Question on Canine Cancers
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Thread: Question on Canine Cancers

  1. #1
    HersheyK's Dad's Avatar
    HersheyK's Dad is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultQuestion on Canine Cancers

    Maybe it is just that this group shares so much, which is great.

    It seems to me that there are an awful lot of cancers being discussed on the forum. Is this something that is inceasing in frequency, or just that I have not participated in any discussion group like this before we go Hershey Kisses. Are there dietary influences? Are there any preventive actions that we as caretakers of these animals can take? These stories are so hard to deal with. I feel so helpless to comfort the animals. As caretakers that have taken these animals into our families it is hard on us also, but the sufferring of the poor innocent dogs is much more difficult for me. I have come to view Hershey Kisses as probably the last dog I will ever care for if I can provide her a good long healthy life. If she makes it to 15 years, I will be 77 and not likely physically or mentally able to deal with a puppy. Not sure that I will have the ability to work with a rescue either, which will be my path if something happens to HK. I am looking to do whatever I can to guarantee her a healthy and long life. So, how about some discussion on what we can do in the preventive arena.
    Hershey Kisses, In charge of getting Ed out to the dog park so that he gets some exercise.

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  3. #2
    AngusFangus is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: Question on Canine Cancers

    I am reading EXTENSIVELY on this subject right now. :-\

    I'm afraid I don't have any concrete answers. However, the following is the impression that I'm getting from my reading:

    Canine cancer seems to be more prevalent now than ever. Now, is that because people are taking their dogs to vets more often, and cancers are being discovered that would have previously gone undetected? Is it just because we live more closely together now, so we notice more things? Or is it because of something else?

    I'm not sure anyone can answer this definitively... :-[

    I know my mom likes to tell the story of the farm dogs from when she was a girl. These dogs never came inside, never had a bite of commercial food, ran around the farm all day and ate whatever scraps were left over from dinner. They lived well into their teens, reportedly.

    I can tell you what I am trying: I want to feed the best food possible, and limit the toxins/carcinogens/chemicals that enter Angus' system (in the form of vaccinations, flea medications, cleaning products, etc.)

    I have a strong suspicion about vaccinations. Angus got his puppy series and a booster, but at two years I started titering. This will be his second year to get titers. I am trying like hell to figure out how I'm going to weasel our way out of the Rabies vac. He received a three-year vaccine last year, but our county demands annual vaccinations. That is just wrong IMO.

    Now that he has had a cancer diagnosis, he's coming off carbs. This is going to be HARD. All dog biscuits are heavy on grains, and most commercial dog foods are as well.

    Many people believe that a raw or homemade diet is some of the best preventive medicine. I am looking into that, but honestly I'm finding it a bit overwhelming and cost-prohibitive for such a large dog. It would be much easier if I had a Chihuahua. But I don't like Chihuahuas.

    I will be interested to see what others have to say.


    Connie and "The Boys":
    Angus, Yellow Lab, CGC, RE, CD
    Simon, d.b.a. Flat Coated Retriever, CGC, RE, CD

    Gone ahead, but forever in my heart:
    Crash, Pit Bull x Rottweiler x Golden Retriever

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    labby's Avatar
    labby is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: Question on Canine Cancers

    I blame a lot of things but usually start with all the chemicals we use these days. There are chemicals for fleas and ticks, chemicals for heartworm, chemicals for pain, etc. etc. LEt's not forget all the fertilizers for the lawn, all the cars which are polluting. We have more cancer, just not our dogs.





    Laura





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    HersheyK's Dad's Avatar
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    DefaultRe: Question on Canine Cancers

    Right! Feedback from two of the people that I value greatly on this board. Exposure to chemical and chemical in the food are concerning me. Never thought I would consider feeding raw. Guess what? It is being considered.

    I guess I will be cutting out the Lyme Disease Vac. HK already had a couple ticks before we started the Frontline. Not deer ticks, Lyme Disease source, but we have deer through the property every day. I can let the flea preventative go, at least until a problem surfaces. We can/do use the 3 yr Rabbies vaccines. We haven't seen a case of rabbies here in so long, I wonder if it is necessary other than by law. What else can we avoid?

