I do homemade food
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Thread: I do homemade food

  1. #1
    LexiLuLu is offline Junior Member
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    DefaultI do homemade food

    Not really BARF.

    I just made a batch last week.

    I boiled up beef liver, stewing beef with brown rice. The added sweet potato, carrots and eggs. Batch filled up 5 16oz Ziploc containers.

    I thaw out the day before as needed.


    The total cost is less than commercial canned.


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  3. #2
    Tanya is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: I do homemade food

    just curious - how do you know this has all the nutrients your pup need (protein, fibre, vitamins, etc...). I'm thinking of raw down the road and that is my biggest fear.
    Charlie (foster) and Rocky

  4. #3
    LexiLuLu is offline Junior Member
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    DefaultRe: I do homemade food

    Quote Originally Posted by Tanya
    just curious - how do you know this has all the nutrients your pup need (protein, fibre, vitamins, etc...). I'm thinking of raw down the road and that is my biggest fear.

    I don't believe in BARF. It is based on the dog being a carnivore. I don't know of any canine (dogs, wolves, foxes, etc) that are carnivores. They are omnivores. To feed a 80-90% protein diet is bad for them based on physiology. There is also a lack of complete vitamin and mineral supply in a meat only diet.

    Omnivores need a balance of carbs, proteins and fats.


    As far as BARF dogs being healthy, I think that has more to do with them no longer eating McDonald's everyday (otherwise known as commercial dog food)


    But that's my opinion based on my research of canine dietary needs.

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  6. #4
    kallie is offline Member
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    DefaultRe: I do homemade food

    I don't believe in BARF. It is based on the dog being a carnivore. I don't know of any canine (dogs, wolves, foxes, etc) that are carnivores. They are omnivores. To feed a 80-90% protein diet is bad for them based on physiology. There is also a lack of complete vitamin and mineral supply in a meat only diet. Omnivores need a balance of carbs, proteins and fats
    Actually this is wrong..As a true "BARF" diet does consist of meat, veggies and fruit. A dog that eats a "BARF" diet does not only get proteins, but fats and carbs too.. BTW..IF a dog eats meat with skin on it, they are getting some fat

    BARF is a "type" of RAW feeding..

    Anyway..Are you adding any calcium, and other supplements to this diet? Homecooked diets HAVE to be supplemented in order for the dog to be healthy..

    Jen
    Emmi-Black Lab..Happy<br />Buster-Yellow Lab...Sleepy<br />Max-GSD...Doc<br />Argos-GSD mix...Sneezy<br />Annie-Aussie mix..Bashful<br />Lucky-Chi...Dopey<br />Jen-Human..hmm what&#39;s left...Grumpy<br />&amp; Kallie-GSD...Forever missed &amp; forever in my heart.

  7. #5
    sunnylaz is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: I do homemade food

    Quote Originally Posted by LexiLuLu
    Quote Originally Posted by Tanya
    just curious - how do you know this has all the nutrients your pup need (protein, fibre, vitamins, etc...). I'm thinking of raw down the road and that is my biggest fear.

    I don't believe in BARF. It is based on the dog being a carnivore. I don't know of any canine (dogs, wolves, foxes, etc) that are carnivores. They are omnivores. To feed a 80-90% protein diet is bad for them based on physiology. There is also a lack of complete vitamin and mineral supply in a meat only diet.

    Omnivores need a balance of carbs, proteins and fats.


    As far as BARF dogs being healthy, I think that has more to do with them no longer eating McDonald's everyday (otherwise known as commercial dog food)


    But that's my opinion based on my research of canine dietary needs.
    But that doesn't answer Tanya's question about how do you know your dog is getting the proper ratio of nutrients?
    <br />Jonah - born 6/20/07

  8. #6
    LexiLuLu is offline Junior Member
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    DefaultRe: I do homemade food

    Quote Originally Posted by sunnylaz
    Quote Originally Posted by LexiLuLu
    Quote Originally Posted by Tanya
    just curious - how do you know this has all the nutrients your pup need (protein, fibre, vitamins, etc...). I'm thinking of raw down the road and that is my biggest fear.

    I don't believe in BARF. It is based on the dog being a carnivore. I don't know of any canine (dogs, wolves, foxes, etc) that are carnivores. They are omnivores. To feed a 80-90% protein diet is bad for them based on physiology. There is also a lack of complete vitamin and mineral supply in a meat only diet.

    Omnivores need a balance of carbs, proteins and fats.


    As far as BARF dogs being healthy, I think that has more to do with them no longer eating McDonald's everyday (otherwise known as commercial dog food)


    But that's my opinion based on my research of canine dietary needs.
    But that doesn't answer Tanya's question about how do you know your dog is getting the proper ratio of nutrients?
    Lexi gets calcium and vitamin D via yogurt. She gets a little bit of 6%MF Balkan yogurt (pure yogurt with no additives) every morning.
    As far as the rest, its a matter of measuring your ingredients.
    Also, as omnivores, each and every meal does not need to meet 100%. As with Humans, over the course of several meals, all the nutritional components are met.

  9. #7
    kallie is offline Member
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    DefaultRe: I do homemade food

    Lexi gets calcium and vitamin D via yogurt. She gets a little bit of 6%MF Balkan yogurt (pure yogurt with no additives) every morning.
    I use to feed homecooked, and I can assure you, your dog is not getting what it needs via yogurt, when it comes to calcuim and other needed vitamins..Any book on homecooked diets, will tell you that..

