Alernative medicine solution to flea bite allergy?
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Thread: Alernative medicine solution to flea bite allergy?

  1. #1
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    DefaultAlernative medicine solution to flea bite allergy?

    ARGH. I had just gotten our dog who is allergic to who-knows-what down to 3 benedryl every other night when someone recommended a great shampoo which would fix that.

    So now we have two dogs, who turn out to be allergic to things you put on dogs to kill fleas (I had known that the one is allergic to those meds you run along their spines but forgotten), and who are now itching like crazy, losing lots of hair, the whole 9 yards. Not to mention what my husband thinks when they wake him by scratching so much, despite the benedryls they are getting.

    So, please help my desperate labs! Are there alternative things we could give them, like homeopathy, or anything? Thanks so much!!!!

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  3. #2
    jlab Guest

    DefaultRe: Alernative medicine solution to flea bite allergy?

    I know there's some effective natural flea treatments out there but I don't recall them right now. Just wanted to let you know that when I had this problem, treating the dogs was just one part of the solution. You also need to treat the house and the yard. Treating the carpets in the house helped tremendously and was very inexpensive. There's a boric acid powder that you can put down in your carpet that lasts for years and is very effective. There's also some natural things you can do to effectively treat the yard. With the yard and house treated, I no longer had any problem with my dogs and treating them was no longer necessary. Maybe others can offer some further insights.

  4. #3
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    DefaultRe: Alernative medicine solution to flea bite allergy?

    Strictly for the dog, you can try neem oil. I think they make a product for the yard and house as well, that's all natural (don't think it's neem though). Ark Naturals makes a spray-on application of a neem and essential oil solution. I've tried it, and I think it works. I say "think" because I don't use anything (except for the occasional Frontline during tick season) and I've never had a problem with fleas *knock on wood*, so I can't really say it works since he doesn't have fleas when he's not on anything. I did try the Ark Naturals on myself, and I did notice a huge improvement with mosquito bites. It may be something to try.

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    Fallriver's Avatar
    Fallriver is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: Alernative medicine solution to flea bite allergy?

    You could also sprinkle diatomaceous earth (sp?) on their coats and on your carpets and yard. Use food grade, not the stuff for filters.
    Dana


    To err is human:To forgive, canine."
    - Anonymous

  7. #5
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    DefaultRe: Alernative medicine solution to flea bite allergy?

    Thanks, everybody! Yes, we are going to be treating the yard as soon as the DE arrives; and we have been treating the house ever since the problem popped up; the problem is that we have been completely unable to stop their horrendous itching, even tho we have done everything we could (bathing them every day and throwing everything we had or could get a hold of at the environment). I just thought it would be good to also treat them for the itching as we get the environment taken care of.

    Oh! I forgot to ask the question I had! Can I put DE on them when their skin is in such bad condition? It's very red in places, and they've lost hair near their backside, and their fur is think along the top of their backs and their legs. I was worried that the DE would cause them pain with their skin so raw.

    Thanks very much!!!!

  8. #6
    Fallriver's Avatar
    Fallriver is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: Alernative medicine solution to flea bite allergy?

    Yes you can. I would make a nice solution of baking soda and water, 2 teaspoons to 8 oz water. You can spray it on or wet a cloth with it and lay the cloth over the affected areas. You could also add some black walnut tincture for added relief. If they are relentless, use a soft elizabethan collar (not hard plastic) to prevent them from chewing the inflamed areas.
    Now, this is the most important part...healthy animals are not good hosts for parasites. Clearly, you have an immune system that needs to be built up as well and as you know, good diet and avoidance of drugs are a good start. They would prolly benefit from some probiotics as well.
    Good luck, it sounds like a nightmare for all of you and I hope it clears up soon!!
    Dana


    To err is human:To forgive, canine."
    - Anonymous

  9. #7
    ObedienceLabs4Me is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: Alernative medicine solution to flea bite allergy?

