does anyone feed these?
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13

Thread: does anyone feed these?

  1. #1
    chocolabmum Guest

    Defaultdoes anyone feed these?

    I am thinking of switiching to a different brand of dog food. My lab's coat is looking dull. I tried to switch over to the fish foods but that was a disaster. The dog didn't really like it and she smelt like a fish too! She has been eating Eukaunba LBA.

    Has anyone tried Pro Plan lamb or nutro chicken and rice formula??
    Figured the lamb might help with the allergies??? or try nutro which I have heard is good for skin issues?


    Which would be better for skin troubles?

  2. Remove Advertisements
    JustLabradors.com
    Advertisements
     

  3. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    68

    DefaultRe: does anyone feed these?

    Well, I'm sure each dog responds differently to foods. I feed Louie Nutro Chicken Meal/Rice/Oatmeal formula because he had the runs on anything else. His coat is looking better, too, but the other foods didn't really have a chance to prove they could give the same results to his coat because as I mentioned he had the runs before the Nutro Chicken.

    Good luck on the switch though!

  4. #3
    Trickster's Avatar
    Trickster is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    7,913

    DefaultRe: does anyone feed these?

    If your dog has skin troubles you might want to look for something with a low grain content. Hypo-allergenic diets are your best bet --my dogs really thrive on it. Out of the two products you named, Nutro is probably the better choice. That said, both Nutro and ProPlan are "middle of the road" foods and your dog could do well on either. You don't know until you try. Just bear in mind that there are other good choices of food available.*

  5. Remove Advertisements
    JustLabradors.com
    Advertisements
     

  6. #4
    chocolabmum Guest

    DefaultRe: does anyone feed these?

    You mention to maybe try a food that is more low grain type. What brands are low grain type? Would feeding a regular grain type food be ok if I just add extra cooked meat to it?


  7. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    38

    DefaultRe: does anyone feed these?

    If your looking for dog food thats great for dogs with skin problems. I would stick with premium dog food, like California Natural or Eagle Pack Holistic.. But if I had to choose from the two you listed.. I would have to be Nutro.. :-\

  8. #6
    chocolabmum Guest

    DefaultRe: does anyone feed these?

    My lab doesn't seem to do well on the food that the breeder recommends. She feeds like iams with raw hamburger.

    My lab is itchy often and chews at her feet too. My vet says that she is allergic and needs a different food to help relieve the allergic load. I have tried to feed the fish food but it was a diasater, she still itched and smelt like fish. She really didn't like it either.

    I have searched on the net and there was an article about acidolphulus that helped some dogs allergies. Has anyone tried this? Would that be yogurt or the pills??

  9. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    38

    DefaultRe: does anyone feed these?

    Have you considered trying a Holistic dog food? You should check out California Natural or Eagle Pack Holistic (which I stated above). I've read that labs with allergies have done wonderful on those foods. Have you considered adding fish oil to your dogs diet? Fish oil promotes healthy skin and coat.

    *Click on the dog food name, it will take you to their website.

  10. #8
    chocolabmum Guest

    DefaultRe: does anyone feed these?

    I have just checked out the eagle pack site. Which one do you think would be best to start with for a dog with a lot of allergies? Which one have you heard works best? Thanks for the recommend.

  11. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    38

    DefaultRe: does anyone feed these?

    I think all of Eagle Pack Holistic foods are excellent. Which one to choose is up to you. What's your dog allergic too? If you want to stay away from Chicken or Lamb, then go with Duck and Oatmeal or the Anchovy, Sardine & Salmon Meal. You just have try and figure out what works great for your dog.. If your dog does horrible on Eagle Pack, then you might want to consider California Natural. Choosing dog food can be a little difficult, especially if your dog has food allergies..

    I'm curious.. Which fish food did you try? I fed my lab Cali. Natural Herring and Sweet Potato and she never smells like fish.. She also loves the taste, but I think it's because I've been giving her Omega-3 Fish oil since she was 3 months old.


  12. #10
    Labs4me is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    300

    DefaultRe: does anyone feed these?

    Quote Originally Posted by chocolabmum
    I have just checked out the eagle pack site.* Which one do you think would be best to start with for a dog with a lot of allergies?* Which one have you heard works best?* Thanks for the recommend.

