Sudden discoloration of tooth
Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Sudden discoloration of tooth

  1. #1
    windycanyon's Avatar
    windycanyon is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    C. WA
    Posts
    2,623

    DefaultSudden discoloration of tooth

    My 12 yo (Gala) was just in for her annual geriatric checkup/bloodwork 6 wks or so ago and the vet was in awe of her teeth, amongst other things. The other night though, I went to check for tartar, and noticed that one of her outer incisors was discolored greyish (the top 2/3) as if infiltrated w/ something. It's not loose.... doesn't seem to be bothering her as she still enjoys a good chew session w/ her nylas. Can't see any damage there, and her gums are very healthy. Any ideas? I'm going to try to call my clinic and see if I can talk to my vet w/o taking her in. Her mom lived til 13.5 and had awesome teeth as well. I've always done the dental stuff myself-- keep the tartar scraped off regularly (mainly back molars) and brush them when I think about it. -Anne

    WindyCanyon Girls, August 2014

  2. Remove Advertisements
    JustLabradors.com
    Advertisements
     

  3. #2
    Baloo317's Avatar
    Baloo317 is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    8,793

    DefaultRe: Sudden discoloration of tooth

    I found some stuff on the internet Anne, I don't know if it's what you're looking for....

    Tooth discoloration isn't always a problem. Some dogs and cats will develop circles or streaks of dark brown on their teeth. These are usually caused by secondary dentin, a material that the tooth lays down to repair minor damage. In addition, puppies or kittens that were treated with the antibiotic tetracycline will sometimes have yellow or brown teeth when they are adults, says Dr. Tiekert.

    See Your Vet If...
    One or more of your pet's teeth are brown, red, or black
    Tooth discoloration is accompanied by bad breath
    Your pet can't open his mouth or is having trouble opening it
    He can't close his mouth
    He won't eat or has difficulty chewing or swallowing
    His tongue, lips, or muzzle are swollen
    There is a foreign object stuck in his mouth
    His gums are red and swollen, or there is bleeding
    Your pet is drooling or panting excessively
    His tongue or gums are blue or pale
    Your pet has ulcers on his tongue
    He is gagging frequently
    There is a lump anywhere on his face
    He is pawing frequently at his mouth or face
    There is a discharge from his mouth or nose that lasts two days or longer
    His breath is consistently bad
    Your pet's nose is dry, crusty, or bleeding
    His mouth is foaming, or he's grinding his teeth
    There is dried saliva around the mouth

    from: http://home.ivillage.com/pets/symsolve/0,,ljz7,00.html
    And this is from an "ask the vet" page:

    Hi Dr. B,

    The strangest thing has happened to my 3 year old Boxer. One of his teeth has changed color. It is the fang on the left side. It suddenly became pink, and then slowly changed to grey. It doesn't seem to bother him at all. What is going on here?

    Barbara
    St. Paul, MN


    Your dog suffered trauma to his tooth. And the scenario that you have described is very common, especially in the canine teeth (fangs). It can happen to both dogs and cats.

    The type of trauma that causes tooth discoloration is called concussive trauma. In short, it is trauma that injures the inside of the tooth, but does not break the tooth. The most common cause of this is biting down too hard on food or a toy.

    Concussive trauma causes injury to an area of the tooth (known as the pulp) that contains blood and nerves. This causes bleeding inside the tooth, which turns it pink. Over time, the color changes to grey as the blood breaks down and is no longer fresh. It can be quite unsightly.

    Unfortunately, it can also be painful, and it can lead to problems down the road. The most recent statistics I have seen state that 92% of animals with discolored teeth will have chronic problems with their pulp. Over time, these can lead to severe problems such as abscesses (infections), inflammation, and sometimes even bone infections.

    Any dog or cat with a discolored tooth should be evaluated by a vet, preferably one with the ability to take dental X-rays. In some cases, the tooth is monitored with regular X-rays. For teeth with severe or chronic pulp problems, extraction (removal) or root canal may be needed.

    from: http://www.dogster.com/columns/drbarchas.php?i=119
    I hope that helps.... :-\

    Kate
    Baloo - 5 year old black lab
    Peanut - 7 year old minpin
    Monster - 3-ish year old frenchie/jack, rescue
    We're Superdogs!


  4. #3
    windycanyon's Avatar
    windycanyon is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    C. WA
    Posts
    2,623

    DefaultRe: Sudden discoloration of tooth

    Thanks Baloo! I bet that is what happened-- 2nd post above. I thought initially I saw pink and then it started going to grey. For a 12 yo, she is still a very avid chewer on nylas. ;D Quite the goofball, really... she could have done it getting excited over a doggy on TV recently as she has to pick up a bone or toy or whatever to greet the animal with (you ought to see the poor TV screen after being scraped w/ nylas over the years!).

    I did call my vet's office today and they said not to worry unless it started to bother her. She's eating fine, it's not loose, no red gums, nothing.... I had googled before asking and came up empty, so I'm glad I asked! -Anne

    WindyCanyon Girls, August 2014

  5. Remove Advertisements
    JustLabradors.com
    Advertisements
     

  6. #4
    Baloo317's Avatar
    Baloo317 is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    8,793

    DefaultRe: Sudden discoloration of tooth

    From your posts, I hope Baloo is half as active and fit as Gala when he's 12!!

    Little tooth discoloration won't slow that Lady down!!
    Kate
    Baloo - 5 year old black lab
    Peanut - 7 year old minpin
    Monster - 3-ish year old frenchie/jack, rescue
    We're Superdogs!


  7. #5
    windycanyon's Avatar
    windycanyon is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    C. WA
    Posts
    2,623

    DefaultRe: Sudden discoloration of tooth

    She is the ultimate of clowns!!!!!! I love her so much, so when I saw that, all I could think of was "oh no, she's kind of old to undergo anesthesia" (hasn't had to since spaying at 5 after her one litter). All her blood levels were great at her 12 yr check, and everybody (incl numerous breeders, who came to see the last litter a month ago) comments how active and agile she still is. No arthritis at all. Topline is still strong and straight. Jumps up on my high bed every night, and sometimes a few times... if there's a doggy on the bedroom TV. ;D Can you say, heart dog??? She is the standard for lab temperament, imo. -Anne

    [attachment deleted by admin]

    WindyCanyon Girls, August 2014

  8. #6
    Baloo317's Avatar
    Baloo317 is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    8,793

    DefaultRe: Sudden discoloration of tooth

    Aww.... what a pretty lady!!
    Kate
    Baloo - 5 year old black lab
    Peanut - 7 year old minpin
    Monster - 3-ish year old frenchie/jack, rescue
    We're Superdogs!


Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25