Who has been doing titers the longest??
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Thread: Who has been doing titers the longest??

  1. #1
    hark67 is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultWho has been doing titers the longest??

    I am waiting anxiously for the results of Guthrie's titers. Due to a severe allergic reaction he had at 7 months I opted to not give him his one year booster shots. I did titers instead and they were fine at one year and at two years too.

    I asked the tech in the vet's office how long they have been titering dogs and what the longest she has seen a dog have an acceptable titer. She said they have been doing it about 10 years and the longest she has seen a dog have an acceptable titer was 7 years. Most, she said, last only about 3 years. If this is the case then i wonder if I am just wasting my money doing titers. Perhaps just better to get the vaccine which would cover me if I had to kennel Guthrie for 3 full years.

    How many of you do titers and how long was it until your dog needed a booster shot. any thoughts about titers?

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    Henery&Ollie's mom is offline Senior Member
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    Megan, I had Henery's titers done in the summer of 2008 for distemper and parvo. He was last vaccinated for these in 2005. So, at 3 years, he still had appropriate titers. I'm having him tested again this year (we will now be 5 years post last vaccination)... should be interesting to see what's what.

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    Deanna1002 is offline Senior Member
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    I don't have an answer for you being I've never done one before... But I do have a solution..... Don't worry but Guthrie needing his shots for a kennel I is could take care of him when your gone

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    Top Of The Hill is offline Senior Member
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    I already mentioned this in your other thread, but we ended up having to re-vaccinate after only two years. I have to dig out my records as I can't remember which of the titers came back low. In our case it really does get very expensive as we have to titer yearly per local kennel requirements. Last summer we titered (which is about three or more times the cost of vaccinating here) and then ended up vaccinating as well. We just got a reminder in the mail today that vaccines are due as for the most part people still vaccinate annually here. We'll do titering again I guess, but this has left me kind of puzzled. I really thought from what I'd read that we'd be good for at least three years if not longer. So this had made me wonder.....If she already was low on one of the titers at under two years since her last vaccine would we be putting her at risk by only vaccinating every three years....which is ideally what I would like to do and what seems to be the new standard in a lot of places by what I've read.
    Last edited by Top Of The Hill; 07-13-2010 at 01:13 AM.

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    hark67 is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Deanna1002 View Post
    I don't have an answer for you being I've never done one before... But I do have a solution..... Don't worry but Guthrie needing his shots for a kennel I is could take care of him when your gone
    LOL! Don't even joke about that or I will have him on your doorstep with his watermelon and his suitcase!!

    Top of the Hill.....I share your frustration. I really thought the vaccines would last more than 3 years since that is the protocol around here now. Where did you say you live aga

    It is expensive here too....I think it cost $172. I'll have to check.

    From what I understand a dog can be protected even with a very low titer.....maybe there has not been enough research done(or the tests are not sensitive enought) to prove that and therefore our vets need to recommend revax if titer comes back low. I still need to call my vet and set up Guthrie's appt. I will be curious to see if all of his titers come back low or if it was just certain ones.

    I know I have mentioned this before.....I had to have titers done for working at the hospital. Even though I received an additional vaccination prior to going away to college my Rubella titer came back low(the other employees titers were fine and they did not get the additional vaccination). They recommended that I get revaccinated AGAIN but I chose not to.

    I found this statement on the CDC website:
    My patient has had two documented doses of MMR. Her rubella titer was nonreactive at a prenatal visit. What should I do?
    It is possible that she failed to respond to both doses. It is also possible that she did respond but has a low level of antibody. Failure to respond to two properly timed doses of MMR vaccine would be expected to occur in one or two persons per thousand vaccinees, at most. A small number of people appear to develop a relatively small amount of antibody following vaccination with rubella and other vaccines. This level of antibody may not be detectable on relatively insensitive commercial screening tests. Controlled trials with sensitive tests indicate a response rate of >99% following two doses of rubella-containing vaccine. I would suggest you make a note of her documented vaccination and stop testing. Another approach would be to administer one additional dose of MMR. However, there are no data on the administration of additional doses of rubella-containing vaccine in this situation.

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    Henery&Ollie's mom is offline Senior Member
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    Megan, I think low titers are still protective. Think of it this way... say your body is a small city. The circulating antibodies (what titers measure) are the police cars/ambulances/fire trucks that are driving around on the city roads. There are other police cars/ambulances/fire trucks still at their stations. So, if you just base the level of protectiveness on what you see driving around, it can be misleading. Same with circulating antibodies. Our bodies' defence systems go much farther than just these circulating antibodies. Unfortunately as far as I'm aware, there is no good definitive test out right now that can test 100% of one's protectedness (is that a word?? lol) against certain things... distemper, parvo whatever.

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    Top Of The Hill is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Henery&Ollie's mom View Post
    Megan, I think low titers are still protective. Think of it this way... say your body is a small city. The circulating antibodies (what titers measure) are the police cars/ambulances/fire trucks that are driving around on the city roads. There are other police cars/ambulances/fire trucks still at their stations. So, if you just base the level of protectiveness on what you see driving around, it can be misleading. Same with circulating antibodies. Our bodies' defence systems go much farther than just these circulating antibodies. Unfortunately as far as I'm aware, there is no good definitive test out right now that can test 100% of one's protectedness (is that a word?? lol) against certain things... distemper, parvo whatever.
    Great way of explaining this Felicia! I had read something along the same lines when researching titering and I wondered last year when one of Dee's came back on the low side if it could simply be because she hadn't been exposed to this particular disease recently.....so to go with your description perhaps if she had been exposed then more of the emergency vehicles would have been circulating. As there's no way to be sure that this is the case as far as I know and I really didn't want to take any chances (plus she needs either annual vaccines or annual good titers for the kennels) I ended up revaccinating. I would be kind of surprised if she was exposed to any of the diseases she was titered for though and only the one came back low.

    Edited to add that I just checked back and it was her distemper titer that was low. For various reasons I ended up going with the combo vaccine last year even though only the one titer was low. Megan it will be interesting to see what came back low with Guthrie's titers.
    Last edited by Top Of The Hill; 07-14-2010 at 01:00 PM.

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    YellowJakesMom is offline Senior Member
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    I had Jake titered at his holistic vet last summer. Everything came back fine and he was 3 years out from his 1 year old vaccine series. We're not retitering until two more years from this summer. By then he'll be 6 years out from his last DA2PP vaccine. I just wish we could get permission to titer for Rabies. Heck, I had my Rabies titer checked last year - if it's acceptable for humans it should suffice for dogs as well.

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