Dr. W. Jean Dodds Latest Vaccination Schedule
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    Kris L. Christine's Avatar
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    DefaultDr. W. Jean Dodds Latest Vaccination Schedule

    Here is Dr. W. Jean Dodds' Latest Recommendation Vaccination Schedule for those of you who are interested.

    http://www.weim.net/emberweims/Vaccine.html

    Dr. Jean Dodds' Recommended Vaccination Schedule

    Distemper (MLV)
    Initial (e.g. Intervet Progard Puppy) 9 weeks, 12 weeks, 16 - 20 weeks
    1st Annual Booster At 1 year MLV Distemper/ Parvovirus only
    Re-Administration Interval None needed.
    Duration of immunity 7.5 / 15 years by studies. Probably lifetime. Longer studies pending.
    Comments Can have numerous side effects if given too young (< 8 weeks).

    Parvovirus (MLV)
    Initial (e.g. Intervet Progard Puppy) 9 weeks, 12 weeks, 16 - 20 weeks
    1st Annual BoosterAt 1 year MLV Distemper/ Parvovirus only
    Re-Administration Interval None needed.
    Duration of immunity 7.5 years by studies. Probably lifetime. Longer studies pending.
    Comments At 6 weeks of age, only 30% of puppies are protected but 100% are exposed to the virus at the vet clinic.

    Rabies (killed)
    Initial 24 weeks or older
    1st Annual BoosterAt 1 year (give 3-4 weeks apart from Dist/Parvo booster) Killed 3 year rabies vaccine
    Re-Administration Interval 3 yr. vaccine given as required by law in California (follow your state/provincial requirements)
    Comments rabid animals may infect dogs.

    Vaccines Not Recommended For Dogs

    Distemper & Parvo @ 6 weeks or younger
    Not recommended.
    At this age, maternal antibodies form the mothers milk (colostrum) will neutralize the vaccine and only 30% for puppies will be protected. 100% will be exposed to the virus at the vet clinic.

    Corona
    Not recommended.
    1.) Disease only affects dogs <6 weeks of age.
    2.) Rare disease: TAMU has seen only one case in seven years.
    3.) Mild self-limiting disease.
    4.) Efficacy of the vaccine is questionable.

    Leptospirosis
    Not recommended
    1) There are an average of 12 cases reported annually in California.
    2) Side effects common.
    3) Most commonly used vaccine contains the wrong serovars. (There is no cross-protection of serovars) There is a new vaccine with 2 new serovars. Two vaccinations twice per year would be required for protection.).
    4) Risk outweighs benefits.

    Lyme
    Not recommended
    1) Low risk in California.
    2) 85% of cases are in 9 New England states and Wisconsin.
    3) Possible side effect of polyarthritis from whole cell bacterin.

    Boretella
    (Intranasal)
    (killed) Only recommended 3 days prior to boarding when required.
    Protects against 2 of the possible 8 causes of kennel cough.
    Duration of immunity 6 months.

    Giardia
    Not recommended
    Efficacy of vaccine unsubstantiated by independent studies

    There are two types of vaccines currently available to veterinarians: modified-live vaccines and inactivated ("killed") vaccines.

    Immunization Schedules

    There is a great deal of controversy and confusion surrounding the appropriate immunization schedule, especially with the availability of modified-live vaccines and breeders who have experienced postvaccinal problems when using some of these vaccines. It is also important to not begin a vaccination program while maternal antibodies are still active and present in the puppy from the mother's colostrum. The maternal antibodies identify the vaccines as infectious organisms and destroy them before they can stimulate an immune response.

    Many breeders and owners have sought a safer immunization program.

    Modified Live Vaccines (MLV)

    Modified-live vaccines contain a weakened strain of the disease causing agent. Weakening of the agent is typically accomplished by chemical means or by genetic engineering. These vaccines replicate within the host, thus increasing the amount of material available for provoking an immune response without inducing clinical illness. This provocation primes the immune system to mount a vigorous response if the disease causing agent is ever introduced to the animal. Further, the immunity provided by a modified-live vaccine develops rather swiftly and since they mimic infection with the actual disease agent, it provides the best immune response.

    Inactivated Vaccines (Killed)

    Inactivated vaccines contain killed disease causing agents. Since the agent is killed, it is much more stable and has a longer shelf life, there is no possibility that they will revert to a virulent form, and they never spread from the vaccinated host to other animals. They are also safe for use in pregnant animals (a developing fetus may be susceptible to damage by some of the disease agents, even though attenuated, present in modified-live vaccines). Although more than a single dose of vaccine is always required and the duration of immunity is generally shorter, inactivated vaccines are regaining importance in this age of retrovirus and herpesvirus infections and concern about the safety of genetically modified microorganisms. Inactivated vaccines available for use in dogs include rabies, canine parvovirus, canine coronavirus, etc.