    In reading AngusFangus' response, a memory cell got triggered. The mutt I grew up with lived to 16 years old. Never, I mean never, went to the vet for anything other than required rabies shots. Ate canned or dry dog food, what ever was on sale that my parents could afford. Never any kind of transition between different feed. And I was the primary provider of table scraps. No leftovers ever went into the trash, they always went into Barkie. He was a pup until two days before I had to let the vet help him rest. I took him to three vets on his last night hoping to get a different answer from the next one. But they all said the same thing. He had cancer and it had involved several organs that were failing. How they knew is beyond me. There was no biopsies, there were no lumps. I knew every inch of that dog. I do not know if it was cancer, but I am sure it was his time to go. But he was 16 years old. These stories we are reading are about much younger dogs.
    Hershey Kisses, In charge of getting Ed out to the dog park so that he gets some exercise.

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    kassabella is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: Question on Canine Cancers

    Before Kass was dx with cancer I had no idea dogs could get it. I still belong to the cancer group and each of us why, how, could we have prevented it, the guilt if we had taken our dog to vet earlier etc.

    Yes I still beat myself up. But have learned cancer is a silent beast with no rules and no right or wrong ways to deal with it. Unfortunately we can't prevent it.

    There are no definite answers. There are lots of theories. Environmental, (food, chemicals etc) hereditary,
    and injury.Kassa was 2. So could food or chemicals have worked this quickly. Heredity (cancers can take up to 2 years to delevope) or injury. She had a tooth that hadn't come down and vets believe may have become infected, healed and bad cells started to take over good cells. It was at this site the cancer started.

    Studies in the last 2 years have proved injury to be a more than a probable theory in animal and human cancer.

    There are also studies being in the U.S. that dogs spayed too early could have an influence on the bone developement.

    We have discusions in here about raw/kibble and will it protect our beloved dogs. There will never be a right answer. We do our best with the information we have. We can wrap our dogs in cotton wool ,feed organic, not let them play on the lawn, or go outside but this isn't a quarantee they will be safe.

    O.K. will get off my soap box now. Sorry to ramble.
    Think I have been spending too much time analysising why Kassy and now Sammy have been dealt the rotten hand.



    Kassa 25/11/01 - 09/02/05 O.S Jaw cancer forever in my heart.
    Ernie 25/11/01 adopted May 05
    Sam 11? adopted Nov 06 - 18/12/07 Lyphoma
    Tessa. Rescued June 2011.
    Bone Cancer Dogs org.http://www.bonecancerdogs.org/
    http://kassabella.tripod.com/kassabella/
    http://collarsbychris.weebly.com/

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    AngusFangus is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: Question on Canine Cancers

    Well, this was weird!

    I have been reading a little each morning on "The Natural Vet's Guide to Preventing and Treating Cancer in Dogs" by Shawn Messonnier, DVM. This morning I came across a section that answered your question perfectly. So, here it is:

    It is important to understand that there are no guarantees and no way to totally prevent cancer. Even if you follow these recommendations, there is always a chance your pet may still get cancer. What I can say with certainty is that this protocol will minimize the chances of your pet getting cancer and other degenerative disorders.

    PROVIDE A PROPER DIET: Minimize animal and plant by-products and chemical preservatives in your pet's diet. When possible, a homemade diet using quality ingredients is best; a holistic, organic processed food would be a second option.

    MINIMIZE VACCINATIONS: While they are not always completely reliable, antibody titer tests, which are simple blood tests that give information about an individual pet's antibody status in relation to specific diseases, can help your doctor to immunize your pet only when necessary. When possible, pets should be vaccinated only for those diseases for which they are most at risk, rather than receive every vaccine available. And pets with cancer should not receive any extra vaccines if at all possible! (See the section on vaccinosis on page 267 for an in-depth discussion of a holistic approach to vaccinations and the possible relationship between vaccinations and cancer).

