Opinions into the effect of protein on bone formation.
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Thread: Opinions into the effect of protein on bone formation.

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    Samson is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultOpinions into the effect of protein on bone formation.

    You all know Pippa by now, and her mum took her to her first training class this week.

    The trainer advised her to avoid foods with too much protein saying that they promote bone growth too much and adversely affect bone formation causing HD and other issues. ( Pippa is on Royal Canin and this is what prompted the trainer to advise against feeding this. )

    My first thought was what a load of twaddle , but I'm no expert and would like more educated opinions

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    What is the protein level of that food, Colin?

    Wing-N-Wave Labradors Canine Nutrition

    If there is sufficient clinical evidence to suggest that high protein levels are essential for dogs with high energy output, there is equal evidence to suggest that high protein levels may be contraindicated in breeds which undergo rapid growth phases. Increase in nutritional skeletal diseases has closely paralleled the increase of high calorie, high protein diets in growing puppies. Besides producing a source of energy, protein intake directly effects growth rate. However, a direct relationship between high protein and bone disorders has not been clinically demonstrated. Rather, the correlation between high protein diets and skeletal diseases may lie in other related factors. For example, it has been clinically demonstrated that when puppies at risk for developing hip dysplasia were allowed to eat ad lib, they had a greater incidence of hip dysplasia than littermates who were placed on maintenance diets. Since protein content increases palatability, protein rich dog foods encourage an increase in food consumption. Therefore, puppies fed higher protein diets who are not limited in regard to the amount of food they consume are more prone to rapid growth phases and consequently skeletal disorders.



    Laura





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    Samson is offline Senior Member
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    That's exactly what we wanted to know Laura. I'll check exactly which RC she is feeding.

    Thank you.

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    Samson is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by labby View Post
    What is the protein level of that food, Colin?

    Wing-N-Wave Labradors Canine Nutrition

    If there is sufficient clinical evidence to suggest that high protein levels are essential for dogs with high energy output, there is equal evidence to suggest that high protein levels may be contraindicated in breeds which undergo rapid growth phases. Increase in nutritional skeletal diseases has closely paralleled the increase of high calorie, high protein diets in growing puppies. Besides producing a source of energy, protein intake directly effects growth rate. However, a direct relationship between high protein and bone disorders has not been clinically demonstrated. Rather, the correlation between high protein diets and skeletal diseases may lie in other related factors. For example, it has been clinically demonstrated that when puppies at risk for developing hip dysplasia were allowed to eat ad lib, they had a greater incidence of hip dysplasia than littermates who were placed on maintenance diets. Since protein content increases palatability, protein rich dog foods encourage an increase in food consumption. Therefore, puppies fed higher protein diets who are not limited in regard to the amount of food they consume are more prone to rapid growth phases and consequently skeletal disorders.
    Laura

    She's feeding RC Junior maxi which according to the blurb has 30% protein ?

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    Samson is offline Senior Member
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    So from Laura's blurb, I got that basically pups that are allowed to eat however much they want (likely causing them to be overweight) are at more risk for joint problems, not related to protein at all.

    I have nothing to back it up right at this moment, but I *know* I have read somewhere that the >protein = growth problems was a load of junk, originally based on critically flawed studies.
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    Well, this is anecdotal, only related to my feeding trial of one very spoiled and much loved puppy who was eating 28% protein food. (I don't consider this high)

    High Protein = HOD.

    How do I know? My puppy who wasn't on a high protein diet got HOD. But if you read up on it, to help relieve HOD you remove the protein. (We switched to Innova Giant Breed - HURL) And it worked. So conversely, it may be the protein that is causing it. Seriously. We fed a crappy food for 3 months and she's all fixed up.

    Not sure why I am saying this, because I wouldn't feed a lesser food unless there was an issue, but its still interesting to me.
    Last edited by Luvmydog2much; 03-02-2012 at 02:04 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Luvmydog2much View Post
    Well, this is anecdotal, only related to my feeding trial of one very spoiled and much loved puppy who was eating 28% protein food. (I don't consider this high) High Protein = HOD. How do I know? My puppy who wasn't on a high protein diet got HOD. But if you read up on it, to help relieve HOD you remove the protein. (We switched to Innova Giant Breed - HURL) And it worked. So conversely, it may be the protein that is causing it. Seriously. We fed a crappy food for 3 months and she's all fixed up. Not sure why I am saying this, because I wouldn't feed a lesser food unless there was an issue, but its still interesting to me.
    Thanks for the reply but what does the acronym HOD refer to - HD ?

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