Interesting article: "No-kill movement bumps up against reality in U.S."
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    rottnlab dad's Avatar
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    DefaultInteresting article: "No-kill movement bumps up against reality in U.S."

    I just read this article in one of our Seattle newspapers. I thought it was very interesting, but also quite sobering.

    http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/opinio...shelter24.html

    No-kill movement bumps up against reality in U.S.

    By ROWLAND NETHAWAY
    GUEST COLUMNIST

    WACO, Texas -- "No-kill" animal shelters must be right up there with Mom and apple pie.

    After all, who could support the killing of dogs, cats and other small animals that provide loving companionship to people?

    No-kill should be a no-brainer.

    But no-kill animal shelters have critics, especially from some animal lovers.

    People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals has written that no-kill animal shelters should really be called "leave-the-killing-to-someone-else" shelters.

    While admitting that the people who run these shelters mean well, the animal-rights organization charges that no-kill shelters routinely turn away animals that are "diseased, badly injured, aggressive, elderly or unsocialized after spending their lives at the end of a chain -- animals who have little chance of being adopted."

    Besides being selective in their acceptance of adoptable animals, no-kill shelters that promise to keep every animal until it is adopted can result in animals stacked in cages where they remain warehoused in miserable conditions, according to PETA.

    The ideal of never killing any animals brought to shelters runs head-on into the reality of an estimated 8 million stray or abandoned dogs and cats that need homes each year. There is no way that a nationwide no-kill policy could humanely warehouse all the unadopted animals.

    The donations that flow to no-kill shelters often come at the expense of government-supported shelters also run by well-meaning and caring animal lovers.

    When city-run shelters become competitors with no-kill shelters, the traditional shelters not only suffer from a drop in donations, they also become dumping grounds for the least adoptable pets, which often must be euthanized.

    San Antonio's Animal Care Services, according to an Associated Press story, took in 1,004 dogs and cats during a recent week. Only 76 of those animals were adopted or rescued. The rest were killed.

    The city-run shelter reports that it takes in around 50,000 dogs and cats each year and must kill 95 percent of them. Still, the San Antonio shelter has set the goal to become a no-kill shelter by 2012.

    The no-kill movement is growing nationwide. And why not? It is cornering the market in public sympathy and donations. After all, only unfeeling lowlifes would favor killing dogs and cats.

    It is unfair to the compassionate animal lovers who work in traditional shelters to be characterized as polar opposites to no-kill shelters.

    To achieve the commendable no-kill goal nationwide without passing off the heartbreaking animal-control problems to someone else, more efforts should go toward programs that offer free or low-cost spaying and neutering of dogs and cats.

    Cities should adopt ordinances that require sterilization of animals adopted from shelters.

    When donations are given to no-kill shelters an equal amount should be given to traditional shelters that administer spay/neuter programs.

    In most communities, traditional animal shelters, often run by the local humane society with government support, are charged with returning lost animals to their owners or placing them in a good home.

    They also have the responsibility to accept unwanted animals brought to the shelter and to provide them with care while awaiting adoption, when that is possible.

    In addition, traditional shelters often are responsible for educating the public about the pet overpopulation problem and the importance of spaying and neutering pets.

    Aggressive programs that can persuade the public to spay and neuter diminish the need to euthanize animals to control overpopulation.

    There should not be a competition between traditional animal shelters and no-kill shelters. Everyone should be working toward the same goal -- the day when there is no need to kill unwanted animals.

    Rowland Nethaway is senior editor of the Waco Tribune-Herald. E-mail: [email protected].

    Bella

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    DefaultRe: Interesting article: "No-kill movement bumps up against reality in U.S."

    And does anyone really care what PETA says.

    Sorry, but I can't stand that organization and couldn't read the article once they started quoting PETA.

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    theoconbrio is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: Interesting article: "No-kill movement bumps up against reality in U.S."

    Quote Originally Posted by raian
    And does anyone really care what PETA says.

    Sorry, but I can't stand that organization and couldn't read the article once they started quoting PETA.
    Even a broken clock is right twice a day. The article makes some good points, especially this one:

    It is unfair to the compassionate animal lovers who work in traditional shelters to be characterized as polar opposites to no-kill shelters.

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    DefaultRe: Interesting article: "No-kill movement bumps up against reality in U.S."

    Quote Originally Posted by theoconbrio
    Quote Originally Posted by raian
    And does anyone really care what PETA says.

    Sorry, but I can't stand that organization and couldn't read the article once they started quoting PETA.
    Even a broken clock is right twice a day. The article makes some good points, especially this one:

    It is unfair to the compassionate animal lovers who work in traditional shelters to be characterized as polar opposites to no-kill shelters.
    I agree - there are a few no kill shelters in the area and the reality is that they are so consistently full that it is very tough to get them to take an animal. An owner looking to give up their pet has to be pretty resourceful (locating rescue groups or finding a home on their own) to keep their pet out of a kill shelter. Most will not put in that amount of energy.

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    AngusFangus is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: Interesting article: "No-kill movement bumps up against reality in U.S."

