senior lab owners
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Thread: senior lab owners

  1. #1
    lab13 Guest

    Defaultsenior lab owners

    Our new vet says that we HAVE to put our 10 1.2 yr old lab on senior food. No reason given other than because it is for senior dogs. She has been on chicken Eukanuba and pro plan but since she has some skin issues I was thinking of trying her on the Pro Plan either turkey, lamb or fish food.
    New vet says NO as it isn't a senior food.

    Does anyone with a senior dog feed Pro Plan Lamb, turkey or the fish based food? Any problems on them??

    This is frustrating, our breeder doesn't feed senior to her labs either but she is feeding the chicken.

    If I do decide to try one of them, which would be the best one to go to from the chicken??

    Thanks as always.

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  3. #2
    labby's Avatar
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    DefaultRe: senior lab owners

    gosh these vets just drive me crazy. i have one lab on senior and that is boomer. i recently switched her since she has been having nausea issues and the senior is suppose to be easier to digest.

    up until 2 days ago boomer was on the turkey and doing great on it. the rest of my seniors are either on the turkey or the fish based foods. my vet and i both agree that if the dog isn't having any issues, regular food is fine for seniors. boomer might get switched back to the turkey if i don't like what i see on the senior. oh and she's getting the regular proplan senior not the large breed.

    EDIT: just wanted to let you know there is now a senior dog section here in case you haven't seen it.





    Laura





  4. #3
    lab13 Guest

    DefaultRe: senior lab owners

    Thanks Labby for the info and I didn't know about the senior section too.

    I will check out the turkey or fish one for my lab.

    Happy Easter

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  6. #4
    Caseys Mom Guest

    DefaultRe: senior lab owners

    I switched my old guy, Hershey (about 15), from PP C&R to PP SS&S a couple of years ago. He's always had very dry skin and been just a bit itchy so I thought I'd see if the fish based food would help. Wow! Big difference! His coat is looking the best it ever has and I've been able to stop giving him the supplement I used to give for his white flakies. Since Hershey was doing so well on the SS&S, I went ahead and switched my younger Lab to it about 6 months later.

    I also haven't ever put any of my seniors on the special senior food and my vet's attitude has been "if it ain't broke, don't fix it." Aside from the digestibility issue Labby mentions, the one other time I can think of that you might want to consider senior food is if your Lab has kidney disease. The lower protein levels are supposed to be good for failing kidneys.

    Good luck on the food roller-coaster!

  7. #5
    labby's Avatar
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    DefaultRe: senior lab owners

    actually most senior foods these days have the same amount of protein, but lower fat levels. they've found over the years that the lower protein doesn't help kidneys and it causes muscle decrease.

    found the study i was looking for in my files

    Dietary Protein for older dogs
    New Science Challenges Years-Old Notions About Protein’s Role in Cat & Dog Nutrition


    Both old and new research have led to advancements in our understanding of dietary protein. The Nestlé Purina PetCare Research Centers (in St. Louis, MO; Gray Summit, MO; St. Joseph, MO; and Amiens, France) have conducted internal research and sponsored external research studies related to dietary protein and its application to veterinary medicine. Numerous studies conducted in companion animals (through all life stages and under different physiological conditions) have provided new species-specific results that validate the benefits of optimal dietary protein. This new science as well as that from independent research has put to rest many of the fallacies surrounding dietary protein.


    The following research summaries will demonstrate that:
    1) protein at any level consistent with complete and balanced nutrition has no adverse effects on the kidneys of normal, healthy dogs.
    2) increasing dietary protein spares lean body mass in older dogs.
    3) increasing dietary protein is important for successful weight loss.
    4) modified proteins offer a more effective way to manage food hypersensitivity.
    5) diabetic cats should be fed a diet high in dietary protein and low in carbohydrates to help moderate glucose levels.


    If you have questions about this information, please contact the Purina Veterinary Resource Center by calling toll-free 1-800-222-8387 weekdays 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. CT.

    OLD OBSERVATIONS:
    Excess protein causes kidney damage in dogs.

    NEW REVELATIONS:
    Protein at any level, consistent with complete and balanced nutrition, has no adverse effects on the kidneys of normal, healthy dogs.

    The primary concern regarding excess dietary protein in older dogs has focused on kidney function. It was suggested by Brenner that excess dietary protein would induce kidney damage, based on extrapolating research conducted in rodents. Subsequent research suggested that the benefits attributed to protein restriction were actually secondary to the reduced calorie intake associated with low protein diets.

    I. Research in dogs with renal failure.

    *Kronfeld published a critical review of 27 diets used in four clinical trials and 8 experiments and grouped each by protein content, as percent of dietary metabolizable energy (ME)4:

    1) high (38-49% ME)
    2) moderate (20-31% ME)
    3) low (12-16% ME)
    4) very low (7-9% ME)

    *In dogs with chronic renal failure, responses were undesirable with the high or very low protein diets.

