I thought that this was interesting and helpful.
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Thread: I thought that this was interesting and helpful.

  1. #1
    Samson is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultI thought that this was interesting and helpful.

    Please feel free to critisise the content which came from a DOGAGE email

    DogAge advises against feeding your dog raw meat, due to the risk of bacteria and cysts that might be present in uncooked meat. Dogs who eat mostly table scraps or homemade dog foods tend to consume too much fat and not enough nutrition, and therefore have older DogAges.
    Some people foods, however, are OK for dogs in moderation (no more than 10% of the total diet) such as:
    • Vegetables. Most veggies are OK for dogs, either raw or cooked. Stay away from onions and garlic because they can cause anemia in dogs.
    • Rice and pasta. Low in fat and calories, these foods make great treats. Use these to add some bulk for weight control diets.
    • Cooked meats without bones. Small amounts of cooked red meat may be OK when fed occasionally and in moderation. Remember that cooked meats can be high in fat and do not contain the proper balance of nutrients your dog requires.
    • Dairy products. Dairy products, such as cottage cheese, low-fat yogurt, and hard-boiled eggs are OK when fed in moderation.
    • Fruits. Dogs will eat both fresh and dried fruits. Stick with apples, berries, bananas, and seedless watermelon. Don't let your dog eat too much! Too much fruit may upset your dog's digestive system.
    Foods to keep away from your dog are:
    • Sweets. Under any circumstances, DO NOT let your dog eat chocolate. The chemical theobromine contained in chocolate is toxic to canines and even in small amounts can prove to be fatal.
    • Uncooked red meat and bones. Uncooked meats may contain harmful bacteria, parasites, and cysts, which may make your dog sick. Bones may be dangerous because they can splinter and puncture your dog's gastrointestinal tract.
    • Chicken and turkey bones are a potential hazard for your pooch. These small bones can splinter and puncture the stomach or intestines, or cause choking.
    • Grapes and raisins can be toxic to canines if eaten in large amounts.
    • Onions and garlic can cause anemia in dogs.

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    all_about_kimber is offline Senior Member
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    Wow thank you some of the stuff I new but the one really good thing im glad I read was about the raisens my DH has yogort raisens with his oatmeal every morning and he has been sneaking them to her because I don't allow her to have people food. So now because he has read it from someone else he will believe me, they are now over on the couch pouting cause its oatmeal time and they can't have their special lil moment.

    Amy & Kimber

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    Samson is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by all_about_kimber View Post
    Wow thank you some of the stuff I new but the one really good thing im glad I read was about the raisens my DH has yogort raisens with his oatmeal every morning and he has been sneaking them to her because I don't allow her to have people food. So now because he has read it from someone else he will believe me, they are now over on the couch pouting cause its oatmeal time and they can't have their special lil moment.

    Amy & Kimber
    I anticipate some of the RAW feeders will chip in but it's good to hear other points of view. I was particularly taken by the dairy food comments as I know from experience that milk is not good for their digestion in large quantities.

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  6. #4
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    HersheyK's Dad is offline Senior Member
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    I am not a raw feeder, but I have nothing against it. As I read the article, specifically to the raw content, I believe I saw a real bias to applying human nutritional standard to the dogs. To the dogs that we regard as members of our families. But raw meat and bones are, or would be, our dogs natural food if we were not taking care of them. I guess I am not convinced this article has good science behind it.

    For sure the toxic information about many things, chocolate, grapes, etc. is valid but I have to question the warning relative to raw meat.
    Hershey Kisses, In charge of getting Ed out to the dog park so that he gets some exercise.

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    kassabella is offline Senior Member
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    Interesting Colin.
    I was always told if the meat or chicken was frozen first it kills bacteria or cysts. I do agree you have to extra careful not to feed too much fat. I think some dogs can take it others like Ernie can't and at first I thought the raw diet had contributed to his IBD.
    I was encouraged to feed yoghurt and cottage cheese. I knew lactose in milk wasn't good, but hear some dogs are o,.k. Erns used to love a little milk and it didn't him. I now give him rice milk.
    I also wondered about chicken and bacteria and didn't feed it, but was told to feed raw chicken. I am paranoid about the bacteria so washed his face which propably was silly.

    I find it all interesting and think each dog and owner is unique.
    I think we all have stories of dogs like our Kirby living off table scraps and living to the age of 20 and dogs like Kassy on the most expensive kibble I could buy and living to the age of 3 so what is best..???

    Kassa 25/11/01 - 09/02/05 O.S Jaw cancer forever in my heart.
    Ernie 25/11/01 adopted May 05
    Sam 11? adopted Nov 06 - 18/12/07 Lyphoma
    Tessa. Rescued June 2011.
    Bone Cancer Dogs org.http://www.bonecancerdogs.org/
    http://kassabella.tripod.com/kassabella/
    http://collarsbychris.weebly.com/

  8. #6
    pbc
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    Earlier this year dogs who are fed raw diets will no longer be able to become certified as animal assisted therapy dogs unless raw meat is removed from their diet. This policy is in place with Delta and I believe TDI is not far behind.

