at with your training? Obedience, agility,field,etc..????
    Is this Apple? Are you going to do a Derby? She only has a few months left before she is 2 years old and ages out from derby's.

    Kelly
    Light, "weedy" individuals are definitely incorrect; equally objectionable are cloddy lumbering specimens. Labrador Retrievers shall be shown in working condition well-muscled and without excess fat. Females should weigh between 55 and 70lbs and Males between 65 and 80lbs. Height females 21.5 to 23.5 inches males 22.5 to 24.5 inches at the withers.

    Kelly
    HR Greenwoods Sealion Tsunami SH "Wave" born 3-9-2010
    Greenwoods Amber Wave VCD2 RA SH AX OF WCX CGC "Amber" born 4-13-2005
    Chino Ca

  7. #5
    Luvmydog2much's Avatar
    Luvmydog2much is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Windsor Ontario
    Posts
    3,424

    Default

    I never correct on the track. I also don't speak to them when they're tracking.

    IMO you need to go back and see how you taught the legs. We always start 100% knowing where the tracklayer has laid the track. When the dog goes off or isn't tracking well. I simply stop following. When the dog restarts properly on their own, we move forward. We never move forward unless the dog is a) working and b) on track. Its easy when you know where the track is.

    You can also play around with her to help her morale, you lay the track and hide at the end, and have someone else work with her. Her reward is you at the end, whether she is finding you or your glove etc...its a party at the end!
    'Don't grow up too quickly, lest you forget how much you love the beach.'
    ~ Michelle Held


    Rhys, Ruby and Nola

  8. #6
    Deanna1002's Avatar
    Deanna1002 is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    rutherford, nj
    Posts
    456

    Default

    Kelly -

    Derby ??? hmm never heard of that..
    I'm fairly new at everything. As for field work, I didn't know how i felt about e-collars and force fetch until a month ago when apple decided to bring back her birds after she would eat the wings and pluck the feathers. Sometimes she'd be stubborn about it, and pass right by me with it. So collar conditioning is happening this sunday. Then force fetch will start shortly after that.
    We are very close to showing in obedience and agility, but my new obedience school (Top Dog, Flanders, NJ) is very detailed as to exactly how we need to work as a team, and exactly how precise the students need to be so hopefully we will start trialing this summer. Same goes for agility, i'm still having contact and weaving issues, which is expected for a dog with her maturity and my green handling.
    hopefully 2010 is our year!

  9. #7
    Deanna1002's Avatar
    Deanna1002 is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    rutherford, nj
    Posts
    456

    Default

    luv my dog 2 much,

    I usually don't like to correct on the track either but if she finds geese poop she'll eat it and not leave it alone until i physically take her away from it. So it gets verrrry frustrating.
    I also try to let her work it out but if i don't remind her to get back and track she'll go sniff out the more "interesting" stuff. Two weeks ago my friend set up a track with several dead animals around and deer trails but for some reason she truly worked the whole track 200% didnt care about anything but the track. I was such a proud mom, but come last week and it's like she never tracked before.
    Maybe it's just my dog still having puppy blonde moments ? I don't know how to break it to her that she's just not a puppy anymore

  10. #8
    lcspt is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    2,535

    Default

    We are very close to showing in obedience and agility, but my new obedience school (Top Dog, Flanders, NJ) is very detailed as to exactly how we need to work as a team, and exactly how precise the students need to be so hopefully we will start trialing this summer.
    Hope to see you at some of the shows I will be at with my younger dog.
    "In moments of joy all of us wished we possessed a tail we could wag." W. H. Auden

    Linda, Kona and Bo

  11. #9
    Amber The Duck Dawg's Avatar
    Amber The Duck Dawg is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Chino,CA
    Posts
    423

    Default

    I have found that E-collars used correctly work great for a huge range of things. Patience is a must! Keep the level low and use attrition to your advantage. Do not expect to try and acheive a 180 degree change in behavior but instead gradually change it.

    Derby's are the easiest class at field trials restricted to dogs under two years of age. Think of a hard senior test with more distance but no blinds.

