cancer and diet
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Thread: cancer and diet

  1. #1
    TBGSAM is offline Senior Member
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    Defaultcancer and diet

    I was searching for diet suggestions for a dog with cancer and have come up with a few one listing Hill's Prescription Diet N/D. Has anyone tried this before and does it help?

    Coleman has had the worst luck - he was finally diagnosed correctly and treated for lyme in 2006, his lupus is in check now since the lyme was treated, but as luck would have it my son was diagnosed with cancer in June of this year. He is on steriods so his appetite has increased. We are feeding him 4-5 meals a day plus treats and he is still so hungry. We have to watch his weight as his hips are declining as well. Any help with diet suggestions is most appreciated.


    Coleman - CGC blk lab 6/02/97-2/25/08 adopted
    Tootsie - choc lab 10/19/99-8/03/13 adopted
    Bailey - CGC newf/fc 7/12/00-07/15/14 rescued
    Ginger - BT 11/16/05 rescued
    Sarah - blk lab 6/22/06 rescued
    rescued felines - AJ - 8/00 - 1/11, Merlin - 5/20/05, Tucker - 8/3/10, Penny - 7/7/13

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  3. #2
    jlab Guest

    DefaultRe: cancer and diet

    I'm very sorry to hear about Coleman. I had a lab diagnosed with bone cancer who was given one month to live and ended up living 6 mores years thanks to a holistic vet that I found. One of the major changes this vet made was switching her to a raw diet of fresh foods. I'm not familar with Hills N/D but I think you have to ask yourself if it would work as well as a raw diet to provide the best conditions conducive to combating cancer. Here's some info from CSU's Vet School on components of a good diet for a pet with cancer (http://csuanimalcancercenter.org/wbs...xtid=Nutrition):


    Nutritional support for your pet with cancer...

    Good nutrition goes hand in hand with quality of life. Indeed, good nutritional support has been shown in people and in animals to not only improve quality of life, but also length of life by enhancing the beneficial effects of surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy while at the same time reducing the side effects of these therapies. You can play a key roll in enhancing your pet’s quality of life by providing good nutritional support.

    The first question many people ask is, “What do I feed my pet with cancer?” The answer is quite simple: anything your pet will eat! But if your pet will eat, then you and your veterinarian should develop a dietary plan that will benefit your special pet. While the ideal cancer diet for the pet is not known, there are some simple concepts that can be followed:

    • Provide a diet with good aroma and taste
    • Minimize simple carbohydrates (starches and sugars)
    • Provide a diet that has high quality protein sources (meat, fish)
    • Whenever possible, consider enhancing the levels of n-3 fatty acids


    A big challenge for pets with cancer is the prevention and treatment of a finicky appetite. Several steps can be taken including:

    • Providing a variety of fresh foods that are very tasty and good smelling to dogs and cats. Warming the food to just below body temperature can enhance the appeal of many foods. Cats are intermittent eaters; hence food should be available to them throughout the day.
    • Work with your veterinary health care team to prevent and treat any discomfort. A pet that is painful will often not show interest in eating.
    • Work with your veterinary health care team to prevent and treat nausea.
    • Work with your veterinary health care team to prevent and treat dehydration. A dehydrated pet will often have a poor appetite. Your veterinarian may teach you how to administer fluids under the skin to prevent or to treat dehydration.
    • When the above has not worked, consider the addition of appetite stimulants as prescribed by your veterinarian.
    • Do not change the diet at the same time as chemotherapy or other drugs are administered if these drugs have the chance of causing nausea. This results in “food aversion” where your pet may associate the uncomfortable feeling with the food rather than the true culprit, chemotherapy or other drugs or procedures.


    When oral intake is not possible, assisted tube feeding is a great option to enhance both quality and length of life. This method also ensures you can give medicines, fluids and nutrition without worrying if your pet will eat or not. Assisted tube feeding is the placement of a small tube into the esophagus (in the neck), stomach (gastrostomy tube) or intestine (jejunostomy tube) to allow the non-painful administration of food, water and medicine. The key is to begin this assisted tube feeding before significant weight loss is observed. These assisted tube feeding techniques should be considered as a great way of preventing any decline in your pet’s health and should be used early in the course of your pet’s disease. You must be an advocate for your pet: Don’t hesitate to contact your veterinary health care team to discuss the importance of nutritional care of your pet.

    The Internet and other sources of information are brimming with promises of the health benefits of a wide variety of dietary supplements. Most are unfounded and unproven, but your veterinary health care team welcomes discussion of any treatments that may help your pet. We strongly urge you to discuss any and all treatments or supplements with your veterinarian before you administer them.

  4. #3
    TBGSAM is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: cancer and diet

    Thank you for replying and for the link, it is very informative. Coleman along with the other three get fruits and vegetables now but I don't know if I can do the meat on a regular basis but will try mixing in the meats with his regular food. I am sorry to hear about your lab, but it is amazing to know that you had her for so many years after her diagnosis. Coleman has a tumor the size of a softball coming off his spleen, there are several smaller tumors along his throat. He was found to have a heart murmur a couple months ago, as a result of his cancer he has fluid around his lungs. He is such a lover though you wouldn't know he is sick to look at him or the way he acts; still initiates play with his siblings.

