Pet Adoption approval processes
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Thread: Pet Adoption approval processes

  1. #1
    fburke is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultPet Adoption approval processes

    Adoptions scare me.

    I am looking to add a new Furr member to my family. I have considered either a rescue lab or one from a local shelter.

    Most of these organizations have approval processes. I donít know if I like someone telling me if I should or should not be worthy of one of their animals.

    Every time I read on of the processes it gets me to thinking if I would pass.

    I have had dogs for about 20 years now and I have never had an issue. I admit like most people I know I not text book perfect but I try.

    I donít have a fenced in yard new house big lotÖ :-\

    But I am adding an invisible fence. Willow is never outside without me I always supervise her.

    She is still a little wild but sheís getting there.. I am working with her IĎm just not The Dog Whisperer. 8)

    I do still crate her at 1 Ĺ but if I didnít she would destroy my house and most likely hurt herself in the process.

    My wife and I both work so we stager lunches and come home so she doese get some time outside during the day.

    Now some of the guideline I have read on some sites I would fail.

    Anyone on here gone through this or are maybe one of the people who do the inspections? Are you understanding of peopleís situations?

    Iím not going to "BS" my way through one either I feel thatís wrong. If I donít pass there expetations than what can I say!


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  3. #2
    Sams Mom's Avatar
    Sams Mom is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: Pet Adoption approval processes

    I seem to remember that when we adopted our first dog from the SPCA, they came by the house to check the fenced lot. They didn't with Sam, they just asked for our vet's phone number.


  4. #3
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    DefaultRe: Pet Adoption approval processes

    I found the process of adopting Nellie from Lab Rescue very reassuring. I filled out the application and was contacted to have a home inspection. (I did not need a fenced yard.) Turns out the home inspection was done by the couples lab. It was actually hilarious. He dragged out all my last dogs toys, pooped in my yard, and generally made a watery mess around the water bowl. I was not paying attention to the couple but I'm sure they were documenting my reactions to their pup. LOL. Until I was contacted by the rescue for the home inspection the only contact I could make with them was via e-mail or a phone attached to an answering machine. Turns out this was to protect them since someone a few years ago who was turned down attacked the head of the rescue and beat her up pretty badly.
    They really care for the dogs they rescue and want to make sure these beautiful labbies get good, lasting homes.

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  6. #4
    MyLabsMom is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: Pet Adoption approval processes

    Aw, don't get down about that.

    I did placements and home visits for a local Lab rescue for many years. First, please understand, that scrutinizing people, who want to adopt, is a MUST. 90% of the dogs that were in need of a new home ,were there because the last people who owned them were TERRIBLE dog owners. I'll be honest, we did have expectations for potential adopters, but we NEVER judged an application without first talking to the person on the phone. Like you said, not having a fence might be considered a not-so-great thing for the dog. The last thing we wanted was a dog tied out to a tree for its whole life. However, most times, once I spoke with the person and they explained their situation (lived on a ton of acres, or supervised outside, etc) - then it was a no-brainer. I can tell you that when I visited homes and there were others dogs living there - I could tell the minute I walked in that their pets for loved. Not many were perfectly behaved - I didn't care......mine never behave for visitors, why should I expect someone else's to? I just wanted to see lots of fluffy beds, full clean water and lots of toys lying around.

    I once approved a 72 year old man, who lost his companion dog and because of it, stopped his daily walks. His son said he aged 10 years after that dog died, and no longer was his active ol' self. This guy lived in his son's basement (in-law) apartment = TINY. That didn't change my feelings at all. I placed a beautiful 8 year black boy with him, Jake. To this day, Jake is by this man's side every minute of the day, does every errand with him, and hangs out at the local Men's Hunting Lodge with him. I remember struggling with the fact that this man was quite elderly, and that I didn't want Jake to accidentally hurt him or be too strong for him - or have more energy than he could handle. I'm so very glad I listened to my gut. I knew this dog would be very loved, and love back.

    My point to all this is - don't give up. If a rescue groups criteria is too strict, find another one. Sometimes your information on paper does nothing compared to a conversation or face to face meeting.

    There are lots of rescue people here who might be able to assist in finding one nearby. Where are you located?

    Brenda from Connecticut

  7. #5
    MumtoEllie is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: Pet Adoption approval processes

    I volunteer for our local lab rescue. All good lab rescues will do home visits and they will not turn you down for not having a fenced yard. What they will not do is place certain dogs, that in the opinion of the rescue group, need a fenced yard. I have had two fosters in the past that I would not have adopted out to someone without a fenced yard. The rest of my fosters, however, I was happy to adopt to families without a fenced yard BECAUSE THEY WERE A GOOD FIT!

    PP is correct. Most good lab rescues will bring a dog with them to do your home visit. The purpose of this is to check your reaction to the dog's behavior as well as to check your dog's behaviour with a potential "stranger" in the house.

    They will also check your vet references.

    I would be very encouraged by what you have said in your post. Crating your dog at 1 1/2 years is a good thing! Coming home at lunch time to let your pupper out is even better! No one expects a 1 1/2 year old dog to have perfect behavior.

    A good lab rescue will try and find a good fit with your dog - another reason for the home visit.

