Teaching "stop"? (stay there)
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Thread: Teaching "stop"? (stay there)

  1. #1
    Tanya is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultTeaching "stop"? (stay there)

    This is abit beyond basic training and more for competitive uses so hopefully it is ok to post here.

    I would like to teach my dog "stop". For example, if he is moving towards me (say I call him towards me) to stop walking and stand in place. Or same if he is walking away.

    Any tips on how to start teaching this? Part of the application is for agility class to slow him down and get him 2o2o/or if he is off track have him stop so I can better direct. but more to use in different contexts (for training purpuses). Maybe in a similar way herding handlers direct their dogs.

    Thanks!
    Charlie (foster) and Rocky

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  3. #2
    3TailsWaggin's Avatar
    3TailsWaggin is offline Senior Member
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    There are several ways to train this. If you want it for the 2o/2o I would suggest you teach your dog to target first and then apply that to the contact. To teach him to target, get a clicker, the lid of a butter or margarine container, and count out about 10 small treats. Place the margarine lid on the floor. Stand close to it and just watch your dog. As soon as he even glances at the lid, click and treat him. (drop the treat on the floor near the lid, don't feed it to him from your hand). This may take awhile. You may have to stand there a long time. If he absolutely will not look at the lid, just bump it with your toe, if he glances in that direction, click and treat him. You say nothing. You just stand there and every time he looks at the lid, click and treat him. When your 10 treats are gone, quit.

    In the next session, count out your 10 small treats, put the margarine lid on the floor and again wait until your dog looks at the lid, click and treat. Some dogs begin to understand this exercise quickly, some don't. Once he's looking at the lid consistently, don't click/treat him until he touchs the lid with his nose. So wait him out, let him touch the lid (or get closer to it, closer than just looking at it), click and treat. When your 10 treats are gone, quit.

    In the next session (I usually do 2 sessions a day, no more than that). count out your 10 treats, again use the margarine lid and when he touches the lid, click and treat him. This time, when he touches the lid, as you click him, toss the treat across the room so that he will run to get the treat, he will then come back and will soon realized he needs to touch the lid again, click, toss the treat. Repeat this until your 10 treats are gone.

    Once your dog is doing this consistently, add the word "touch" or "target" or whatever you want to call this, to the exercise. Again, use 10 treats, wait until he starts to touch the lid and tell him, "touch!" and as he does, click and toss the treat. Keep this up until your 10 treats are gone.

    Once your dog is consistently touching the lid when you say "touch" take your lid with you to the agility course and put the lid at the bottom of the contact obstacle, maybe about 12" away so he has room to put his front feet in position. Send your dog over the obstacle and tell him, "touch" and as he comes to the bottom of the obstacle and stops and touchs the lid, click and treat him. Do this until your 10 treats are gone.

    In the next session, be more specific with him and be sure he has 2o/2o before he touches and then have him wait a second or two before you click/treat him. This helps him learn the position you are asking him for.

    Once he is consistent with touching the lid at the bottom of the obstacle, remove the lid and have him "touch" the ground. It's easy to transition this as he will naturally come down the obstacle and look to touch the lid, as he drops his nose to the ground, click and treat him.

    If you do this consistently, he will learn to drive to the bottom of the obstacle and stop, 2o/2o.

    I don't like to "slow my dog down" on the contact obstacle. They need to learn to drive over the obstacle and then stop at the bottom of it.

    I hope this helps you.

  4. #3
    3TailsWaggin's Avatar
    3TailsWaggin is offline Senior Member
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    If you want to stop him as he is coming toward you (for obedience work,) you begin by having him stop/stay beside you while heeling. Ask your dog to heel, and when you want to stop tell him "stay" as you use your hand, palm toward the dog's nose, but don't touch him with your hand. Once he is stopped, I like to walk around the dog and tell him to "stay". If he moves, I give a correction (a leash pop) and ask him again.

    Consistency is the key. Use the same cue, ask the same of him each time you do this, and he will begin to understand the exercise.

    Once he can "stop/stay" as you are heeling, you can move in front of him and call him toward you. As he comes toward you, put your hand out, palm facing the dog, and tell him "stay". Do this on leash and not too far away from your dog to begin. If he does not "stay", correct him and ask again. Once he understands to stop/stay, you can leave him there, move around him telling him what a good dog he is. This helps to reinforce that he cannot move until you release him. Always, ALWAYS, release your dog from a "stay" by saying "Okay!". If you fail to release him you fail to teach him that stay means... he must stay there no matter what until you release him from that stay.

    As he becomes consistent, you can add distance to your work.

    Good luck and have fun training.

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    debjen is offline Senior Member
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    Some excellent advice..only thing I do different is I teach the contact performance on a 3-5 foot flat board ... before I move it to the contact equipment..

    I agree that you don't really want them slowing down on contact equipment..so I teach the contact performance separately from striding across the contact equipment..so while I'm teaching them the performance on the short board I get them running across the dog walk/a-frame without any contact perfromance..once they are doing both well then I add them together by back chaining the contact performance on the contact obstacle.

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    Tanya is offline Senior Member
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    He knows target quite well (both my hand or an object) and is already clicker trained so I'd just do a reminder session and see if trainer will let me do it on the way down from the obsticle (might pratcice this at the lab fest!). The technique is simple but I like it. I have read some of hte contraversy of the 2o2o (both for being bad for the front end of the dog as there is pressure there AND for slowing a dog down). Rocky will never compete, we are in it for fun and safety is our main concern.
    Thanks

    I like your second post for other type of "stop". It starts like some of what we started for Rally (to moving stand walk around) but to the next level. DEFINATELY needs alot of work

    Thanks you so much for taking the time to post all this.
    Charlie (foster) and Rocky

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    brody's Avatar
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    never say never
    http://andrea-agilityaddict.blogspot.com/

    “I am only one, but still I am one. I cannot do everything, but still I can do something; and because I cannot do everything, I will not refuse to do something that I can do.” H. Keller

  9. #7
    Tanya is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by brody View Post
    never say never
    LOL - I know I know. I'm actually surprised and how much energy (for him at least) he puts into it, I have been pleasantly surprised. It's been interesting to do something with Rocky that pushes his limits (he is so easy going and fine with EVERYTHING, but teaching him to walk the bridge and go thru the tunnel proved to be an actual challenge for him). We did flyball and Rally but those are more mental challenge to get in position, not at all the same teh same as dealing with heights and cramped corners.
    Charlie (foster) and Rocky

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