    W. Jean Dodds, DVM
    HEMOPET
    938 Stanford Street
    Santa Monica, CA 90403
    310/ 828-4804
    fax: 310/ 828-8251

    Note: This schedule is the one I recommend and should not be interpreted to mean that other protocols recommended by a veterinarian would be less satisfactory. It's a matter of professional judgment and choice. For breeds or families of dogs susceptible to or affected with immune dysfunction, immune-mediated disease, immune-reactions associated with vaccinations, or autoimmune endocrine disease (e.g., thyroiditis, Addison's or Cushing's disease, diabetes, etc.) the above protocol is recommended.

    After 1 year, annually measure serum antibody titers against specific canine infectious agents such as distemper and parvovirus. This is especially recommended for animals previously experiencing adverse vaccine reactions or breeds at higher risk for such reactions (e.g., Weimaraner, Akita, American Eskimo, Great Dane).

    Another alternative to booster vaccinations is homeopathic nosodes. This option is considered an unconventional treatment that has not been scientifically proven to be efficacious. One controlled parvovirus nosode study did not adequately protect puppies under challenged conditions. However, data from Europe and clinical experience in North America support its use. If veterinarians choose to use homeopathic nosodes, their clients should be provided with an appropriate disclaimer and written informed consent should be obtained.

    I use only killed 3 year rabies vaccine for adults and give it separated from other vaccines by 3-4 weeks. In some states, they may be able to give titer test result in lieu of booster.

    I do NOT use Bordetella, corona virus, leptospirosis or Lyme vaccines unless these diseases are endemic in the local area pr specific kennel. Furthermore, the currently licensed leptospira bacterins do not contain the serovars causing the majority of clinical leptospirosis today.

    I do NOT recommend vaccinating bitches during estrus, pregnancy or lactation.

    W. Jean Dodds, DVM
    HEMOPET
    Kris L. Christine
    Founder, Co-Trustee
    The Rabies Challenge Fund
    www.RabiesChallengeFund.org

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    Top Of The Hill is offline Senior Member
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    Kris,

    I recently had my dog titered for distemper, parvo, adenovirus, and leptospirosis (see my other thread). So far they have the results back for the parvo (which is still good) and distemper (which came back low). Previous to titering she was fully vaccinated up to age two. I was very surprised that the distemper vaccine needs renewing so soon......after less than 2 years. Can you shed any light onto why this might be?

    I was planning to do the protocol of every 3 years, but titering because we have to kennel occasionally and the kennels require it. Now I'm not sure what to do. I think I'm probably the only person around here doing titering. I can understand why as it is so expensive, but the three year protocol is not recognized at our local kennels (not without titering). The low distemper titer (1/10) has left me less confident in the duration time of the vaccine, but perhaps I'm missing something.

    Your comments would be appreciated. TIA

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    Top of the Hill,

    This is what Dr. Ronald Schultz had to say in his 2007 presentation to the AKC Canine Health Foundation entitled,What Everyone Needs to Know About Canine Vaccines and Vaccination Programs: http://www.puliclub.org/CHF/AKC2007C...20Vaccines.htm

    "An antibody titer no matter how low shows the animal has immunologic memory since memory effector B cells must be present to produce that antibody. Some dogs without antibody are protected from disease because they have T cell memory, that will provide cell mediated immunity (CMI). CMI will not protect from reinfection, but it will prevent disease."

    "My own dogs, those of my children and grandchildren are vaccinated with MLV CDV, CPV-2, CPI, andCAV-2 vaccines once as puppies after the age of 12 weeks. An antibody titer is performedtwo or more weeks later and if found positive our dogs are never again vaccinated. " I have usedthis vaccination program with modifications (CAV-2 replaced CAV-1 vaccines in 1970's and CPV-2 vaccines were first used in 1980) since 1974! I have never had one of our dogs develop CDV,CAV-1 or CPV-2 even though they have had exposure to many dogs, wildlife and to virulent CPV-2 virus. You may say that I have been lucky, but it is not luck that protects my dogs, it is immunologic memory.


    The vaccines in the quote above are CDV (distemper), CPV-2 (parvovirus), CPI (canine parainfluenza), and CAV-2 (hepatitis), and Dr. Ronald Schultz is the Chair of the Department of Pathobiological Sciences at the University of Wisconsin School of Veterinary Medicine. His challenge and serological studies on canine vaccines form a large part of the scientific data base upon which the 2003 and 2006 American Animal Hospital Association's Canine Vaccine Guidelines are based, as well as the 2007 World Small Animal Veterinary Association's Vaccine Guidelines.
    Kris L. Christine
    Founder, Co-Trustee
    The Rabies Challenge Fund
    www.RabiesChallengeFund.org

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    Every dog is different on how they respond to vaccines that is why titer testing is very good info. And every vaccine is different on how they protect. I have a 14 1/2 yr old who has never had a D-P vaccine since he was 3yr. His titers were still good 4 yrs ago. I have not check his titers since then b/c I will not booster him and he does not go anywhere anymore.
    Alicia

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    Top Of The Hill is offline Senior Member
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    Kris,

