Energy Level and Exercise?
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Thread: Energy Level and Exercise?

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    asanderd's Avatar
    asanderd is offline Junior Member
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    DefaultEnergy Level and Exercise?

    You all mention that with me being in an apartment, if I choose a Labrador, I would need to give it long walks. I'm thinking a hour in the morning, an hour mid day from a dog walker and then a good romp at the dog park and a 30 minute one before being in for the night. Would that be sufficient to keep energy and a good balanced level? Or should I do more or less. I'm just looking for what you would think an everyday average Labrador would need. A general idea is all. And thanks in advance!
    Actively researching Dogs!
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    That would be a decent start, but obviously adjusted up or down depending on the individual dog. A puppy isn't going to be able to go for hour walks, so they'll need many short trips outside as well as lots of indoor play, training and attention. Where in MI are you? Are you looking for a puppy or older dog? I notice your Siggy says must be a protector... That's not a lab.

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    Personally I think that would be a great start too! We specifically asked our breeder for the more low-energy pup of the litter, and Malone is SOO great for us, thus far. He'll go for a brisk 30 minute walk with me, or if there's days that it's just way too cold out, he'll be fine just hanging out on the couch with us. Labs are pretty adaptable. For your first dog (like me) I would aim for a low - medium energy dog. Easier to train/exercise....


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    Quote Originally Posted by nicole View Post
    That would be a decent start, but obviously adjusted up or down depending on the individual dog. A puppy isn't going to be able to go for hour walks, so they'll need many short trips outside as well as lots of indoor play, training and attention. Where in MI are you? Are you looking for a puppy or older dog? I notice your Siggy says must be a protector... That's not a lab.
    Nicole has some great advice.

    Other than when I went home during the summer in college (which is when I got Jes, about 8 years ago), he's always lived in an apartment. Some time around 9-12 months of age, walks did nothing for him. He required more strenuous exercise. I lived next to a park, so that was a great and convenient place to play fetch...and wide open so he would have to run a lot. When he was younger, shorter (and more frequent) walks combined with training kept him physically and mentally entertained. I think a lot of people underestimate the importance of mental stimulation for puppies, but it really did help.

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    Tanya is offline Senior Member
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    will vary depending on the dog obviously, as well as the age. As mentionned above pups will need shorter periods of exercise more often. A teenage lab will need more running/off leash time and an adult lab will be happy with walks and the evening park outing (off-leash).

    Agreed that labs are not protectors.
    Charlie (foster) and Rocky

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    SarahJN is offline Member
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    I know this sounds vague, and these guys have all given great advice (I'd forgotten the breeder could probably point you to a slightly less energetic pup if needs be). The basic is one walk in the morning (if you struggle with this ask someone else to help: I have to because of work and Uni) and one in the evening, with play either interspersed in-between, in the back yard or on the walk itself (most labs adore playing retrieving games with balls, frisbees and Kongs - the downside is that you spend more on balls in a year than you do on anything else except food, because your dog drops it or loses it the minute they see something interesting!)
    If you can get an extra walk in at lunch, great going! (Please be aware a puppy will need a small meal at midday and so this walk will allow the puppy to eliminate).
    You'll know if your dog is getting enough exercise because he'll stay trim, he'll sleep well and his bowel movements will be pretty regular (allowing, of course, for food he eats). He'll be eager for a walk but not bouncing off the walls (if he is, he might need more stimulation, but with at least two walks a day this is unlikely).
    Like Nicole said, puppies need much less exercise than adult dogs, and you can hit two birds with one stone by letting him play with other dogs once he's vaccinated, wormed and had his flea treatments, which will socialise him too, and totally knacker him out to boot!
    This is a great start. I'd say the lunchtime walk is a bonus, but not necessarily essential (as in older dogs, this might strain them, and in puppies means a very short walk), but the other two are essential for keeping the dog trim. I wish we'd started years ago!

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    Which ever breed I choose, It will be a rescue. And I'm thinking a 2-4 years old. I would like for my first dog, to be house trained and if I can find one that at the very least is okay on a crate and possibly has some lead manners. But if at the first walk I have a puller, I'll take it in stride and use what I know and go on a board to get advice.

    I didn't mention that I plan on getting a doggie Backpack. I know for a dogs whose never had a backpack, I have to start with an empty pack and slowly work my way up with small weight increments to a couple full bottles of water. And I also plan on using a near by facility who offers Obedience, Agility and Flyball. And all classes have beginner to intermediate classes.

    Also I plan on purchasing one of those nifty ball fling things that I've seen Cesar Millan using.

    I forgot to take Protector off my siggy. The only reason I put Protector down is when I do get the dog, it will also be my first apartment. On my own. One of the kids I baby sit has a female named Piper, that dog licks you to death when you come in the house! Now that being said, Miranda was out side and a dog came up running to her and Piper ran between Miranda and the other dog, teeth bared and fur on her back standing on end. Piper was not told to do this. She just did it because she was protecting her human. Piper is one of the nicest most gentlest dogs I know. So labs not being protectors are just a mark against getting a Lab. It is actually the only thing I have come up with as a mark against a Lab.
    Last edited by asanderd; 12-19-2010 at 12:02 PM.
    Actively researching Dogs!
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    How old are you?

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    Tanya is offline Senior Member
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    The one thing I want to say is: be realistic about your expections as far as lifestyle with a dog (any dog here, even if you opt for a dog that is not a lab).

    I don't know how active you currently are, but if you are not on a daily basis, don't imagine that just having a dog will magically make you happy about going out daily (ex: if you are not currently walking 1+ hour a day or running or taking agility classes or taking hikes) than be very very very careful about getting a dog with energy so you can do all these things. You may find yourself resenting having to do all this with the dog. You describe a great lifestyle with a dog but are you sure with a new job and a new apt you will still be as gung ho about this on a DAILY basis? A first new job can be tireing itself, on top of having all these plans you want to do with a dog.

    Also, if you go for a dog with energy, be careful as some dogs don't have an "off" switch. So it means you don't just do the 1+ hour of exercise on days you feel up to it, but you will never be able to skip more than 1 or two days before your dog is abit wacko.

    SOME dogs with high energy are also abit harder/or take more time to train. Not always, but sometimes that drive/energy takes more work to harness - which can be difficult for a first time dog owner (which if I remember correctly you would be, even if you have dog sat in the past).

    I just worry that you have a dream of what you will want to do with a dog but when you start your new job and get a dog it will be overwhelming. No matter the breed. Get a dog that fits what resembles your current lifestlye not your dream lifestyle.

    ETA: lastly, don't disregard mixes. if a dog is being fostered (and has been for a few weeks) you can get a good idea about the dog's temperment and needs. With rescues I find it best to look at individual dogs than "breeds". "breed" standards are great when looking at good breeders who breed for those standards (temperment) but with byb's it's a potluck.
    Last edited by Tanya; 12-19-2010 at 12:34 PM.
    Charlie (foster) and Rocky

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    BigBrownDog is offline Senior Member
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    Personally I think you should be on your own for a year before you consider adding a dog. You need to also have enough money saved to deal with emergencies if they arise. One e-vet visit could be $1000- or more. You don't want to be in your new apartment with your new dog and find out that you don't have adequate income to take proper care of the dog and still pay your bills.
    Sharon, Blaise and Diesel.

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