How to break a habit I trained not knowing I shouldn't?
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Thread: How to break a habit I trained not knowing I shouldn't?

  1. #1
    Join Date
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    DefaultHow to break a habit I trained not knowing I shouldn't?

    Ok so last night at beginners obedience we are working on stand and stand/stay for exam. Well Sydney know stand and I get her to stand right up no problem and the instructor keeps going down the line helping those that need to learn to the command. Well then she comes back to those of us that already know stand and tell them to stand/stay. Well I did and as soon as the instructor reached for her to touch her she sat. Here is my problem, I taught her to sit for attention so she wouldn't jump on everyone when she wanted to get scratches. Now I need to break this habit and don't know how. She is a good dog and is learning very well but I also want her to learn this but don't know how to go about breaking a habit I actually trained her to do.

    Thanks for any help.

    Jenny

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  3. #2
    Chester B. Dickens is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: How to break a habit I trained no knowing I shouldn't?

    Re-teach the stand, this time w/someone coming in to touch heads, shoulders, backside. If need be, stand right alongside Sidney and stroke her underbelly. "Good stand, Sid. Good girl. What a nice stand..."

  4. #3
    patm's Avatar
    patm is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: How to break a habit I trained not knowing I shouldn't?

    That's what I was going to say. Stay with her and keep her standing physically if you have to, repeating the word stand while someone examines her. I wouldn't start with someone touching her. Have them walk up and then just walk away. You teach her to stand and stay by walking around her, then standing in heel position before you release her - not to a sit, but to play a little , etc. You stand her, walk away, then up to her and examine her yourself - if she sits just say "no - stand" in a matter -of fact voice. This shouldn't be too bad of a habit to break. We all make mistakes when we first start training and have to re-do them. I had trouble with Emilu wanting to move her feet forward and lick the "judge" on the stand for exam - mostly if the person held the palm of their hand up to the dog first (some judges do, some don'ts) She knew the command well, and didn't move while being examined, so I made concious decision to correct her for moving her feet (I have to watch too much "correction" with Emilu or she shuts down) I had someone go up to her, hold out the palm of their hand and if she moved her front feet, they just walked away and I said "no - stand". It only took a few times and she is MUCH better.

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  6. #4
    Join Date
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    DefaultRe: How to break a habit I trained not knowing I shouldn't?

    Thank you both. After having a dog that we seem to have a major issue wiht wiht jumping on certain people and taking her to a different training place and being taught to sit for attention I thought I was doing the right thing.LOL. Well that is until last night, Sydney goes to a training club vs a kennel for training. I will start working on it right away, she sometimes is receptive and eager to please but in the same respect she is 8 months old and trying to show her bullheadedness. We are working on listening regardless of whether she wants to or not, so this should be fun.

    Thank you again.

    Jenny

  7. #5
    Chester B. Dickens is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: How to break a habit I trained not knowing I shouldn't?

    I completely blew off teaching Wesley the stand, finding it one of the dumber exercises I'd ever heard of. We didn't use a groomer, so there was no real use for it there. And I figured the vet would just fend for himself. So I tossed it from our training....

    ....

    ....

    ...until I decided to get into obed competition. And then it took 3x as long to teach.

    Dummy me!

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