    I thought this was interesting and didn't know if you had seen it when looking at Eagle's web site. Some interesting info on allergies taken from the following web site: http://www.eaglepack.com/Pages/EP_Pe...html#allergies
    PROACTIVE APPROACH TO RESOLVING SKIN, EAR, AND EYE ALLERGIES, SENSITIVE DIGESTIVE SYSTEMS, FOOD INTOLERANCE*

    “…my pet has been experiencing ear problems, (redness and itchiness), hot spots, lick sores and thickening of the skin where she constantly licks. This has gone on for two years and no one has an answer”. Other comments received from concerned pet owners include yeast infection in the ears, itching, swollen feet, lips, eyelids, ears and tongue, wheezing, coughing, weepy eye discharge, itching tail that has turned from chocolate to white where she licks, large portions of her body where all hair has been licked away and the skin is red, staph infection, crusty skin, sores on the muzzle and lips. Other comments include, “We have constant loose stools and diarrhea.” and “I’ve spent $3000 and still don’t have an answer”.

    Owners have fed expensive vet recommended diets that don’t always work. Many owners rebel at the ingredients (ethoxyquin, peanut hulls, wheat mids, soy, by-products, corn as the first ingredient). Sometimes pets won’t eat the food. Owners have administered all kinds of medication, used topical shampoos, injectable and oral glucocorticoids, antihistamines, corticosteroids / prednizone, with mixed results. What relief they do get is often temporary. “The poor dog lives in an Elizabethan collar”, said another pet owner. What’s a pet owner to do?

    SKIN ALLERGIES
    Option 1: Medications and Testing
    Traditional approaches focus more on control of symptoms through use of medication. It seeks to diagnose and address the symptoms, not the root cause, which means the allergy and medication can continue indefinitely.
    Option 2: Natural-Holistic Approach
    Our Holistic approach seeks to address the problem nutritionally. Addressed correctly, the allergy will usually resolve and medication can normally be discontinued. Our philosophy is to start first with a holistic, whole-health, nutritional approach to resolving the root cause of the problem. There is far more to resolving allergy and digestive problems than eliminating the offending ingredient, usually a protein source. (1)

    Eagle Pack Nutritional Approach To Resolving Dermatologic Allergies—
    First, be certain to rule out fleas. If the reaction is year-round, the problem is probably diet related. If the problem is during the summer ‘allergy’ months only, then pollens, etc. may be the primary cause. Sometimes airborne allergies and food related allergies enforce each other. Finding the correct diet may reduce the intensity of the allergy but will not resolve it 100 percent. It is hard to know in advance how a pet will respond to a particular diet. You should see an improvement within 60-days and the problem will often resolve 100%. If your first selection is not effective select from among the other recommendations. For dogs and cats, do NOT feed anything else during the recovery period…NO table scraps, treats, biscuits, rawhide, supplements, chewable medications (unless vital for other reasons and ask your vet if it can be delayed for 30 days), chewies, rawhide. NOTHING, until the problem is resolved.
    Science suggests feeding diets with a single protein and a single carbohydrate source. Avoid beef, wheat, soy and dairy, which account for over 68% of skin allergy problems. The diet should be highly digestible and contain high vitamin and mineral levels. The following Eagle Pack diets, kibble and canned, excel in these areas:

    Dogs
    Holistic Select® Anchovy, Sardine & Salmon Meal w/Oatmeal Formula
    Holistic Select® Duck Meal & Oatmeal formula
    Holistic Select® Lamb Meal & Rice with Oatmeal

    Cats
    Holistic Select® Duck Meal & Oatmeal
    Holistic Select® Anchovy, Sardine & Salmon Meal w/Oatmeal Formula

    Top of Page

    Food Intolerance/Sensitive Digestive Systems—
    Food intolerance, sensitive stomach, IBD, IBS, Cystitis, Colitis, Pancreatic Insufficiency, Pancreatitis, diarrhea, vomiting food & bile. While science does not fully understand the causes, the nutrition approach to resolving these problems is the same. Understand the problem(s) can return, regardless of formula fed. If it does return, use our Holistic Solution™ powder (link) for life.

    “…lifelong bouts of bloody diarrhea, loose stools…I have been to 9 vets and no one has an answer”, said one owner. Others say their pet vomits or has frothy throw up at least once a week, or they bemoan how much gas a Great Dane can pass…”clears the room”, said one owner. “My dog has IBD”, said another. Some of these issues may be diet related or your pet may have worms, parasites, or a blockage. You will want to have your pet’s stool checked.