    Here are some of the reasons why people are declined for our lab rescue: vet references that do not check out on current pets, not up to date with shots, obvious medical conditions with current pets that go untreated, people who plan to keep the dogs outside in the backyard 24/7, people who ask for intact dogs so they can breed them : ...

    Unless you fit into one of these categories, I think any lab rescue would be grateful that you wanted to give a rescue a home!!!

  8. #6
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    DefaultRe: Pet Adoption approval processes

    HI!! I think you will pass and don't worry. Adoption process could be long and might seem annoying but there is a reason behind it. Everyone who does rescue knows that there are never enough foster homes and funds to save every dog; therefore, most reputable rescues focus on quality rather than quantity. I used to get frustrated that my rescue would not turn over more dogs but then my coleague explained to me, how much could we realistically do (considering that we are all volunteers with day time jobs + families) and that the most important thing is placing dogs into good homes. This could be insured only when we take our time doing home visit, talking to the family, etc.
    Having a fenced in yard does not necessarily mean that this is a good quality home and vice versa. Our rules require fenced in yard for families with children under 10 yrs of age - for safety of the dog and children. Otherwise, it is ok when one does not have a yard at all. I remember once doing a home visit with my coleague.. The family looked perferct on the paper, fenced in yard, house, etc. We didn't allow them to adopt because we both didn't feel comfortable that they could take care of a lab. Mostly when we do home visits we want to get a good feel for the people.
    Good luck and relax!!!

  9. #7
    AngusFangus is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: Pet Adoption approval processes

    I once approved a 72 year old man, who lost his companion dog and because of it, stopped his daily walks. His son said he aged 10 years after that dog died, and no longer was his active ol' self. This guy lived in his son's basement (in-law) apartment = TINY. That didn't change my feelings at all. I placed a beautiful 8 year black boy with him, Jake. To this day, Jake is by this man's side every minute of the day, does every errand with him, and hangs out at the local Men's Hunting Lodge with him. I remember struggling with the fact that this man was quite elderly, and that I didn't want Jake to accidentally hurt him or be too strong for him - or have more energy than he could handle. I'm so very glad I listened to my gut. I knew this dog would be very loved, and love back.
    That is the most beautiful story. :'(

    I have to admit, I've read some rescue applications and felt nervous too. "Would I be good enough?" It's like applying for a job. Sweaty palms!

    I'm sure you will do just fine. I'm glad you're considering rescue!


    Connie and "The Boys":
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    Crash, Pit Bull x Rottweiler x Golden Retriever

  10. #8
    Dani's Avatar
    Dani is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: Pet Adoption approval processes

    You have to understand. We put lots of time, money and love into rehabilitating these animals...and we want to make sure that once they are adopted, they are in the forever homes....not just with a family that likes the thought of a rescue. I've seen all types of people apply for my dogs. And 90% are great adoptors (and even come back to adopt another)...but that other 10% are idiots just like the people who owned the dog before, and won't get a dog from us...I don't bounce an app if there is not a fence as long as there is a good plan in place for proper exercise.

    I bounce apps for having intact dogs in the house (that they are intending on breeding), no experience with the breed/false ideas abnout exercise and training, unrealistic thoughts in general....you can tell alot about a person by the way they talk about other animals in their lives...

    Anyways, no one is telling you that you can't own a dog or care for it...but I do hold a high standard for who get's my dogs...just like there are very few people that I would entrust my own boys to....it's called providing the best care possible for our furry friends.
    Dani, Rider & Rookie
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  11. #9
    Lexis Mom's Avatar
    Lexis Mom is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: Pet Adoption approval processes

    fburke, don't worry about it. I know it is intimidating to have someone, you don't know, come out to meet you, look at your house, ask you questions & generally put you under a microscope. As so many others have said, the purpose of this is to make sure the right dogs get placed in the right "fur"ever homes and that they do not place dogs back into a home similar to what they were rescued from.

    I've been on both sides of this situation, I had to go through a home visit before adopting Lexi and now I do home visits for the resuce I got her from. Having a fence is not a mandatory requirement, as long as you have plans on how to handle the exercise and outside situation. I did not have a fence when I was HV'd or during the first 3 months I had Lexi. One thing I look for when doing an HV is that the prospective adopters have a good knowledge of labs, their energy, needs, etc. I would never have a dog placed where the family has very little or no knowledge of what owning a lab requires.

    My pretty girl, Lexi!

  12. #10
    kaytris is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: Pet Adoption approval processes

    Another option (with some drawbacks) is to go to a less stringent shelter or animal control centre.

    They likely don't do more than rudimentary temperament testing or training, the background and health history of the dog are likely unknown and you may discover problems when you get home, but the adoption process may be more straightforward.

    I adopted Kaylie from the municipal pound after being rejected by a local HS with ridiculously stringent rules and arbitrary decision-making (basically, if the adoption counsellor liked you, you were in). (This isn't just sour grapes, there are many many similar stories about this facility). At the pound, I was asked some basic questions, paid my adoption fee and off we went.

    (** this is not meant to diss the process of rescue groups, I do understand why the policies are in place - I'm just pointing out another choice)

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