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    Bob Pr. is offline Senior Member
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    Re: the not feeding raw meat to dogs, I would have not thought raw would be a factor until a recent experience with Puff. (Sorry for the length of this but different parts may be relevant to different dogs & owners; skip down to the blue(& following) if you need a shorter version.)

    As some of you know (see "sticky" at the top of Lab health & Nutrition) Puff is being treated for an infestation of a microscopic "fluke" or trematode (Heterobilarzia americana -- "HA") that she picked up either from swimming and/or the mud in local ponds in Kansas.

    The course of treatment is to give her 10 days of Fenbendazole (FBZ), a poison/chemotherapy designed to kill the H.A. trematodes and their eggs.

    For her first 10 day course, we had the FBZ in a liquid solution. Before each supper, I had to recruit 2 neighbors to help me administer the dose through a needle-less syringe. One person blocked her scooting backwards, I pried her mouth open long enough for a second neighbor to quickly squirt in half the dose; then we repeated the procedure for the remaining half.

    Subsequent testing at KSU's CVM-TH indicated no presence of H.A. eggs. However, they also sent part of the fecal sample on to Texas A&M for more powerful DNA testing. This did show a lingering presence of H.A. so another 10 day treatment was begun again.

    I complained strongly enough about the difficulties of administering the solution via syringe with neighbors' cooperation that KSU-CVM-TH gave us the FBZ in powder form to mix with food.

    I decided to use raw hamburger -- making 2 thin patties of the hamburger for a top and bottom cover with the FBZ powder in the middle.

    While this worked far easier as far as administering the FBZ, after 6 days Puff increasingly became so ill with vomiting and diarrhea that the FBZ had to be discontinued to help her regain health.

    Our vet at KSU-CVM-TH advised me to STOP giving raw hamburger, saying raw hamburger far too often contains bacteria that can upset a dog's stomach. That was a big suprise to me.

    After about 10 days of helping Puff regain health and her appetite, another 10 day course of the FBZ chemotherapy was administered.

    THIS time, per our vet's instruction, I made a hamburger soup by mixing, distributing the threads of hamburger meat into 3/4 cup of water, cooking it, cooling it, and then mixing the dose of FBZ into that soup. That was well received by Puff and she licked her bowl clean -- and completed the 10 day chemotherapy without any gastro-intestinal distress.

    (We're now waiting until Aug 16th to take another fecal sample to KSU to be sent to Texaas A&M to see if the H.A. has been finally killed.)

    Last edited by Bob Pr.; 08-09-2010 at 01:12 AM.
    Puff [YF, AKC field line (from competing HT/FT breeder) 62 lbs, dob: 8-'01]

    Bess [BF, AKC bench line (from competing show breeder) 55 lbs., 1967-1981] "Poor Bess, the Wonder Dog":
    http://forum.justlabradors.com/showt...?p=748#post748

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    kassabella is offline Senior Member
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    Bob is this the same for meat that has been frozen. We have always been told to freeze meat chicken first to kill bacteria.

    I can't feed raw to Ernie as he has a special diet with his Crohns, but I will with the next pup. I think I always cooked their meat anyway as I added a bit of rice and vege to stretch the meat out a bit, but there is the time I might.

    Kassa 25/11/01 - 09/02/05 O.S Jaw cancer forever in my heart.
    Ernie 25/11/01 adopted May 05
    Sam 11? adopted Nov 06 - 18/12/07 Lyphoma
    Tessa. Rescued June 2011.
    Bone Cancer Dogs org.http://www.bonecancerdogs.org/
    http://kassabella.tripod.com/kassabella/
    http://collarsbychris.weebly.com/

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    Bob Pr. is offline Senior Member
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    Bob is this the same for meat that has been frozen. We have always been told to freeze meat chicken first to kill bacteria.
    I've never heard of anyone saying 'freeze meat to kill the bacteria' Possibly it does to some strains of bacteria but I doubt that it does to all or even most. Cooking at a high enough temperature for a long enough time does kill salmonella, etc.. ETA: 165F/74 C


    Last edited by Bob Pr.; 08-09-2010 at 12:49 PM.
    Puff [YF, AKC field line (from competing HT/FT breeder) 62 lbs, dob: 8-'01]

    Bess [BF, AKC bench line (from competing show breeder) 55 lbs., 1967-1981] "Poor Bess, the Wonder Dog":
    http://forum.justlabradors.com/showt...?p=748#post748

  12. #10
    Mary Jane is offline Senior Member
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    I thought the purpose of feeding raw was to replicate (as close as possible) what our dogs would kill if on their own.
    IMO hamburger is not acceptable. What they would kill should have bones, feathers, hide, fur....obstacles to slow down their consumption naturally.
    Also dogs digestive systems are better equipped to deal with those bacterias aren't they? I am offering what I think....I do not KNOW, but I admire those that feed raw.

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