Glycoflex?
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Thread: Glycoflex?

  1. #1
    JimClark is offline Junior Member
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    DefaultGlycoflex?

    Our vet want's us to switch to Glycoflex (see below image) for our yellow lab. We have been using Costco G&C for a while but am confused because the Chondroitin is missing in the Glycoflex he recommends.
    Any comments to help me understand what is best for our dog?

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  3. #2
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    labby is offline Senior Member
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    I saved this from years ago at Acmepet. Someone was kind enough to explain the differences.

    For a glucosamine/chondroitin supplement, I really don't think there is any better than Cosequin. for any dog with HD, I think this should be part of the foundation of the supplementation program.

    However, I think that alot of dogs have alot of other problems -- I think there is a lack of circulation, a lack of muscle mass, and just a lack of nutrients in general needed to support the muscles and the rest of the body...the glycoflex, having perna muscle, brewer's yeast, and alfalfa is full of nutrients that most dogs don't get in their diet. I am not confident that there is enough of the high quality gluco/chond. in the glycoflex though.

    If one were using this for a dog with no symptoms, no apparent HD, then I think the glycoflex is fine. But for HD, I like using both.

    Here is a description of the ingredients of Glycoflex from Balch & Balch's Prescription for Nutritional Healing. I think it's an all around great supplement to help for circulation and muscle support. However, I don't think it can replace a glucosamine/chondroitin product.

    The green-lipped mussel (Perna canaliculus) is a species of edible shellfish. They contain numerous amino acids, the building blocks of body proteins, in addition to enzymes and essential trace elements. The minerals they contain are present in a balance similar to that in blood plasma, and these minerals are naturally chelated by the amino acids, making for better assimilation into the body.

    Sea mussel aids in the functioning of the cardiovascular system, the lymphatic system, the endocrine system, the eyes, connective tissues, and mucous membranes. They help to reduce inflammation and relieve the pain and stiffness of arthritis. They also promote the healing of wounds and burns.

    Alfalfa: One of the most mineral-rich foods known, alfalfa has roots that grow as much as 130 feet into the earth. Alfalfa is available in liquied extract form and is good to use while fasting because of its chlorophyll and nutrient content. It contains calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, potassim, plus virtually all known vitamins. The minerals are in a balanced form, which promotes absorption. These minerals are alkaline, but have a neutralizing effect on the intestinal tract.

    If you need a mineral supplement, alfalfa is a good choice. It has helped many arthritis sufferers. Alfalfa, wheatgrass, barley, and spirulina, all of which contain chlorophyll, have been found to aid in the healing of intestinal ulcers, gastritis, liver disorders, eczema, hemorrhoids, asthma, high blood pressure, anemia, constipation, body and breath odor, bleeding gums, infections, burns, athlete's foot, and cancer.

    Yeast is rich in many basic nutrients, such as the B vitamins (except for vitamin B-12), sixteen amino acids, and at least fourteen different minerals. The protein content of yeast is responsible for 52 percent of its weight. Yeast is also high in phosphorus.
    Live baker's yeast should be avoided. Live yeast cells actually deplete the body of B vitamins and other nutrients. In nutritional yeast (aka brewer's yeast, the ingredient in glycoflex), these live cells are destroyed, leaving the beneficial nutrients behind.



    Laura





  4. #3
    OhioAirDogs is offline Member
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    The absolute best, far superior to anything is steadfast...you will see the difference in a month, really see how it helps your dog: Arenus | Horse and Dog Health and Supplements | Assure and Steadfast

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  6. #4
    OhioAirDogs is offline Member
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    The absolute best, by a country mile supplement for joints is Steadfast: Arenus | Horse and Dog Health and Supplements | Assure and Steadfast

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