When to spay?
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Thread: When to spay?

  1. #1
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    DefaultWhen to spay?

    What is the appropriate age to spay a female lab. Our Karlee is 6 months old and is a lean and mean 60lbs. We have no intentions on breeding her.Our teacher at puppy class said if you don't wait at least one year that it will stunt the dogs growth.Any truth to this

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  3. #2
    HersheyK's Dad's Avatar
    HersheyK's Dad is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: When to spay?

    Check Labby's website. She has an article there. Talk to your vet, get that opinion. Beat yourself over the head with a baseball bat, and make a decision. There are two opposed points of view. Legitimate arguments on both sides.

    I will summarize what I believe I got out of the process when I went though it.

    Spay before first heat reduces probability of breast cancer to almost 0, and it is the most common form but increases the probability of many other cancers although the occurrence of them without spaying is much lower than breast cancer. there is also the potential to increase the occurrence of UTIs, some immune diseases, and other issue.

    Waiting until post first heat also reduces the occurrence of breast cancer but not nearly as much. Increase of the other cancers and issues is not as great.

    The above is my interpretation of what I read and researched. You should do your own investigation. Again, Labby's website is an excellent source for all kinds of information. It is also not in agreement with the decision that we made.

    We lost a Golden Retriever to breast cancer, so that became our primary decision maker. That was our experience. It is a personal decision. There is no right answer for everyone.

    Hershey Kisses, In charge of getting Ed out to the dog park so that he gets some exercise.

  4. #3
    Baloo317's Avatar
    Baloo317 is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: When to spay?

    Here's a really good thread about this:
    https://www.justlabradors.com/forum/i...c,21285.0.html

    This is the link provided on Laura's website:
    http://www.veterinarypartner.com/Con...C=23&A=584&S=1
    Kate
    Baloo - 5 year old black lab
    Peanut - 7 year old minpin
    Monster - 3-ish year old frenchie/jack, rescue
    We're Superdogs!


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  6. #4
    Skubaa Guest

    DefaultRe: When to spay?

    Whatever you decide, please consider doing a blood clotting test prior to any surgery. As I and a couple other JL'ers have learned the hard way, it is an inexpensive test that could become priceless in the end. I was one of the lucky ones, Phoebe was pulled through this major complication only by the grace of god. But, other owners have not been as lucky.

    DG

  7. #5
    Snowco Labradors's Avatar
    Snowco Labradors is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: When to spay?

    I recommend one year for females and one year to 18 months for males so the dog will develope to the proper standard of the breed - growth plates, etc. (in my contract)

    I also agree with last poster on blood clotting. A full blood panel prior to surgery on any dog, any age, is always a wise thing to do.

    Be sure and check with your breeder if you have a contract as spay/neuter age may be listed in that contract.

  8. #6
    HersheyK's Dad's Avatar
    HersheyK's Dad is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: When to spay?

    I find recommending a full blood panel before spaying surgery odd. I visited three vets before spaying Hershey Kisses. Not doing the full panel was not an option. They basically told me if I had an objection to find another vet, because they wouldn't operate without it. This was just one a several questions I asked in my interview process to assess the vets.
    Hershey Kisses, In charge of getting Ed out to the dog park so that he gets some exercise.

  9. #7
    Snowco Labradors's Avatar
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    DefaultRe: When to spay?

    There is nothing odd about it. I would prefer to know that my dog is in good health before being put under anesthesia and developing a life threatening problem on the table because there may be problems no one was aware of for lack of a full blood work up.


  10. #8
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    DefaultRe: When to spay?

    Quote Originally Posted by Snowco Labradors
    There is nothing odd about it. I would prefer to know that my dog is in good health before being put under anesthesia and developing a life threatening problem on the table because there may be problems no one was aware of for lack of a full blood work up.

    I think what Ed meant was that the bloodwork was considered part of the procedure, and he found it odd that some vets have the option of NOT having it done.....? But I could be wrong. :-[
    Kate
    Baloo - 5 year old black lab
    Peanut - 7 year old minpin
    Monster - 3-ish year old frenchie/jack, rescue
    We're Superdogs!


  11. #9
    Skubaa Guest

    DefaultRe: When to spay?

    I think her response that something was "odd" was why wouldn't a blood panel work up be done before all surgeries. Her vet wouldn't consider doing a surgery without one.

    I wish it was done as a routine, but I don't think it is. I know some breeds like dobermans I think are prone to the blood clotting issue and do get tested regularly. But, since labs aren't a breed with that known problem, they often aren't tested. Is it included in a blood panel work up---don't know. Liver, Kidney, etc probably are included. I don't know about all the different possible tests that are prudent to conduct on a healthy, young dog before an elective surgery either. Maybe someone on JL who is a vet can go into that aspect.

    All I do know is that this blood clotting issue seems to be creeping into the picture more and more. It is a blow-your-mind kind of complication that is completely avoidable. It can take a dog that has come through surgery and is looking fine to death's door before anyone can figure out what the heck is going on. Then, when it is figured out, do the vets have access to the blood clotting fluids that are essential to even have half a shot at saving the dog's life? I will bring up this test as often as possible to get the word out. Sorry if you get tired of me saying it. But, if I can save one dog and keep one owner from the guilt of the horrible outcome, it will be worth it.

    When to spay is a personal decision. We did Phoebe at 9 months. I did my previous female dog at well over 3 years because that is when I got her from the pound. I was given both advice---wait for a year to let her fully develop but then my vet said there is no evidence it stunts growth. My deciding factor---I have 3 kids ranging from age 6 - 13 and I didn't want to add a dog in heat to that mix especially since I had never even been around a dog in heat. It was as simple as that for me.

    DG

  12. #10
    Canyon Labradors's Avatar
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    DefaultRe: When to spay?

    I always giggle at the reason to wait being it will "stunt their growth". Altering early actually causes the growth plates in the bones to close a bit later, causing a slightly taller dog. However, what DOES happen is that the dog does not going through the normal maturation process and in the case of a male dog, you will not get an adult that is bulked up with muscles the way a true adult male lab would look like. It's similar with females, however, it's not as noticeable because females do tend to retain a femine/puppy-like quality even as adults. Maybe that's the growth stunting they were referring to.

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