    Go watch both a hunt test and a field trial (do not wear white or bright clothes). Look them up on the AKC website (AKC.org) under events and awards. Even better would be to go work at a hunt test (volunteer) and you will get to learn alot.

    Kelly
    Light, "weedy" individuals are definitely incorrect; equally objectionable are cloddy lumbering specimens. Labrador Retrievers shall be shown in working condition well-muscled and without excess fat. Females should weigh between 55 and 70lbs and Males between 65 and 80lbs. Height females 21.5 to 23.5 inches males 22.5 to 24.5 inches at the withers.

    Kelly
    HR Greenwoods Sealion Tsunami SH "Wave" born 3-9-2010
    Greenwoods Amber Wave VCD2 RA SH AX OF WCX CGC "Amber" born 4-13-2005
    Chino Ca

  12. #10
    Labtrckr is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    1

    DefaultTracking other scents

    Deanna - where and with whom do you train tracking? Curious as we track in NJ also and also attend Top Dog, etc. so appear we may not be that far from each other... are you a member of either Lenape or HVTC?

    I agree with prior posters on the use of the "leave-it" command. On several days when you are NOT tracking and at several different locations go to where the disctracting scents are and train the "leave it" with a clicker and treats and get it solid. IMO altho I own an E-collar it is overkill for training leave-it for goose poop. I also would not want the dog to even think of associating anything that happened with an E-collar with tracking. IMO Tracking is not a sport that can really be compelled, it is motivated. While you are training the leave-it track in non-goose pooped areas (I know it's hard to find in NJ, but they do exist ;-). Once the leave-it command is solid off-track (which will likely take several outings), then lay a short, easy track in the area that has the problem scents. If she leave-it awesome - heap on the praise and jackpot at the article. If she gets disctracted by the poop, but then leaves-it on command and goes back to work (tracking)... then reward the leave-it (just as you would if you were not tracking)... later if needed you can put this on variable re-inforcement and fade.

    You did not mention how old your dog is or exactly when the dog is sniffing non-track stuff so it is not clear the extent of the problem... some dogs who do not have a proper start routine appear to fool-around at the start of the track before settling in and working. So if your dog is doing the extra sniffing mostly at the start or before the first turn it could be that it is inadvertantly becoming a part of your start routine.

    My Grady used to sniff and eat goose poop on track when he was younger too. Between using the method described above off-track and then applying the learned command as needed on track while at the same time really making the track itself the focus he became a very focused tracker. I also worked article indication on and off track - put more articles on track at first (not just one at beginning and end) and make a huge deal (time yourself are you praising for at least 30 seconds while giving food/other reward at each article?). If you are ever planning on doing TDX the dog will have to go back to work after finding an article so there is no harm in teaching that command (which can be find some more, back to work or whatever) now and using more articles on the track. More articles also gives you many chances to reinforce your dog on the track for doing the work, helps to slow a fast dog, helps them to learn the back to work command, etc. And then I vary up the distance or # of articles on track to keep them guessing.

    Bottom line, it's hard to say without seeing the dog, but if she's working and stops here or there for a few moments for a sniff and you can read that is what she is doing, and then she gets back to work then you do not have a problem.

    If the sniffing/eating is preferable to her than continuing the track it could be alot of things - not enough of a start routine for the dog to settle in and really know that it's time to work, not enough praise/rewards on the track, if there is punishment/negative reinforcement on the track it could also be a stress behavior, if you have consistently been training tracks that are a certain age or a certain length etc. she could be conditioned to "we track for this long and then we are done" - hard to say for sure without seeing her work.

    Regardless of the cause, the single biggest thing not to do is to fix this on the track. The second thing not to do is give her more line to work off-track... if you know she is off then do not give her more line or move and if she comes towards you or closer shorten it up more until she is on the track and only let it back out when she is on the track and tracking. Like the game, Mother-May-I, she asks for line - and Mother only says yes and lets her move out when she is on track and tracking. It gets trickier if you can't read her well enough yet to tell if she is on track or not... and if that's the case mark the track so you know for sure.

    Hope this helps...

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Tracking Warning!
    By Amber The Duck Dawg in forum Obedience/Tracking
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 07-29-2009, 10:27 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25