Letting Down Man's Best Friend
Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: Letting Down Man's Best Friend

  1. #1
    HersheyK's Dad's Avatar
    HersheyK's Dad is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Minnetonka, MN
    Posts
    10,307

    DefaultLetting Down Man's Best Friend

    Full article and photos can be found at

    http://www.startribune.com/pet_central/16076867.html

    Letting Down Man's Best Friend

    Clay Myers, Photo courtesy of network.bestfriends.org

    By Kelli Ohrtman, Star Tribune Sales and Marketing

    Last update: February 28, 2008 - 3:26 PM

    Clay Myers, Photo courtesy of network.bestfriends.org

    We sat waiting in rented trucks with the engines chugging, the heat turned up to keep warm. Far above our convoy, at the crest of an autumn-brown hill, barking wafted through the crisp air. It took nearly four hours to load nearly 180 small-breed dogs into our waiting trucks, we animal rescue people tight-lipped so as not to say the wrong thing and ruin the deal.

    Undercover rescue

    It was last October when Best Friends Animal Society worked with animal welfare groups in Virginia to close down a commercial dog breeding facility, aka, a puppy mill. We were able to fix the sellout by securing a third party to buy the dogs first. But what the breeders didn't know was that instead of going to yet another kennel, where the dogs would be continually bred for their valuable puppies, the dogs would be spayed or neutered and placed in permanent, loving homes. Lucky dogs. Most never get out.

    What is a puppy mill?

    Puppy mills, or commercial dog breeding kennels, are not illegal in the United States. In fact, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) licenses more than 6,000 commercial dog breeders and dealers in the country, requiring only periodic inspections to ensure breeders are adhering to the minimum standards. But if breeders want to sell puppies direct to the public via the Internet and classified ads, they can drop their USDA license and keep as many dogs as they like with no requirements, no inspections. While not illegal, the idea that an estimated four million dogs are bred in these facilities each year is absolutely abhorrent to people who care about dogs.

    To most, the idea of keeping a dog in a wire-bottom cage with just six inches of wiggle room is cruel. Especially when you consider that it's legal to keep hundreds of dogs like that for their entire lives - and many people do. That's why mass breeding facilities are opposed by every single animal welfare organization, large and small, in every corner of the country.

    Mabel: 12 years old, blind and pregnant

    Consider what we found in the dogs from this kennel in Virginia. Consider a dog like Mabel. Mabel did not have a name before she was rescued from the Virginia kennel. Instead, she wore a chain around her neck with the breeder's USDA number stamped on it. Mabel is old, probably about twelve. She's totally blind, and had one eye visibly bulging with what must have been excruciating glaucoma, and the other eye shriveled with the same malady. Her teeth were caked in a thick brown layer of tartar; she was riddled with malignant tumors and had infections in both ears. And she was pregnant. Her breeders just didn't care that this ancient, broken-down dog should long ago have had her last litter.

    A spunky young Shih Tzu, dubbed Helen, was also blind. She still had milk from a recent litter that was surely distributed to pet stores, where they were sold for hundreds, if not thousands of dollars. What the people who purchased those unbelievably adorable fluff balls in a pet store couldn't know was that in a few years, long after the store's health guarantee had expired, their dogs could go blind too.

    Commercial breeders free to produce unhealthy dogs

    That's the thing about all the standards imposed by the USDA and some state laws: There is absolutely no requirement that people must breed dogs free of blindness, heart murmurs, deformed kneecaps, severe allergies and the many other maladies we found in this random sample of puppy mill dogs. Though this kennel passed its inspection with flying colors, some of the dogs were severely matted, had life-threatening uterine infections and broken jaws from years of rotten teeth. These are things that with routine care are easy to prevent and inconceivable to ignore. But if your goal is to make money by selling puppies, all that matters is keeping your dogs in good enough shape to make more puppies.
    Hershey Kisses, In charge of getting Ed out to the dog park so that he gets some exercise.

  2. Remove Advertisements
    JustLabradors.com
    Advertisements
     

  3. #2
    rayluckgoo's Avatar
    rayluckgoo is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Lancaster, NH
    Posts
    1,193

    DefaultRe: Letting Down Man's Best Friend

    Not that I wanted to read that but THANK YOU! We always need to keep this in mind and educate our friends who want a purebred puppy.

    again...Thank You

  4. #3
    imported_nellies mom is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    6,512

    DefaultRe: Letting Down Man's Best Friend

    Not a comfortable read. I should send it to my crazy neighbors who have 3 puppy mill dogs.
    <br />~~~~~~~~<br />Danie<br />Nellie, CGC<br />~~~~~~~~<br />The greatness of a nation and its moral progress can be judged by the way its animals are treated. -- Gandhi

  5. Remove Advertisements
    JustLabradors.com
    Advertisements
     

  6. #4
    luke from georgia is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    5,915

    DefaultRe: Letting Down Man's Best Friend

    so sad :'(

    "Properly trained, a man can be dog's best friend." ~ Corey Ford

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25