egg shells
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Thread: egg shells

  1. #1
    astigma is offline Junior Member
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    Defaultegg shells

    My 13-14 week old puppy got into the garbage can today and ate a bunch of egg shells while I was at work. I came home and noticed he'd puked on the couch and had diarrhea all over the house (not uncommon for him to poop in the house, but uncommon to have diarrhea). and in one "pile" I noticed something red, which may or not be blood. Should I go get him checked out or will he be fine after they've all passed?

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  3. #2
    imported_Nick's Avatar
    imported_Nick is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: egg shells

    The acid in his stomach will easily digest the shells - even household vinegar will do it, so I wouldn't worry about that end. Perhaps it did irritate his esophagus. I'd keep an eye on him, it very well could've been something else he ate and not blood.

  4. #3
    pluto is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: egg shells

    People do feed egg shells to dogs so they really dont have a problem with it.

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  6. #4
    imported_Nick's Avatar
    imported_Nick is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: egg shells

    Quote Originally Posted by pluto
    People do feed egg shells to dogs so they really dont have a problem with it.
    Yes, but it is a horrible idea for puppies. They don't need the extra calcium (which I understood the orginal poster meant it was an accident, but I just wanted to make the point about calcium).

  7. #5
    pluto is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: egg shells

    Quote Originally Posted by Nick
    Quote Originally Posted by pluto
    People do feed egg shells to dogs so they really dont have a problem with it.
    Yes, but it is a horrible idea for puppies.* They don't need the extra calcium (which I understood the orginal poster meant it was an accident, but I just wanted to make the point about calcium).
    Nick I am glad you mentioned extra calcium and how it might have long term negative effects. However most people do give that extra so that the dog becomes big and wins at shows..A pathetic school of thought really but something specially fuelled by some judges who'll basicaslly award CC's to bigger pup in its group..Pluto was growing rather fast(His genetics is such that most in his family grow fast) so I had to put a tap on his food intake however most people would not do this as they think it is a good thing and I aint talking about ametuers but plenty of the so called experts do the same.

  8. #6
    Labs4me is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: egg shells

    Actually with egg shells if the extra calcium is not needed by the dog's body it will come out the other end.
    Bonnie ~ Ellsworth Labradors
    Home to Ellsworth's Playing For Keeps CGC, U-CH SHR Ellsorth's Absolut Pleasure, Ellsworth's Good Luck Charm
    Gone but not forgotten: Franklin's Lucy of Ellsworth; Franklin's Rare Treat; U-CD Franklin's Rockin' Robin CDX, WC, CGC; Alpha-Omega's Mustang Salli CDX, CGC

  9. #7
    imported_Nick's Avatar
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    DefaultRe: egg shells

    Quote Originally Posted by Labs4me
    Actually with egg shells if the extra calcium is not needed by the dog's body it will come out the other end.
    We're talking about a puppy (13-14 weeks old), so it doesn't. Until sometime after 6 months of age, puppies do not have a mechanism to rid their bodies of extra calcium. The literature is quite clear that this buildup of calcium in the bones (that's the only place they have to store it) is detrimental to growth rates (they grow too fast), and if the genes are present, it increases the risk of hip dysplasia. Puppies should be fed a diet that is not too high in calcium.

    Diseases like the osteochondroses, hip dysplasia, panosteitis, and even hypertrophic osteodystrophy have nutritional influences,1,2 although genetics, trauma, and infection can also play an important role. For example, the cause of panosteitis appears to be a combination of factors, but it occurs primarily in fast-growing long bones. If we can manage the rate of growth of those bones, we may be able to decrease the incidence of panosteitis in growing puppies. In addition, researchers have documented that increased calcium supplementation alters the accumulation of calcium in the bones and may cause altered bony structure.3 These alterations affect the diameter of the nutrient foramen in the bone, a small opening in the bone that allows blood vessels to enter the marrow cavity, leading to decreased incoming blood flow, and panosteitis may result. The osteochondroses, hip dysplasia, and other developmental bone diseases all have similar nutritional factors as part of their development.

    The nutrients most studied in relation to developmental skeletal problems in puppies are calcium, calories, and protein. Of these, only calcium and caloric intakes have been documented to have a causative effect. Dietary protein levels have no effect on the development of skeletal problems in the growing dog when caloric intake is controlled.4 In fact; normal protein levels are needed by growing puppies to help develop optimal lean body mass. Elevated dietary calcium intake, either through supplementation or overfeeding of commercial foods, can be a causative factor in many of these conditions.5 These associations between dietary factors and skeletal problems have led to a large number of studies on the nutrition of the larger breeds, and especially the large breed puppy.6-10 These studies documented that improper feeding during growth is associated with several skeletal disorders in the dogs.
    Calcium Studies

    Ca and P concentrations in the diet of young Great Dane puppies are rapidly reflected in the bone mineral content of the puppies until 5 to 6 months of age, after which hormonal regulation adjusts absorption and excretion of these minerals. Appropriate Ca and P concentrations in diets are important in young puppies < 6 months of age.
    Calcium Study
    Calcium Study

  10. #8
    einstein's legacy is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: egg shells

    This is the first time I've ever heard of feeding eggshells to dogs. I would imagine that if a dog needs more calcium a vitamin would do it. Really, eggshells????

  11. #9
    imported_Nick's Avatar
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    DefaultRe: egg shells

    Oh yeah, Jes gets one raw egg a week...more during the winter (but no shell because I don't want to offset the Ca:Ph ratio). Eggs are the most digestible protein source. In fact, all other protein sources are measured compared to eggs (the biological value of a protein ranges from 0 to 1 with eggs being 1). The shells are easily digested, so unless calcium is a concern it's just an added nutrient (or whatever you consider calcium).

  12. #10
    Labs4me is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: egg shells

    Nick, I am only talking about eggs and the shell, here not any other form of calcium. In Wendy Volard's book "The Holistic Guide for a Healthy Dog" she states that "The shell is a pure form of calcium, and a dog going through a growth spurt may need extra. If needed, the eggshell is utilized; if not, it passes right through and you see it in the dog's stool...do not feed eggs more than 3 times a week."
    Bonnie ~ Ellsworth Labradors
    Home to Ellsworth's Playing For Keeps CGC, U-CH SHR Ellsorth's Absolut Pleasure, Ellsworth's Good Luck Charm
    Gone but not forgotten: Franklin's Lucy of Ellsworth; Franklin's Rare Treat; U-CD Franklin's Rockin' Robin CDX, WC, CGC; Alpha-Omega's Mustang Salli CDX, CGC

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