    MINIMIZE EXPOSURE TO TOXIC CHEMICALS: When possible, use natural products to prevent or treat diseases. For example, choose natural flea products over chemical insecticides; if chemical insecticides are required, they should be used only when needed rather than year round. Similarly, if natural products such as glucosamine or hyaluronic acid can be used for pets with arthritis, they are preferred to the extensive use of conventional medications such as NSAIDs.

    PREVENT OTHER DISEASES: Take preventative measures. For example, give your dog monthly oral heartworm medication. This will prevent the dog from becoming infected and requiring harsher chemicals for treatment. (Unfortunately, we do not currently have any proven natural methods for preventing heartworm infection and disease.) Also, early spaying and neutering can, for many pets, eliminate the chances of developing most cancers of the reproductive organs, and if you own a light-haired pet, limiting sun exposure can decrease the chances of some types of skin cancer.

    VISIT YOUR VETERINARIAN REGULARLY: Regular examinations that include laboratory testing of blood and urine are the best way to ensure early diagnosis of cancer if it occurs. If you suspect cancer, ask your veterinarian for other diagnostic tests, such as x-rays and EKGs. Every lump and bump needs to be aspirated by your veterinarian to rule out cancer; otherwise, that lump could grow and spread, and kill your pet! I recommend annual examinations for pets under five years of age, and semi-annual examinations for pets five years of age and older.

    PRACTICE A HEALTHY LIFESTYLE: Don't expose your pets to tobacco smoke or other toxins.

    USE NUTRITIONAL SUPPLEMENTS: As your pet ages, oxidative stresses increase and degenerative changes occur. Many supplements can mitigate these changes, including supplements of fatty acids (I like a product called Ultra EFA, by Rx Vitamins for Pets), health maintenance formulas (Vim & Vitor, by Pet Togethers; www.pettogethers.net/healthypet), and antioxidant supplements (such as Proanthozone, by Animal Health Options).


    Connie and "The Boys":
    Angus, Yellow Lab, CGC, RE, CD
    Simon, d.b.a. Flat Coated Retriever, CGC, RE, CD

    Gone ahead, but forever in my heart:
    Crash, Pit Bull x Rottweiler x Golden Retriever

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    HersheyK's Dad's Avatar
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    DefaultRe: Question on Canine Cancers

    Oh! Kassabella

    So sorry that you have dealt with two. Your story ahs certainly heightened what i am going to be watching for. HK has three teeth that should have shown up by now but are not to be found. I guess she is going to have to put up with my probing her mouth on a daily basis rather than a weekly basis now. She loves it soooo much.<not>
    Hershey Kisses, In charge of getting Ed out to the dog park so that he gets some exercise.

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    HersheyK's Dad's Avatar
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    DefaultRe: Question on Canine Cancers

    This thread just go saved into favorites.
    Hershey Kisses, In charge of getting Ed out to the dog park so that he gets some exercise.

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    DefaultRe: Question on Canine Cancers

    Great article, AngusFangus! I am constantly worrying about what to feed them, reading labels & trying to decide which supplements are best to give them. Our county only requires rabies every 3 yrs., so we are lucky. You mentioned titre. I asked my "new" vet about doing that and he said he could, but it is his practice to just give the immunizations every year. He also refused to give me FrontlinePlus & Interceptor b/c he prefers Advantage Multi as I said in a thread yesterday.

    I've found a holistic vet that I am going to check into. I can't believe vets have so many varying opinions on things. I would think they are all taught basically the same thing.

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    TangerineFizz is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: Question on Canine Cancers

    When Jordan was diagnosed with lymphoma, I did a lot of reading too. I've come to the same conclusions as above - all the extra chemicals/poisons out there in the world, over vaccinating, and for me, I really think corn is a big contributor to it all too, due to the chemicals that the corn gets blasted with.

    This time round, nobody in my house is getting any food with corn in it. Will it help? I don't know, but it gives me peace of mind.
    Me, Abzilla and the Helomonster.

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