Entropion Eye in Labradors
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Thread: Entropion Eye in Labradors

  1. #1
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    DefaultEntropion Eye in Labradors

    Just curious if anyone has come upon this condition in their Lab. We are thinking of adding a 3yr old yellow lab to our family, and her one main problem is one entropion eye (sp). Has this created many problems for your pet?. Any info would be appreciated. I don't want to get my hopes up about adopting her before I know what we are getting into. Thanks!

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  3. #2
    AngusFangus is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: Entropion Eye in Labradors

    I don't have any direct experience, but maybe someone else has.

    I do remember seeing a dog at an adoption day that had it. Frank was his name. I think he was a Golden mix. Very sweet boy.

    Anyway, I got curious about it when I saw him and went home and looked it up. From what I can remember, it can be corrected surgically without a lot of trouble. I think I'm remembering that right?

    If you like her personality I think it would be great if you adopted her. Dogs that have little problems like this are often passed over because no one wants to deal with them. So, if you had the means to have it corrected, wouldn't it be wonderful to give her a chance at a great life!

    You should maybe call a vet and get some advice on how difficult a surgery it is...


    Connie and "The Boys":
    Angus, Yellow Lab, CGC, RE, CD
    Simon, d.b.a. Flat Coated Retriever, CGC, RE, CD

    Gone ahead, but forever in my heart:
    Crash, Pit Bull x Rottweiler x Golden Retriever

  4. #3
    Cinder4evr is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: Entropion Eye in Labradors

    Does this help?

    Entropion
    Entropion is the medical term which indicates that the eyelids roll inward toward the surface of the eye. This "in-rolling" of one or more eyelids may cause ocular irritation. Entropion can result in corneal ulcers or scarring of the surface of the cornea due to chronic irritation from the hairs of the skin touching the cornea during blinking.

    Entropion is most commonly classified as either spastic or congenital.4 Spastic entropion is caused by ocular irritation that initiates continued spastic contraction of the orbicular muscle resulting in inversion of the lid margin.4 A cycle of irritation and spasm results. If the condition is treated early by correcting the initial problem, surgical correction may be unnecessary. Examples of causes of spastic entropion are distichia, (see below), and trauma to the face. Chronic inflammation such as untreated conjunctivitis can also cause entropion.

    The congenital form can develop in pups to young adults. Usually the lower lid is affected. One or both eyes may be involved. Some pups with entropion will eventually grow out of the disease as the head enlarges during the first several months of life. For this reason, primary surgical correction which involves removal of extra skin from the affected lid, is usually not performed until dogs are six months of age or older.1 If the condition is mild prior to six months, ophthalmic ointment can be used. This softens the hairs and thickens the tear film on the surface of the cornea to reduce the abrasion of the cornea by hairs. Temporary tacking sutures can also be placed in the eyelids of puppies to roll the lids out away from the surface of the eye until it can be determined if surgical correction is indicated.

    Congenital entropion occurs in dogs that are conformationally predisposed.4 Inherited entropion may appear anytime prior to maturity, whereas mild entropion may improve spontaneously with growth of the pup. The inheritance of entropion is not clear. It is likely that it is influenced by several genes (polygenetic) defining skin and other structures which make up the eyelids, the amount and weight of the skin and other structures which make up the eyelid, the amount and weight of the skin covering the head and face, the orbital contents, and the conformation of the skull.5

    Because the inheritance is not defined, and entropion does not result in a vision threatening condition, dogs with entropion are not disqualified from obtaining a CERF number. However, entropion must be recognized early in the course of the disease to prevent corneal damage. It is easily correctable by simple surgical procedures if indicated.



    And this board has a couple of articles on it.

    http://www.labradorforums.co.uk/

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  6. #4
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    DefaultRe: Entropion Eye in Labradors

    Thanks for the information, that is kind of what I thought, now I need to see some pictures of the girl ( her name is Bailey) and decide if the cost of surgery plus her getting spayed is an expense I can afford as well as what the breeder is asking for her. He seems to be trying to do the right thing by not breeding her and wanting her to have a good home but he is asking quite a bit. On an off note, Cinder4ever, I noticed you have a picture of Angel as your siggy. I had the great surprise of my life last Sat when a guy came up to me at a party and just started talking to me. I looked up to see who it was and it turned out to be Riley from Buffy. I was temporarily speechless, and called him Riley instead of Marc and then made a fool of myself telling him how much I enjoyed his character on the show. Funny where you meet people.
    Thanks again.........