    Thank you again for your response and the link.
    Coleman - CGC blk lab 6/02/97-2/25/08 adopted
    Tootsie - choc lab 10/19/99-8/03/13 adopted
    Bailey - CGC newf/fc 7/12/00-07/15/14 rescued
    Ginger - BT 11/16/05 rescued
    Sarah - blk lab 6/22/06 rescued
    rescued felines - AJ - 8/00 - 1/11, Merlin - 5/20/05, Tucker - 8/3/10, Penny - 7/7/13

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  6. #4
    jlab Guest

    DefaultRe: cancer and diet

    You may want to cut out the fruits from his diet since these are simple carbs that feed cancers. You could make this up with more high quality fresh meats or fish. Even a variety of fresh ground meat (e.g., ground beef, ground lamb, ground pork) would be great.

    Is Coleman undergoing chemo or radiation treatments? I'm pulling for him. Please periodically update us on his condition.

    You may want to do a search on the forum for holistic vets. They can do phone or email consultations with you or your local vet and recommend a course of treatment that they have been successful with in their practice.

  7. #5
    TBGSAM is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: cancer and diet

    Thank you for the suggestions on the ground meat and removing the fruit from his diet. No Coleman isn't having treatments. His only meds are the steroids and pain management. I will do a search for the holistic vets.
    Coleman - CGC blk lab 6/02/97-2/25/08 adopted
    Tootsie - choc lab 10/19/99-8/03/13 adopted
    Bailey - CGC newf/fc 7/12/00-07/15/14 rescued
    Ginger - BT 11/16/05 rescued
    Sarah - blk lab 6/22/06 rescued
    rescued felines - AJ - 8/00 - 1/11, Merlin - 5/20/05, Tucker - 8/3/10, Penny - 7/7/13

  8. #6
    Snowco Labradors's Avatar
    Snowco Labradors is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: cancer and diet

    So sorry you are dealing with this.

    www.dogaware.com for info on diet and cancer


  9. #7
    kassabella's Avatar
    kassabella is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: cancer and diet

    Sorry you are dealing with this. I lost Kassa to bone cancer of the jaw. She was given a month and lived 10 months. This was a long time as bone is very agressive and surgery was out of the question.

    Rather than dribble on in here if you want to know what I did you can read her web site for info. In there there is the bone cancer site which has all the holistic diets.

    I didn't feed kibble. I feed high protein, low sugar and vitamins.

    I beleive the love and positive thoughts are the best therapy.


    Kassa 25/11/01 - 09/02/05 O.S Jaw cancer forever in my heart.
    Ernie 25/11/01 adopted May 05
    Sam 11? adopted Nov 06 - 18/12/07 Lyphoma
    Tessa. Rescued June 2011.
    Bone Cancer Dogs org.http://www.bonecancerdogs.org/
    http://kassabella.tripod.com/kassabella/
    http://collarsbychris.weebly.com/

  10. #8
    TBGSAM is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: cancer and diet

    snowco - thank you for the link, I will contact my vet on Friday (she is closed today) to see about Turmeric/curcumin for Coleman.

    kassabella - I am sorry to hear about Kassa and will look into the diets.
    Coleman - CGC blk lab 6/02/97-2/25/08 adopted
    Tootsie - choc lab 10/19/99-8/03/13 adopted
    Bailey - CGC newf/fc 7/12/00-07/15/14 rescued
    Ginger - BT 11/16/05 rescued
    Sarah - blk lab 6/22/06 rescued
    rescued felines - AJ - 8/00 - 1/11, Merlin - 5/20/05, Tucker - 8/3/10, Penny - 7/7/13

  11. #9
    Snowco Labradors's Avatar
    Snowco Labradors is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: cancer and diet

    Good luck. I so hope all of this can help Coleman.

    Please keep us posted as to how he does on a new diet and supplements for those of us who may encounter your issues at some point in our dogs lives.


  12. #10
    kassabella's Avatar
    kassabella is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: cancer and diet

    [quote=CTBSAM ]
    I was searching for diet suggestions for a dog with cancer and have come up with a few one listing Hill's Prescription Diet N/D. Has anyone tried this before and does it help?

    but as luck would have it my son was diagnosed with cancer in June of this year.

    I am so sorry your son was dx as well. I am sorry I didn't mention this before.

    One thing I learned with Kassa. No matter what you do the beast has its own rules.
    I spent too much time worrying about what I should do and perhaps missed some time i could have spent with my companion and soul mate.

    We are here for you when ever you need us.

    Chris.


    Kassa 25/11/01 - 09/02/05 O.S Jaw cancer forever in my heart.
    Ernie 25/11/01 adopted May 05
    Sam 11? adopted Nov 06 - 18/12/07 Lyphoma
    Tessa. Rescued June 2011.
    Bone Cancer Dogs org.http://www.bonecancerdogs.org/
    http://kassabella.tripod.com/kassabella/
    http://collarsbychris.weebly.com/

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