Food Analysis
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Thread: Food Analysis

  1. #1
    Tudyputs is offline Member
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    DefaultFood Analysis

    http://www.dogfoodanalysis.com/dog_food_reviews/

    Found this site while trying to choose a large breed puppy food. What do those of you with more experience think of the reviews?
    I've still got time to search, the pup doesn't come home until the end of March. Thank you.

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  3. #2
    Trickster's Avatar
    Trickster is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: Food Analysis

    The reviews are very one sided -- they are one persons opinion. I would disregard this website. You feed what works for your dog. Foods such as ProPlan, Eukanuba, Royal Canin and others included on the "1 star" list may not be the best in the world but they work for MANY dogs.

    Ignore it.

  4. #3
    Fletchs Pop is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: Food Analysis

    I agree with Trickster. Stick with what your puppy has been using. I wouldn't say ignore the site however. It is a good reference of ingredience in the different foods.

    I would ignore the rating system however. The reviews seem to be written by someone who has knowledge of what ingredience are good for dogs.

    I would read what they have to say about foods then go out and get different opinions from different sources. Then make your own decision. I will repeat, if the dog is doing well on a particular food do not switch it. Particularly if you are dealing with a puppy.
    I work on the theory that if you can train a killer whale to launch itself out of a swimming pool, roll on its side and urinate into a small plastic cup, given only a whistle and a bucket of fish, without a choke chain, then you don’t need those confrontational techniques with dogs. -Dr. Dodman

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  6. #4
    Tudyputs is offline Member
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    DefaultRe: Food Analysis

    Thanks for the input. It seemed pretty thorough BUT your right, it does appear to be one persons opinion...
    What are your opinions on the % of protein?

  7. #5
    Fletchs Pop is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: Food Analysis

    From what I have read, most studies no longer concentrate on the amount of protien. It's actually calcium that "they" are concerned with.

    Do you know the type of dog food the breeder is feeding? Perhaps it's better to start out with letting us know that and then getting an opinion of the food.
    I work on the theory that if you can train a killer whale to launch itself out of a swimming pool, roll on its side and urinate into a small plastic cup, given only a whistle and a bucket of fish, without a choke chain, then you don’t need those confrontational techniques with dogs. -Dr. Dodman

  8. #6
    imported_Nick's Avatar
    imported_Nick is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: Food Analysis

    I think websites like that can be useful just because they have ingredients and percentages all in one spot, but do take their opinions with a grain of salt.

    What are your opinions on the % of protein?
    So long as they're getting at least 25% of their calories from protein, it's usually a good food for large breed pups (as the previous poster mentioned, calcium is very important). You're not limited to just large breed foods, but make sure you pick a food that doesn't have too much calcium (the usual recommendation is around 1.5% or less) and is formulated for all life stages (or specifically for growth). What you don't want is an adult food formulated for maintenance, those foods are not made for growing puppies.

  9. #7
    Trickster's Avatar
    Trickster is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: Food Analysis

    I think websites like that can be useful just because they have ingredients and percentages all in one spot,
    Oh, I agree with this. I have used that website before for just that. I simply take no notice of the reviews.

    Do you know the type of dog food the breeder is feeding?
    Good point...I assume the pup is coming home on dry food?

  10. #8
    Tudyputs is offline Member
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    DefaultRe: Food Analysis

    Purina One is what I was told the pups would be weaned to when the time comes. They'll only be two weeks old on Saturday. I've just heard things at both ends of the spectrum about it being a good or bad food.
    Thanks Again.

  11. #9
    loriwolfelabluv is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: Food Analysis

    Hello Tudyputs,
    You should check out dogfoodproject.com. Again it has tons of valuable info, all someone's opinion but i found it very informative. Purina one is what I used to feed but imo there are so many much better foods out there. This is a quote from the dog food project with regard to menadione (found in purina and many others):
    Some manufacturers leave out the "menadione" part of the above chemical names in their ingredient lists (e.g. you see only "dimethylprimidinol sulfate" listed instead of "menadione dimethylprimidinol sulfate"), and menadione does not only occur in dry and canned foods, but edible chew toys, supplements and treats as well.
    "Thoroughly research any item with an ingredient list that claims a "source of vitamin K", "source of vitamin K activity" or "vitamin K" in parentheses and contact the manufacturer if you have any questions.
    What is it?
    Menadione, also known as vitamin K3, is a synthetic version of vitamin K. The natural occuring compounds are vitamin K1 (Phylloquinone, from plant sources) and Vitamin K2 (Menaquinone, synthesized by bacteria in the digestive tract and absorbed by the body). Technically menadione isn't even a vitamin, but a precursor that is converted in the body after ingestion. Natural vitamin K is fat soluble, while menadione derivatives (pure menadione can not be processed) are water soluble and bypass the natural pathway of utilization by the body."
    Here is a list of negative effects of menadione on the body. It is incomplete, since my English medical terminology is lacking and I was simply not able to translate the more complicated scientific phrases into proper English:

    * causes cytotoxicity in liver cells
    * causes formation of radicals from enzymes of leucocytes, with the consequence of cytotoxic reactions
    * considerably weakens the immune system
    * possible mutagenic effects
    * damages the natural vitamin K cycle
    * has no effect on coumarin derivatives, which are often present in commercial food due to mold contamination (toxic when ingested)
    * causes hemolytic anemia and hyperbilirubinemia, not just linked to large doses
    * disturbs the level of calcium ions (Ca2+) in the body, which is an important factor fibrinolysis
    * is directly toxic in high doses (vomiting, albuminuria), unlike natural vitamin K
    * builds up in tissue and has been detected in eggs, meat and milk of animals supplemented with menadione derivatives
    * causes irritation of skin and mucous membranes
    * causes allergic reactions and eczema

    &quot;He is your friend, your partner, your defender, your dog. You are his life, his love, his leader. He will be yours, faithful and true, to the last beat of his heart. You owe it to him to be worthy of such devotion.&quot;<br />Author Unknown

  12. #10
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    imported_Nick is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: Food Analysis

    "Thoroughly research any item with an ingredient list that claims a "source of vitamin K", "source of vitamin K activity" or "vitamin K" in parentheses and contact the manufacturer if you have any questions.
    Quite a few of the "premium" foods do this. I believe they've stopped using menadione, but Wellness used to use that wording instead of menadione.

    Having said that, I'm a little hesitant to jump on the anti-Vitamin K3 bandwagon. From what research I've read (which I'm no expert on this), the negative effects are due to excessive amounts of menadione. There's actually research that shows it may inhibit some cancers (bone cancer for one). You're not likely to run into high doses, that's one of the reason AAFCO establishes guidelines for amounts of vitamins, minerals, percentages of fat, protein, etc. It's another reason why it's important to always make sure your foods are formulated and tested according to AAFCO standards. Menadione is converted to menaquinone (Vitamin K2), so I'm not sure how long it stays in the water-soluble form as Vitamin K is a fat soluble vitamin.

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