Is turkey dangerous?
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Thread: Is turkey dangerous?

  1. #1
    JustineNYC Guest

    DefaultIs turkey dangerous?

    I incorporated turkey into their schedule for the first time the other day. I was able to get turkey drumsticks, they were HUGE, and turkey wings.

    I noticed both times, with both dogs after they swallowed they did this thing with their neck, exending it like they were trying to get the food to go down.

    I never realized how big the bones of a turkey were, compared to chicken. Do I have to be extra careful with turkey?

    Both of them poop fine yesterday and today....no runny poop, (I expected some since this was the first time we had turkey RMB)

    They loved it though, definitely knew it was something different then chicken.

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  3. #2
    Baloo317's Avatar
    Baloo317 is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: Is turkey dangerous?

    I use turkey wings instead of drumsticks, but you're right, those bones do seem a little large. And, the little peices are pretty sharp. :suspious:

    But Baloo hasn't had any issues, I wonder what others will have to say.
    Kate
    Baloo - 5 year old black lab
    Peanut - 7 year old minpin
    Monster - 3-ish year old frenchie/jack, rescue
    We're Superdogs!


  4. #3
    jlab Guest

    DefaultRe: Is turkey dangerous?

    I've been feeding turkey for years and never had a problem. I do prefer to get whole birds and cut up/feed sections rather than feed exclusively legs and wings.

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  6. #4
    kaytris is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: Is turkey dangerous?

    I thought weight bearing bones were generally frowned on?

    If it were me, I'd chop up the larger bones into smaller pieces, or use a meat mallet to 'soften' them a bit.


  7. #5
    jlab Guest

    DefaultRe: Is turkey dangerous?

    Quote Originally Posted by kaytris
    I thought weight bearing bones were generally frowned on?

    If it were me, I'd chop up the larger bones into smaller pieces, or use a meat mallet to 'soften' them a bit.
    The only weight bearing bones of concern are those coming from animals having a lot of weight to bear.

    All animals with legs have weight bearing bones. However, no domesticated commercially grown birds (except emu and ostrich) have legs that bear weight for any significant length of time so these weight bearing bones are relatively soft. This applies to turkey (legs) and chicken (legs). These weight-bearing bones are good to feed, and are basic to many raw diets.

  8. #6
    Baloo317's Avatar
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    DefaultRe: Is turkey dangerous?

    Quote Originally Posted by jlab
    Quote Originally Posted by kaytris
    I thought weight bearing bones were generally frowned on?

    If it were me, I'd chop up the larger bones into smaller pieces, or use a meat mallet to 'soften' them a bit.
    The only weight bearing bones of concern are those coming from animals having a lot of weight to bear.
    I dunno, commercial turkeys are pretty hefty. I won't feed anything weight-bearing from anything larger than a chicken, personally. And Dana said even that's iffy.
    Kate
    Baloo - 5 year old black lab
    Peanut - 7 year old minpin
    Monster - 3-ish year old frenchie/jack, rescue
    We're Superdogs!


  9. #7
    WillV341's Avatar
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    DefaultRe: Is turkey dangerous?

    Baloo, have you seen a commercial chicken/turkey farm? The birds are on their feet for about 1% of their life. I dont think its enough to fully develop bones capable of supporting their weight. I usually feed Oscar turkey necks/backs or ground turkey for mm...
    OSCAR!!!!!! <br />born 11/16/07

  10. #8
    Baloo317's Avatar
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    DefaultRe: Is turkey dangerous?

    I'm not convinced that it really matters how long they're on their feet for, to be honest.

    Edited because my grammar stinks.
    Kate
    Baloo - 5 year old black lab
    Peanut - 7 year old minpin
    Monster - 3-ish year old frenchie/jack, rescue
    We're Superdogs!


  11. #9
    jlab Guest

    DefaultRe: Is turkey dangerous?

    Quote Originally Posted by Baloo317
    Quote Originally Posted by jlab
    Quote Originally Posted by kaytris
    I thought weight bearing bones were generally frowned on?

    If it were me, I'd chop up the larger bones into smaller pieces, or use a meat mallet to 'soften' them a bit.
    The only weight bearing bones of concern are those coming from animals having a lot of weight to bear.
    I dunno, commercial turkeys are pretty hefty. I won't feed anything weight-bearing from anything larger than a chicken, personally. And Dana said even that's iffy.
    It all depends on how you feed, your level of comfort, and the way your dog eats these types of bones. Many weight bearing bones are considered an edible opportunity. Whether a dog actually eats the bone depends on the experience level of the dog and the density of the bone. Some dogs (usually experienced) easily crunch up a whole turkey leg and others (usually inexperienced) just eat the meat off the bone.

    Turkey legs are by no means the hardest weight bearing bones fed by whole prey feeders. Many feed whole lamb legs, whole pig legs and whole goat legs. These animals are slaughtered young when the bones are soft. Whole deer legs are also relatively soft and successfully fed by whole prey feeders.

    You don't want to feed more dense leg/femur/shank bones of sheep and cows unless they're in big hunks with meat/fat/hyde and used as recreational bones. If you do feed the recreational bones, then make sure you pick them up after all the meat, etc. is removed from the bone (so they won't grind their teeth down or break a tooth by just knawing on hard dense bone).

  12. #10
    JustineNYC Guest

    DefaultRe: Is turkey dangerous?

    Quote Originally Posted by kaytris
    I thought weight bearing bones were generally frowned on?

    If it were me, I'd chop up the larger bones into smaller pieces, or use a meat mallet to 'soften' them a bit.

    I thought chopping up bones was frowned upon.

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