    Caleb's holistic vet also recommends Neem spray to keep the fleas off.
    Susan
    UCDX GRCH Dunn's Marsh Caleb of Waltona UDX3, OM3, RAE Canadian UD, RE
    FallRiver's Micah of Waltona GN RAE, Canadian CD, RN

    www.labmed.org


  10. #8
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    DefaultRe: Alernative medicine solution to flea bite allergy?

    I have answered this question a lot on other groups, so please forgive me if this sounds like a stock answer, but I hope it helps.

    Please stay away from chemical flea treatments for the house and your pet, Pyrethins are extremely toxic and have killed and sickened countless cats and dogs, they are not necessary for flea control, and often make the situation worse by sickening the animal, causing them to be even more succeptible to parasites.

    First, bathe the animal, no flea shampoo, just use a mild pet shampoo, really any soapy water will drown fleas, rinse thoroughly. I actually find that plain water does the trick because I'm very thorough, but technically, soap breaks the viscosity of the water, making it more likely that the flea will drown rather than jump to safety

    Second, vacuum daily. Wash the pet's bedding reguarly.

    Third, make good use of a flea comb, daily.

    You can also purchase food grade diatomaceous earth at a feed store or a natural food store. Sprinkle this lightly on the pet (try not to stir up too much dust, it can irritate the lungs), sprinkle it on floors, bedding, in the yard, anywhere that you suspect fleas. Let DE sit on the floors a few days before vacuuming it up. One tip, some people put the DE in an old jar, punch a few small holes in the lid and use that as a shaker so that they don't use too much. An abundance of DE can be drying to the skin.

    If your pet is picking up fleas outside, you can apply nematodes to your yard or diatomaceous earth. Some people apply DE to wet grass or water it in to keep the dust down.

    I have had very good luck repelling fleas by spraying my dog with a solution of 50% apple cider vinegar 50% plain water. I also add about a tsp of apple cider vinegar to his water dish per day. This is perfectly safe, and does appear to make the dog distasteful to fleas, ticks and mosquitos. My cats do not go outside, so I do not treat them, they have not picked up any fleas from the dog.

    Keep in mind, as FallRiver said, that the most important aspect of parasite control is a healthy animal. Parasites are attracted to unhealthy hosts, so many people, Vets included, seem to forget this. A natural, high quality diet and minimal exposure to medication and chemicals, goes a long way towards having a healthy pet, who simply will not attract fleas.

    Here are a few good web sites.

    http://www.caberfeidh.com/Fleas.htm

    http://www.wolfcreekranch.net/diatomaceo...

    http://www.earthclinic.com/Remedies/acvi...

    I have also heard of using a combination of boric acid and table salt and sprinkling it everywhere. It should dry up the fleas without harming pets or people.

    Setting bowls of soapy water near light sources does seem to help too. Fleas are attracted to the light as they jump, they land in the soapy water and drown. I don't know how practical it is when you have labs in the house, but it always worked for my Grandma with just one cat.

    Good luck!

  11. #9
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    DefaultRe: Alernative medicine solution to flea bite allergy?

    Yellow Boys Mom, thanks so much for seconding the Neem!


    Quote Originally Posted by Indiana
    I have answered this question a lot on other groups, so please forgive me if this sounds like a stock answer, but I hope it helps.

    Please stay away from chemical flea treatments for the house and your pet, Pyrethins are extremely toxic and have killed and sickened countless cats and dogs, they are not necessary for flea control, and often make the situation worse by sickening the animal, causing them to be even more succeptible to parasites.
    ITA--the dogs were fine (except for the one, who was actually better than she had been for a long time) until I put this stuff on and bang! both of them. I will never use any of that stuff again, and I'm going to tell other people not to, too!!!!

    First, bathe the animal, no flea shampoo, just use a mild pet shampoo, really any soapy water will drown fleas, rinse thoroughly. I actually find that plain water does the trick because I'm very thorough, but technically, soap breaks the viscosity of the water, making it more likely that the flea will drown rather than jump to safety

    Second, vacuum daily. Wash the pet's bedding reguarly.