    *Moderate protein diets (up to 34% of diet or 31% of energy) had no detrimental effects in dogs with chronic renal failure and were associated with general improvement over dogs fed high or very low (less than 10% of energy) protein diets.

    *Excessive restriction of dietary protein (<10%) was associated with adverse effects in dogs with chronic renal failure.

    II. In uninephrectomized older dogs (6-8 years of age) fed a dry diet containing either 18% or 34% protein or a canned diet containing 22-36% protein on a dry matter basis for four years, no adverse effects from dietary protein were observed.

    III. Research in healthy geriatric dogs.

    *Kealy et al. reported that healthy, geriatric dogs fed a 45% protein diet maintained health and body condition, with no evidence of increased kidney damage due to protein intake.

    OLD OBSERVATIONS:
    Older dogs should consume less protein.

    NEW REVELATIONS:
    Increasing dietary protein spares lean body mass in older dogs.

    Decreasing dietary protein levels for senior dogs may not be appropriate. Older dogs appear to be less efficient in metabolizing dietary protein compared to younger animals. In order to maintain protein reserves and maximize protein turnover rates, older dogs may thus require more dietary protein than their younger counterparts.

    I. Lean body mass decreases with age.

    *Numerous studies in multiple species have shown that increased dietary protein intake can slow the age-associated loss in lean body mass.

    *Decreases in lean body mass can be detrimental. The skeletal musculature plays a critical role in recovery from trauma or infection.

    *Skeletal muscle and skin proteins are he primary source of endogenous proteins involved in protein turnover. Protein turnover is a dynamic process of catabolism and synthesis of endogenous protein, which takes place almost continuously in all cells.

    *Protein turnover helps animals adapt to their ever-changing environment by maintaining a readily available supply of amino acids necessary to produce proteins or enzymes needed at any given time. A reduction in protein turnover can lead to decreased immune comptetnce and increased susceptibility to stresses such as infection and injury.

    *Kealy et al. compared the effect of feeding either 16.5% or 45% dietary protein in healthy, older dogs. While all dogs lost lean body mass with age, the rate of decline was significantly reduced by feeding a higher dietary protein level.

    II. Maintenance energy requirements (MER) decrease with age.

    *Using older dogs, Powanda reported a significant age-related decline in maintenance energy requirements (MER).

    *This decrease in MER was associated with a decline in physical activity levels and approximated a 20% decline in MER.

    III. Older dogs require an increased percentage of calories from protein.

    *Laflamme et al. reported a 25% reduction in MER with age in dogs.

    *To meet the senior dog’s increased protein requirement while avoiding excess calorie intake, senior dog diets should be formulated with an increased protein:calorie ratio. Nestlé Purina recommends at least 25% of calories as protein in diets for older dogs.


    Laura





  8. #6
    Caseys Mom Guest

    DefaultRe: senior lab owners

    Very interesting! Thanks for posting that article, Laura. I was current as far as knowing protein doesn't cause kidney failure but this:
    Moderate protein diets (up to 34% of diet or 31% of energy) had no detrimental effects in dogs with chronic renal failure...
    is news to me and very good to know.

    Just cruised though the ProPlan site and I see they've got their Senior C&R up to 28% protein vs. 26% for the regular C&R. It sounds awfully high but maybe it's time for me to reevaluate and take another look at senior foods. I'll be interested to hear how Boomer does.


  9. #7
    labby's Avatar
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    DefaultRe: senior lab owners

    yeah the protein amount in the pp senior kinda wowed me too. i was a bit concerned but my vet was convinced that since purina spends so much in research, they knew what they were doing. even the eukanuba is up there in protein. purina and iams are the ones who do all the research and everyone else copies off of what they find. lol



    Laura





  10. #8
    lab13 Guest

    DefaultRe: senior lab owners

    Yesterday I went to check out the two Pro Plan diets - turkey and the fish based one. The clerk had run out of the turkey and she said that I should ask the vet about feeding my senior the fish diet by Pro Plan. It is supposed to be high in Magnesium which might be high for a senior dog. She starting talking about it being high for dogs that have had UTI's or kidney troubles. Mine hasn't had any of those troubles so would it be ok or should I wait for the turkey to come in this week???

    She said that the % of magnesium is around 18%. What should it be then?

    The diet is good for allergies or younger dogs than mine. Is she right or what??


  11. #9
    labby's Avatar
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    DefaultRe: senior lab owners

    you should call purina and ask them.



    Laura





  12. #10
    lab13 Guest

    DefaultRe: senior lab owners

    Labby - I will call them tomorrow.

    Does anyone know what a normal magnesium level is in maintenance dog food??

    Has anyone who has used the PRo Plan Fish diet had troubles with their labs and kidney function?? Maybe the clerk was mis- quoting?? I will let you know tomorrow.

    Happy Easter!!

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