  7. #5
    Cinder4evr is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: Entropion Eye in Labradors

    Total hijack, but I'm SO jealous! I always liked Riley and how Marc Blucas played him. Thought he was greatly misunderstood in the Buffyverse.

    Did you know season 8 of buffy is out in coomic book form? dark horse comics is the publisher.

  8. #6
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    DefaultRe: Entropion Eye in Labradors

    Thanks for the FYI, I'm a closet Buffy fan, even my husband and friends had no idea who he was......so cute and nice in person......wish you could have been there too! LOL

  9. #7
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    DefaultRe: Entropion Eye in Labradors

    Riley had pretty severe entropion when I got him. I was too ignorant to recognize it as that, but I got worried after a few days when his eyes didn't stop watering and seemed to be bothering him. I ended up asking the vet when I took him in for his first check, and he had to check for corneal damage (which thankfully he didn't have yet) and he gave us some eye drops to try to help with the inflammation. The eye drops did basically nothing, and we scheduled the surgical correction along with his neuter. After that first surgery, he had a lot of swelling, and it ended up that the vet had overcorrected and caused ectropion in both eyelids. After ANOTHER surgery, his eyes look fairly normal and have not bothered him since the final surgery. I don't remember if I have posted many close-ups of his face, but you can occasionally see that his eyelids are a little more droopy than some labs. It is virtually impossible to see this when he is alert or active, however. It's mostly when he's tired or lazy or right after he wakes up. Feel free to ask me any questions you can think of about the surgery, etc. The one word of caution I do have for you is that according to my vet, if entropion is left uncorrected for too long, the eyelashes will scratch the cornea and create damage. This can lead to eye problems and blindness.

  10. #8
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    DefaultRe: Entropion Eye in Labradors

    ks02: Thats one of the questions I have for the owner of Bailey now, basically I would want to know why he has not had the problem corrected before now. Even if he was waiting to see if it corrected as she grew, by the age of 3 she is not going to change much and has their current vet suggested what they do? I am worried about damage that can't be reversed, not only for our sake but also for Bailey. the current owner ( he was on his cell and he is calling later this afternoon so we can discuss it further) seems to be somewhat knowlegable in the breeding of labs ( he is trying to develop a kennel and only wants to keep the ones who show promise) and since she would be a family pet only, the looks of her eyes are not what bothers me, its her comfort. I'm glad you got Riley help early, I just keep worrying its too late for this girl. I know if I see her in person, I'm sunk, so I am going to ask him to e-mail me pictures so I can see her that way first. By the way, I'm not sure what part of the country your from, but what was price range of the surgery and what was the post surgical period like?
    Thanks in advance,
    Jan

  11. #9
    dogmom is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: Entropion Eye in Labradors

    I think it is absolutely horrible that this poor girl has suffered for the last 3 years. What kind of person would knowingly NOT perform surgery, it would be one thing if he was just ignorant and didn't realize why the dog had red, oozing eyes. But to actually know and not help her is horrible.

    This can be easily corrected and in most cases is not terribly expensive. Hopefully, she will get help soon.

  12. #10
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    DefaultRe: Entropion Eye in Labradors

    If her eyes are constanting red, watering and oozing; she definitely needs the surgery. Not terribly expensive; maybe a $200-$300 (from my experience with dogs in the rescue group). I have a rescue that is about 4 years old; was about 2 when I adopted her. My vet said she has a very minor case of entropian and suggested we wait and just watch hers to see if it progressed; which THANK GOD, it has not. Her eyes NEVER water, she never paws at them, they are never red, she shows no discomfort at all (vet said all these things would be present if the surgery was needed).
    I wonder why the "breeder" does not pay to have her spayed and the entropian surgery done before placing her in a home? If I read this right; they are also charging you a "fee" for her; I don't understand you paying both......I guess I see this as you would be "rescuing" her from a bad situation. If her temperament is good, I say go for it and give this furbaby a wonderful new home!

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