    Third, make good use of a flea comb, daily.
    That seems like it would hurt where their skin is raw, which is almost everywhere Should I wait til they are more healed up?

    You can also purchase food grade diatomaceous earth at a feed store or a natural food store. Sprinkle this lightly on the pet (try not to stir up too much dust, it can irritate the lungs), sprinkle it on floors, bedding, in the yard, anywhere that you suspect fleas. Let DE sit on the floors a few days before vacuuming it up. One tip, some people put the DE in an old jar, punch a few small holes in the lid and use that as a shaker so that they don't use too much. An abundance of DE can be drying to the skin.
    This is a great idea; we go through parmesan cheese like crazy and I can use that!

    If your pet is picking up fleas outside, you can apply nematodes to your yard or diatomaceous earth. Some people apply DE to wet grass or water it in to keep the dust down.
    How often should I put DE down?

    I have had very good luck repelling fleas by spraying my dog with a solution of 50% apple cider vinegar 50% plain water. I also add about a tsp of apple cider vinegar to his water dish per day. This is perfectly safe, and does appear to make the dog distasteful to fleas, ticks and mosquitos. My cats do not go outside, so I do not treat them, they have not picked up any fleas from the dog.
    Thanks, this sounds great too.

    Keep in mind, as FallRiver said, that the most important aspect of parasite control is a healthy animal. Parasites are attracted to unhealthy hosts, so many people, Vets included, seem to forget this. A natural, high quality diet and minimal exposure to medication and chemicals, goes a long way towards having a healthy pet, who simply will not attract fleas.
    The one dog has always had problems with allergies, skin problems, you name it. She and the other are littermates who have always been together, and the other has had no problems even tho they have always been treated the same! But the one got guadesis (???sp???) when she was young and we always thought that had something to do with it.

    Here are a few good web sites.

    http://www.caberfeidh.com/Fleas.htm

    http://www.wolfcreekranch.net/diatomaceo...

    http://www.earthclinic.com/Remedies/acvi...

    I have also heard of using a combination of boric acid and table salt and sprinkling it everywhere. It should dry up the fleas without harming pets or people.

    Setting bowls of soapy water near light sources does seem to help too. Fleas are attracted to the light as they jump, they land in the soapy water and drown. I don't know how practical it is when you have labs in the house, but it always worked for my Grandma with just one cat.

    Good luck!

    [/quote]Thanks so much for all this info, and it didn't sound canned at all

  12. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
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    DefaultRe: Alernative medicine solution to flea bite allergy?

    Quote Originally Posted by 2labs
    Third, make good use of a flea comb, daily.
    That seems like it would hurt where their skin is raw, which is almost everywhere Should I wait til they are more healed up?
    Yes, I would wait. I would not want to cause an aversion to being combed or irritate an area that is in the process of healing. That's just my personal opinion, but I would wait to use the comb. However a bath with plain warm water would drown the fleas and keep the healing skin relatively clean.



    If your pet is picking up fleas outside, you can apply nematodes to your yard or diatomaceous earth. Some people apply DE to wet grass or water it in to keep the dust down.
    How often should I put DE down?
    To be honest, I've never seen a recommendation for how often to apply it to the yard. My personal advice would be as needed. If the fleas seem to be coming back, time to apply it again. If you're lucky, maybe they won't come back Don't forget to water it in, it's best to apply on a non-windy day or cover your nose and mouth and keep the animals out of the yard until the dust has settled. It's not toxic, but as I said it can really irritate the lungs.

    The one dog has always had problems with allergies, skin problems, you name it. She and the other are littermates who have always been together, and the other has had no problems even tho they have always been treated the same! But the one got guadesis (???sp???) when she was young and we always thought that had something to do with it.
    Every dog is an individual. I hope that some of these suggestions help.

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