    Science suggests several approaches for managing diarrhea associated with the listed issues. Highly digestible, low residue foods, fiber enhanced foods and elimination foods i.e. a single protein and carbohydrate diet and foods that reduce intestinal irritation / inflammation. When feeding, divide the daily amount fed into 3-4 meals daily. The following Eagle Pack diets** combine the 4 approaches, and excel in these areas:

    Dogs
    Natural Formula—for dogs with sensitive tummies, loose stools, mild diarrhea, and persnickety digestive systems. This diet has worked well for GSD, Boxers.
    For all other issues detailed above…
    Maintenance Formula
    Holistic Select® Anchovy, Sardine & Salmon Meal Formula with Oatmeal
    Holistic Select® Duck Meal & Oatmeal

    Cats
    Holistic Select® Duck Meal & Oatmeal

    Never vary the diet. Divide the daily amount in half and feed morning and evening. Most problems should resolve in 3-5 days. During this period be consistent in your feeding schedule; do not feed anything else; nothing.

    Top of Page

    Holistic Transition™ and Holistic Solution™
    During the 7-day transition from other brands to Eagle Pack, feed Eagle Pack Holistic Transition™. For more serious issues like IBD or Exocrine Pancreatic Insufficiency, use Holistic Solution for life.
    Additional Suggestions If Problems Are Severe—
    Use this link to learn more on causes and possible cures and yeast and staph infection: Linda Arndt
    In cases of advanced skin allergies, supplement with Omega 3 fish oils

    If you have central air in your home buy the very best filter (about $17 U.S.D.)

    Analyze vinyl floor, carpet, carpet cleaners and shampoos, washing machine detergents/softeners if your pet sleeps on anything that you treat or wash.

    Water your lawn immediately after you cut it and try to keep the pet off it for a few hours. Hose down patios, decks, and walkways daily during pollen season.

    Be aware of contact with insecticides and fertilizers. Does your neighbor’s application go over the property line and your pet then eats grass along the fence line?


    (2) The Science Behind Resolving Allergies and Food Intolerance
    There is an abundance of peer reviewed research indicating that there is far more to resolving allergies and food intolerance than feeding diets with novel proteins. Our diets have several unique characteristics listed in texts, but not found in either prescription or non-prescription diets.

    Highest digestibility--Veterinary texts (2) suggest feeding diets with a high protein digestibility, and suggest 87% as ‘high’. Animal protein meals used in Eagle Pack diets are 91-95% digestible. The less digested a food protein is, the greater the potential to incite an allergic response.

    Digestive Enzymes enhance the already high digestibility of Eagle Pack animal meal proteins.

    The gut is probably one of the largest immune systems in the body. Ingested food represents the greatest foreign challenge to the immune system. The defense against food-born allergies includes an effective mucosal barrier. Inflammation of the mucosal barrier predisposes the animal to the development of acquired food allergies. Barrier health can be enhanced when Probiotics (DFM’s) and Prebiotics are included in the diet. Eagle Pack diets are the only diets that list FDA/AAFCO mandated Probiotic/DFM guarantees on the bag.

    Aids for resolving IBD include avoiding gas-producing foods. Our highly digestible protein meals, inclusion of Probiotics/DFM’s, Prebiotics and Digestive Enzymes, improve digestion and reduce gas.

    (1) Proteins, not fat, normally cause allergies. A pet can be seriously allergic to chicken, but not chicken fat. Ten documented case studies incriminated beef, dairy products and wheat as accounting for 68% of reported allergy cases. Soy is one of 4 ingredients causing 25% of recorded cases. Soy is known for causing gas. Corn is often incriminated as causing adverse food reactions but in 10 different peer reviewed studies it was not listed in the top 68% or the next 25% of ingredients causing adverse reactions.

    Gluten enteropathy (celiac disease, an inflammatory disease of the small intestine), affects the Irish Setter. Prolamins of wheat, rye and barley have marked sequence homology but not prolamins of rice or corn, which do not exacerbate the disorder. (Small Animal Clinical Nutrition IV)

    (2) Small Animal Clinical Nutrition IV


    *The approaches noted in this outline follow accepted advanced nutrition recommendations for addressing these problems. Pet owners must understand that some diseases like IBD may recur regardless of food fed. Approaches are provided as a guideline in working with your vet. Research and the science supporting our recommendations are documented for veterinarian review. Your vet is also encouraged to discuss any questions with our Director Of Nutritional Services or our Staff Veterinarian.
    Bonnie ~ Ellsworth Labradors
    Home to Ellsworth's Playing For Keeps CGC, U-CH SHR Ellsorth's Absolut Pleasure, Ellsworth's Good Luck Charm
    Gone but not forgotten: Franklin's Lucy of Ellsworth; Franklin's Rare Treat; U-CD Franklin's Rockin' Robin CDX, WC, CGC; Alpha-Omega's Mustang Salli CDX, CGC

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25