    Thanks for your reply. So basically (going by this theory of immunologic memory) the fact that she's gone from a titer (distemper) of 1/50 (last year) to 1/10 (this year) is insignificant? Is it odd that the parvo titer stayed the same at 1/50? I'm curious as to why this titer would drop like this if these vaccines are considered by some to be literally good for life. It seems like this very expensive titer testing each year is rather pointless if the numbers don't necessarily mean much. Am I understanding this correctly? It's frustrating as my Vet (and I believe the laboratory that performed the titer testing) say that this means she needs revaccinating for distemper as it is too low to produce reliable immunity. Unfortunately the local kennels require either annual vaccines..... or titers that are considered high enough to be preventative. (1/10 is not as far as they are concerned) I wish all the Vets would follow the same protocal. Doesn't the AAHA recommend every 3 years for distemper and parvo? If this is the case then I don't understand why all Vets (or at least those who are members of the AAHA) aren't following this protocal if it has been proven to be more than adequate.

    One thing I'm not sure of......exactly what type of vaccine was used when she was last vaccinated, but I'm pretty sure that he said the manufacturer noted it was good for the 3 years. I'll have to ask him about this next time I'm in for something. Do the vaccines have to be MLV? Thanks again.

    millstonekennel - Thanks for your reply. If your dog's titers had dropped (rather than staying in what they consider the good zone) would you have revaccinated? I know your dog is older now, but say if the titers had come back low when he was six or seven?
    Last edited by Top Of The Hill; 06-22-2009 at 04:36 AM.

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    Were was the titer sent?

    millstonekennel - Thanks for your reply. If your dog's titers had dropped (rather than staying in what they consider the good zone) would you have revaccinated? I know your dog is older now, but say if the titers had come back low when he was six or seven?
    Depends on the dog, age and health. If I'm not showing them and they are low then I will not booster them. I don't go to dog parks or doggie day care and they do not go to kennel.
    Alicia

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    Top Of The Hill is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by millstonekennel View Post
    Were was the titer sent?



    Depends on the dog, age and health. If I'm not showing them and they are low then I will not booster them. I don't go to dog parks or doggie day care and they do not go to kennel.
    If you don't kennel or mix with other dogs much I guess it makes it easier. I go to classes at the same place that we occasionally kennel. All the dogs are supposed to be vaccinated for both classes or kenneling, so technically odds should be low of picking anything up there......but you never know. We don't do dog parks.....but meet other dogs sometimes while out walking. I do want to be sure that my dog is covered (but not over-vaccinated)....which is why I started doing the titering. It is way more expensive to titer.......like three or four times as much, but it's worth it if it avoids over-vaccinating. Perhaps the cost and the general lack of knowledge regarding vaccines and titering are the reasons it's still extremely uncommon for people to titer here. Now I'm in a position where I'm probably going to have to vaccinate on top of doing the titering even though it may not be necessary.....otherwise I can't kennel or go to classes. I'd be very curious to know how many Vets are still following the "annual" protocol rather than the three year. I really feel that I'm in a minority here (probably of one) in questioning vaccinating annually. It's frustrating that everyone isn't on the same page with this. I should say that my Vet was fine (and flexable) about doing the titering and the three year protocol, but now that the one has come back with a lower than good reading he does feel that we need to re-vaccinate (at two years since last vaccines given) for at least the distemper.

    Edited to answer your question which I missed the first time I read your post :-)

    I don't know where the blood samples were sent as I don't actually have the copies, but it would be the same lab as last year I would assume. Next time I'm in I'll ask for copies of what they have. I'd like to read their comments. They were still waiting for results on lepto and adenovirus so I thought I'd get them all at once. Does the lab they're done at make a difference?
    Last edited by Top Of The Hill; 06-22-2009 at 04:11 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by millstonekennel View Post
    Every dog is different on how they respond to vaccines that is why titer testing is very good info. And every vaccine is different on how they protect. I have a 14 1/2 yr old who has never had a D-P vaccine since he was 3yr. His titers were still good 4 yrs ago. I have not check his titers since then b/c I will not booster him and he does not go anywhere anymore.
    I'm curious, as I too have a 14 yo. But, don't you worry about your other dogs coming into contact w/ something and bringing it home to the oldster? All I've read is the very young and very old are the ones we need typically to be MOST concerned about. Those in their prime aren't typically a concern unless there are other immune issues going on. Anne

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    Does the lab they're done at make a difference?
    Sometimes. Mine go out to Cornell University. Cornell has been titers for at least 11 yrs maybe more. Idexx and others it is newer to them.

    I'm curious, as I too have a 14 yo. But, don't you worry about your other dogs coming into contact w/ something and bringing it home to the oldster? All I've read is the very young and very old are the ones we need typically to be MOST concerned about. Those in their prime aren't typically a concern unless there are other immune issues going on. Anne
    Distemper is around but not that common. And the distemper vaccine from what I've been told can cause DM in dogs. http://www.byregion.net/articles-healers/Dr_Shawn.html

    Do I worry about my young dogs bring something home from show or class. Not readly b/c most dogs at the dog show or in class are well up to date on vaccine. I worry more about bring home fleas and worm's than anything else.
    Alicia

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