10 Month old not eating
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Thread: 10 Month old not eating

  1. #1
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    Default10 Month old not eating

    My 10 month old lab has been an eating machine since we first got her (we call her hoover for short) I just recently bought a new bag of food (the same food she has been eating her whole life, Wellness Large Breed Puppy) and she is being very picky about it. I put her food bowl down and she just looks at me as if saying "what else ya got?" This problem started 2 days ago, she wouldnt eat her breakfast at first when she normally eats it as fast as she can then about 15 minutes later she broke down and ate it. She did the same thing at lunch and wouldnt eat it at first and I had to keep pointing at it and telling her to eat and she finally did after about 5 minutes of doing that, but then at dinner she decided she would just eat it as normal. But then the problem started all over again this morning and I decided to just pick up the bowl and give her nothing after about 20 minutes of leaving it out and her not touching it.
    Her poops and peeing are all normal so I know this isnt a digestive issue.
    I thought maybe its the food bag (something wrong with this particular bag thats got an off smell)
    Or I thought maybe all of a sudden she is just a picky eater.
    Does anyone have any thoughts on this and what I should do?

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  3. #2
    BigBrownDog is offline Senior Member
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    It might be the bag of food, it might be that she is going through some adjustments and needs less food right now - are you still feeding 3 times a day? She is probably not in need of that mid day meal anymore at 10 months old. 2x a day should be plenty since her growth has slowed down.

    I would not force the issue. Try another bag of food (I'd get a small bag) and see if she reacts differently. If she is still reluctant to eat, she is just being an adolescent. The rule is to leave the food on the floor for 5 minutes - if she does not eat pick up the bowl. Try her again at the next meal time and if she still turns up her nose pick it up again. Your dog will not starve herself.

    If you start adding tastier stuff or coaxing her into eating you can make her a truly picky eater.
    Sharon, Blaise and Diesel.

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    HersheyK's Dad's Avatar
    HersheyK's Dad is offline Senior Member
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    Personally, I would get another bag of the same food, a small bag and at a different store, checking the date son the bag you have and making sure the new bag you get is fresher. Test it on your dog. If she takes it as she used to, the bag you have would be going back to where you got it and reported as having gone bad.
    Hershey Kisses, In charge of getting Ed out to the dog park so that he gets some exercise.

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  6. #4
    Luvmydog2much's Avatar
    Luvmydog2much is offline Senior Member
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    I'd check the food and call the company.
    'Don't grow up too quickly, lest you forget how much you love the beach.'
    ~ Michelle Held


    Rhys, Ruby and Nola

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    momofalab is offline Senior Member
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    I had a bag of food spoil on me before, I agree with other posters...get another bag, and see if that helps.

    -Shannon

  8. #6
    Bob Pr. is offline Senior Member
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    If it's not the food (test by trying a fresh small bag of exactly the same food) then I strongly suspect it's the maturation process.

    Below is a copy of a post I've often made when this comes up.



    IF the food is fresh and the age is 10 months or less, I suspect it's a streak of emerging "self-regulation." Below are exceprts that I've posted before to others who've reported the same thing:

    I understand your worry, because I went through that with my Puff, although with her it was at about 8-9 months of age. However, there are such remarkable variations in the rates of development of Labs, it is almost certainly a similar thing.

    Not to worry -- instead, REJOICE !!

    It was through this that I discovered my Puff is largely a self-regulator of her food intake. That puts her in the minority; most Labs are gluttons and some could easily kill or injure themselves by over-eating if given a chance. Self-regulating (according to a poll I conducted on JL several years ago, responded to by about 70 owners) is only found in about 10% of Labs. And, at that, it applies only to regular kibble and not to steak, fish, cat food, horse manure, etc.

    Puff had gone from eating about a cup of food a day when she was 6 lbs at 9 weeks age to eating 5 cups/day (divided into 2 meals) at 8-9 months. Then she stopped eating for a couple days and when she did eat, she ate only part of her food.

    I looked up puppy nutrition in several dog vet books, The UC-Davis "Book of Dogs" says, for instance, that when puppies are very young they need to eat about 2X the amount of food that an adult dog of that same weight would need.

    BUT, as they approach maturity, that need multiplier decreases from 2X down to 1X -- with 1X meaning they need the same amount an adult dog of that weight should eat.

    I measured the amount Puff did eat when she resumed eating and made available only that amount for 15 minute periods.

    She ate that amount. That lasted a bit and then she stopped eating again. I decreased the amount again.

    Puff finally went from 5 cups/day down to her current 2 cups/day (divided into 2 meals; but supper has green beans added to that amount of kibble).

    I suggest you count yourself lucky and begin decreasing the amounts you feed until you reach a stable balance.


    And another:

    The first time it happened with Puff, she pretty much ignored food (except a few nibbles on irresistible treats) for a couple days.
    It was then that I began really reading and absorbing what the vet books said. My first Lab, Bess, never met anything edible she didn't want to eat (except raw onions and raw mushrooms), so I was as unprepared for a Lab refusing to eat as I would be if seeing her fly.

    But -- if it'll be any comfort to you -- in nature, feral dogs and wild canids often go for a couple days (but not always by choice) without eating food and then stock up when fortune favors them with scavenging a carcass.

    Suggestions:
    1. measure and reduce by 1/4 the amount of food you've usually fed at a meal;
    2. measure anything left so you can deduct that amount from the next meals offered;
    3. continue to feed the reduced amount until ______ again skips some meals;
    4. repeat steps 1, 2, & 3 as it becomes needed (it may happen several more times);
    5. IF you do notice unusual behavior (listlessness, generalized apathy, loss of activity and interest, etc.) DO take ____ to see your vet.
    Puff [YF, AKC field line (from competing HT/FT breeder) 62 lbs, dob: 8-'01]

    Bess [BF, AKC bench line (from competing show breeder) 55 lbs., 1967-1981] "Poor Bess, the Wonder Dog":
    http://forum.justlabradors.com/showt...?p=748#post748

  9. #7
    Bob Pr. is offline Senior Member
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    I thought maybe its the food bag (something wrong with this particular bag thats got an off smell)
    And just in case it's related to the food, there's this, too:

    When Puff's increased appetite declined and leveled off after her developmental months, I noticed she shunned her food when a 40 lb. sack was half gone.

    After much experimenting with fresh bags of food, different containers, etc., I finally settled on the method decribed below as the easiest and best for us.

    Puff eats only 1 cup in the morning and 1 cup at night so a bag that size lasts us a l--o--n--g time, months. Air and moisture getting to food can make it unappetizing (as for example, crackers or cookies left exposed for weeks to air and humidity). While, rigid containers did somewhat extend the food life for us, they didn't completely work, I think because as the volume of the food gradually goes down, it gets replaced by air with its humidity (which is the culprit in causing loss of appeal).

    Our method:
    I buy 40 lb./18.14 kg. bags (Costco's Kirkland C&R) and, as soon as the bag is opened, I transfer the contents to 10-11 ZipLock freezer bags, sucking as much air as possible out of them before sealing it the last inch/3 cms.

    Five bags I put in the freezer, five I store in the emptied food bag. When we get down to the last few meals from the last bag left out, I remove a bag from the freezer and let it reach room temperature before opening it.

    And after opening a ZipLock bag to take out the food, I reseal it often sucking more air out.


    Puff [YF, AKC field line (from competing HT/FT breeder) 62 lbs, dob: 8-'01]

    Bess [BF, AKC bench line (from competing show breeder) 55 lbs., 1967-1981] "Poor Bess, the Wonder Dog":
    http://forum.justlabradors.com/showt...?p=748#post748

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