    That's true. I've called about placing strays I've found in our low-kill (not even no-kill) shelter, and it seemed like I was going to need an Act of Congress to get them in. :-\ Thankfully I found their owners at last.

    more efforts should go toward programs that offer free or low-cost spaying and neutering of dogs and cats.
    This is really key. Slowly, slowly, it's headed in that direction...but it is really going to take a long time. I wish our spay/neuter program did some television or newspaper ads, or something to get the message out to the general public. We have a program for low-income families to have their pets spayed for free, and participating vets offer low-cost spays/neuters to everyone else. But...no one knows it's available. :-\


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    DefaultRe: Interesting article: "No-kill movement bumps up against reality in U.S."

    We live in a very rural area. I am on the board of the ONLY "spay/neuter" org in this area. I don't know if other communities have such orgs. This org was started by a single woman that just wants to make a difference. We do various fund raisers during the year to raise funds to help with spay/neuter costs to everyone, including our only low kill shelter. I also have been a volunteer at that shelter..... (that's another story in itself). Spay/neutering is the answer, and I agree with Connie, it is slowly starting to sink in to peoples brains. Our state just last year started a state funded spay/neuter program , it is going toward the low income participants, but it was a small amt. of money and they ran out half way through the year. That tells me, that people will do it, if they get help with the costs which have skyrocketed here..... Our shelter here does have a low cost cat clinic every couple of months too. Our area is really trying to get a handle on all the dogs and cats..... I think that states should stand up and take notice..... the state funded spay/neuter would really help out, IMO......

    I love the "idea" of NO kill shelters.... it just doesn't work that way in reality..... that is why we need to keep pushing spay/neuter..... spay/neuter..... it is the only way to try to cut down on so many unwanted pets..... just MO....

    Melissa
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    DefaultRe: Interesting article: "No-kill movement bumps up against reality in U.S."

    I think the no-kill shelters are a good idea but not well thought out. It is not something you can just pop up and like the article said, it would make the traditional shelters look like killers. And that ios certainly not the case. I agree with Connie and Melissa. It will take education and time. Ideally, there would be no need for shelters. And it does show that people will use the benefits when they are available and know about it.

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    DefaultRe: Interesting article: "No-kill movement bumps up against reality in U.S."

    The statistics are heartbreaking and sobering. And yes, low cost spay and neuter programs are key. However, education of the general public is lacking.. too many people believe that spaying or neutering are for others--not their dog.

    The thing that I have the biggest problem with is the government mandated spay or neuter laws. That wave is slowly creeping across the country, fueled no doubt by organizations like PETA and HSUS, and unfortunately by regular pet loving, compassionate people who are won over by the rhetoric of the HSUS and PETA. If they get their way, there will be no animal shelters, no-kill or otherwise. There will be no pets to place in the shelters. I have read many places of quotes allegedly from HSUS executives, "one generation, and out." I don't want to see the extinction of all domestic pets. I don't think anyone here does either.

    The solution for this problem isn't so simple. How do we protect the dedicated, quality breeders like Labby, Sharon, Anne, and others like them while closing down the puppymills and the bybs? How do we ensure that the majority of pets are spayed and neutered without penalizing these same quality breeders? I think this issue is about as complicated as the solution to healthcare.
    “If I know every single phone call you’ve made, I’m able to determine every single person you’ve talked to; I can get a pattern about your life that is very, very intrusive. And the real question here, is what do they do with this information that they collect – that does not have anything to do with al-Qaeda? And we’re gonna trust the president and the vice president that they’re doing the right thing? Don’t count me in on that.”
    Joe Biden, 2006

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    DefaultRe: Interesting article: "No-kill movement bumps up against reality in U.S."

    Quote Originally Posted by 4yelloweyedogs
    that is why we need to keep pushing spay/neuter..... spay/neuter..... it is the only way to try to cut down on so many unwanted pets..... just MO....
    I have no problems with spay/neuter clinics to help out folks that might not be able to afford it. I do have a problem with legislation REQUIRING spay/neutering. I'm not saying this is what you are recommending, but I wanted to put that out there.

    The laws that are popping up requiring that everyone must s/n their dogs or pay a fee is only going to harm the breeds that we love. Only those who "make their living" off of dog breeding will be able to afford the fees. The rest of us, those of us that are considered reputable, will be gone.

    This is where these legislations get dangerous.



    Laura





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    DefaultRe: Interesting article: "No-kill movement bumps up against reality in U.S."

    Quote Originally Posted by labby
    Quote Originally Posted by 4yelloweyedogs
    that is why we need to keep pushing spay/neuter..... spay/neuter..... it is the only way to try to cut down on so many unwanted pets..... just MO....
    I have no problems with spay/neuter clinics to help out folks that might not be able to afford it. I do have a problem with legislation REQUIRING spay/neutering. I'm not saying this is what you are recommending, but I wanted to put that out there.

    The laws that are popping up requiring that everyone must s/n their dogs or pay a fee is only going to harm the breeds that we love. Only those who "make their living" off of dog breeding will be able to afford the fees. The rest of us, those of us that are considered reputable, will be gone.

    This is where these legislations get dangerous.
    Yes! That is exactly what I was trying to say.
    I think so many people get caught up in the urgency of solving the problem, they don't realize that they are creating a whole new problem.
    “If I know every single phone call you’ve made, I’m able to determine every single person you’ve talked to; I can get a pattern about your life that is very, very intrusive. And the real question here, is what do they do with this information that they collect – that does not have anything to do with al-Qaeda? And we’re gonna trust the president and the vice president that they’re doing the right thing? Don’t count me in on that.”
    Joe Biden, 2006

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