Relationship between Hip Issues and Crating and Excess/Lack of exercise
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Thread: Relationship between Hip Issues and Crating and Excess/Lack of exercise

  1. #1
    LabsLand is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRelationship between Hip Issues and Crating and Excess/Lack of exercise

    Hi All.

    Does anybody in the forum have any readings, links, refereces I can check that relate the Crate training (low exercise in the first 6 months of a puppy) or Climbing stairs/hills (high exercise) or jumping with issues in hips?

    I want to make sure that when I get my puppy and start training I am doing the right things in terms of exercise, and I wonder if there is any scientific publication relating these practices listed above with hip issues prevention??

    Thank you!

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  3. #2
    CaliforniaLabLover's Avatar
    CaliforniaLabLover is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: Relationship between Hip Issues and Crating and Excess/Lack of exercise

    I wouldn't exactly call crate-training "low exercise." The point of crate-training isn't to keep a puppy all cooped up, it is to protect them from harm to themselves (as well as your house/furniture/etc.) when you aren't around to directly supervise. That means, when you're around (which is when they'll be active anyhow), you're playing with them, working on training them and teaching house-manners, as well as house-breaking and taking them on lots of walks or trips to the park to romp.
    Crates should never be used as a "substitute" for good training and proper exercise.

    JMHO.

    As far as the rest, I *think* I may understand what you're getting at with regards to predispositions to orthopedic disease if overexercised too early on in development (just like with human kids), but I'll have to do a bit of research to come up with the exact scientific articles on this topic that I've read.

    ~Julie, Rogue, Monty, and Eddy~

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    LabsLand is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: Relationship between Hip Issues and Crating and Excess/Lack of exercise

    Thank you CalifoniaLabLover.

    I agree that crating is part of the training and to protect the puppy, but I was wondering if the fact that some may abuse of this method is not the reason why some puppys may develop some orthopedic condition.
    Is this predisposition something new? Or maybe 50 years ago they did not screen breedings the way we do nowadays?
    I am sure many have research this and I just would like to know more about it.
    I guess I am trying to figure out what part of those orthopedic conditions may be occurring due to environmental situations so I can be prepared. There is a genetic component, and there is probably an environmental condition to it? The way they are allowed to sit when they are growing up, the intensity of exercise, the type of jumps and runs thay to which they are exposed as part of the training to satisfy the challenging owner?

    Thanks again. I will continue to read about appropriate exercise, recommendations, etc.


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  6. #4
    Dani's Avatar
    Dani is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: Relationship between Hip Issues and Crating and Excess/Lack of exercise

    Well sure, some people may abuse crating...but why would you be worried about it if that is not going to be your intent? Is there any evidence....sure....look at any puppymill dog who's whole life is stuck in a cramped crate. They are almost always deformed, have low muscle tone, etc. We had a foster dog when our rescue first started that spent a lot of time in a crate and she couldn't jump or really utilize her back legs to their full extent. She was young so it didn't take long to build up her muscle.

    Again, my boys have ever only been crated for about 3 hour stretches at a time. When I am home, tons of exercise and interaction.

    Orthopedic conditions are first breeding and genetics, and then yes, they are affected by environment, diet, weight and activity. Many times, I am seeing active dogs with ortho issues...not low activity dogs.
    Dani, Rider & Rookie
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  7. #5
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    brody is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: Relationship between Hip Issues and Crating and Excess/Lack of exercise

    I can give you lots of examples of dogs who were never crated yet had AWFUL hips - one being dear our own love Laurice

    I wouldn't worry too much for your own dog and in fact encourage folks to use a crate generally speaking

    cheers
    http://andrea-agilityaddict.blogspot.com/

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  8. #6
    Baloo317's Avatar
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    DefaultRe: Relationship between Hip Issues and Crating and Excess/Lack of exercise

    https://www.justlabradors.com/forum/i...html#msg506191

    Here's a good thread that talks about ways to limit your chances of exacerbating hip dysplasia, should it be present (as it is a congenital issue.) There was lots of good advice given there.



    Kate
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    DefaultRe: Relationship between Hip Issues and Crating and Excess/Lack of exercise

    There is a very interesting article regarding the need for moderate exercise for properly developing hip joints... http://www.showdogsupersite.com/hips.html

    Here's a more general one that I had bookmarked:
    http://www.peteducation.com/article....&articleid=444

    I've been pretty successful to date on hips and subscribe to a moderate exercise regime around here. As soon as pup has basic obed skills, they are allowed to go on off lead group walks on a dirt/grass surface w/ the older dogs. This gives them the opportunity to change pace as desired, which allows for more even conditioning. They also begin to swim at a young age. I try to keep jumping to a bare minimum, just in case!!! -Anne

    WindyCanyon Girls, August 2014

  10. #8
    LabsLand is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: Relationship between Hip Issues and Crating and Excess/Lack of exercise

    Thank you all for your opinions and advice.

    Baloo317 and Anne replied with some amazing links with a lot of information. Very interesting readings. I am sure in a couple of months I will have a geat collection of articles I will be able to share with newbies.

    It seems I take one step forward to take 2 backwards. But that's part of the process of learning.


    https://www.justlabradors.com/forum/i...html#msg506191

    _________________________________________________
    http://www.showdogsupersite.com/hips.html
    _________________________________________________
    http://www.peteducation.com/article....&articleid=444


    _________________________________________________


    I also want to highlight a great source of information:

    http://breedingbetterdogs.com/articles.html

    Thanks a lot!!



  11. #9
    LabsLand is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: Relationship between Hip Issues and Crating and Excess/Lack of exercise

    I found this article called Diet, Exercise, and Weight as Risk Factors in Hip Dysplasia and Elbow Arthrosis in Labrador Retrievers
    by the Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.

    The conclusion is that in Swedish Labradors bred for hip and
    • elbow conformity,
    • feeding patterns,
    • diet,
    • weight, and
    • exercise

    are risk factors that have to be taken into account in developing
    preventive measures as well as in the design of research to
    elucidate the multifactorial background of skeletal diseases.

    The link is: http://jn.nutrition.org/cgi/content/...6/7/2050S#SEC2

    They charge US$8.00 from 1 to 4 copies. As expected, many of these studies are based on statistics, probability of occurrences, and samples. But if you are interested, you may try that website. (I have to go back and review my statistics books...)




  12. #10
    LabsLand is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: Relationship between Hip Issues and Crating and Excess/Lack of exercise

    Environmental Influences

    Environmental factors such as type of food and exercise in puppyhood have been shown to affect the displayed symptoms within the same litter. However, subsequent generations from both groups showed the same rates of dysplasia meaning that while the phenotype may be affected, the genotype is what determines whether a dog has the potential for being affected with HD.

    In general, low protien diets and low activity levels through puppyhood reduced the symptoms of HD markedly. However, the degree of diet reduction and no activity may or may not be practical for the average dog-owner to attempt. (See Willis.)

    It's best to keep your puppy from any kind of jumping for the first year or so in life. It's also best to keep from sustained exercise until at least a year old. Sustained exercise includes: jogging with owner, pulling weights, mushing, running with owner on bike, etc. Even for dogs not at risk from HD, it's wise not to exercise too strongly too early as such exercise may interfere with proper growth of joints, leading to similar problems such as arthritis on the joint or OCD.
    SOURCE: Canine Medical Information, Part II - Author:Cindy Moore
    [email protected]
    http://www.k9web.com/dog-faqs/medica....html#l_240907

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