    Jen
    Emmi-Black Lab..Happy<br />Buster-Yellow Lab...Sleepy<br />Max-GSD...Doc<br />Argos-GSD mix...Sneezy<br />Annie-Aussie mix..Bashful<br />Lucky-Chi...Dopey<br />Jen-Human..hmm what&#39;s left...Grumpy<br />&amp; Kallie-GSD...Forever missed &amp; forever in my heart.

  10. #8
    JacksAndLabs is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: I do homemade food

    I'll stick to my bag of McDonalds, thank you very much
    ~Nicole<br />Grand Ledge, MI<br /><br />

  11. #9
    jlab Guest

    DefaultRe: I do homemade food

    Quote Originally Posted by LexiLuLu
    I don't believe in BARF. It is based on the dog being a carnivore. I don't know of any canine (dogs, wolves, foxes, etc) that are carnivores. They are omnivores..
    "Dogs have recently been reclassified as Canis lupus familiaris by the Smithsonian Institute (Wayne, R.K. 'What is a Wolfdog?' www.fiu.edu/~milesk/Genetics.html), placing it in the same species as the gray wolf, Canis lupus. The dog is, by all scientific standards and by evolutionary history, a domesticated wolf."
    (Feldhamer, G.A. 1999. Mammology: Adaptation, Diversity, and Ecology. McGraw-Hill. pg 472.)

    "Those who insist dogs did not descend from wolves must disprove the litany of scientific evidence that concludes wolves are the ancestors of dogs. And, as we have already established, the wolf is a carnivore. Since a dog's internal physiology does not differ from a wolf, dogs have the same physiological and nutritional needs as those carnivorous predators, which, remember, need to ingest all the major parts of their herbivorous prey, except the plants in the digestive system to grow and maintain their own bodies."
    (Mech, L.D. 2003. Wolves: Behavior, Ecology, and Conservation.).

    "Dogs are Carnivores, this is a biological fact. Look into your dog's mouth. Those huge impressive teeth (or tiny needle sharp teeth) are designed for grabbing, ripping, tearing, shredding, and shearing meat."
    (Feldhamer, G.A. 1999. Mammology: Adaptation, Diversity, and Ecology. McGraw-Hill. pg 258.)

    "They are not equipped with large flat molars for grinding up plant matter. Their molars are pointed and situated in a scissors bite (along with the rest of their teeth) that powerfully disposes of meat, bone, and hide. Carnivores are equipped with a peculiar set of teeth that includes the presence of carnassial teeth: the fourth upper premolar and first lower molar. Contrast this with your own teeth or the teeth of a black bear. A black bear is a true omnivore, as are we. We have nice, large, flat molars that can grind up veggies. Black bears, while having impressive canine teeth, also have large flat molars in the back of their mouth to assist in grinding up plant matter. Dogs and most canids lack these kinds of molars. Why? Because they don't eat plant matter. Teeth are highly specialized and are structured specifically for the diet the animal eats, and the difference between a bear's teeth and a dog's teeth (both species are in Order Carnivora) demonstrates how this can be."
    (Feldhamer, G.A. 1999. Mammology: Adaptation, Diversity, and Ecology. McGraw-Hill. pgs 260.).


    Quote Originally Posted by LexiLuLu
    To feed a 80-90% protein diet is bad for them based on physiology. There is also a lack of complete vitamin and mineral supply in a meat only diet.

    Omnivores need a balance of carbs, proteins and fats.

    But that's my opinion based on my research of canine dietary needs.
    "Dogs are so much like wolves physiologically that they are frequently used in wolf studies as a physiological model for wolf body processes."
    (Mech, L.D. 2003. Wolves: Behavior, Ecology, and Conservation).

    "Thus, feeding dogs as though they were humans (omnivores) taxes the pancreas and places extra strain on it, as it must work harder for the dog to digest the starchy, carbohydrate-filled food instead of just producing normal amounts of the enzymes needed to digest proteins and fats (which, when fed raw, begin to "self-digest" when the cells are crushed through crushing and tearing and their enzymes are released).

    Nor do dogs have the kinds of friendly bacteria that break down cellulose and starch for them. As a result, most of the nutrients contained in plant matter—even preprocessed plant matter—are unavailable to dogs. This is why dog food manufacturers have to add such high amounts of synthetic vitamins and minerals (the fact that cooking destroys all the vitamins and minerals and thus creates the need for supplementation aside) to their dog foods. If a dog can only digest 40-60% of its grain-based food, then it will only be receiving 40-60% (ideally!) of the vitamins and minerals it needs. To compensate for this, the manufacturer must add a higher concentration of vitamins and minerals than the dog actually needs. The result of feeding dogs a highly processed, grain-based food is a suppressed immune system and the underproduction of the enzymes necessary to thoroughly digest raw meaty bones."
    (Lonsdale, T. 2001. Raw Meaty Bones)

  12. #10
    imported_Nick's Avatar
    imported_Nick is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: I do homemade food

    How old are these dogs you're talking about? I keep seeing stuff about supplementing with calcium, but if they're still puppies that's something you need to keep an eye on, whether you feed kibble, homemade, or BARF.

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