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Thread: new to labs

  1. #1
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    Defaultnew to labs

    Hi I'm Erin we are aquiring a yellow lab from my ex-husband and his wife who can no longer keep her and my daughter would be heart broke if she had to leave the family. I am posting this here and in introduction hoping to get some help. I will say I don't know squat about labs. I have raised Airedales my whole life so this is new to me. But don't worry I know what I am getting into and am fully prepared to take on a lab. This dog has no manners and spends most of her day in a cage at there house. How should I get her use to being in the house and not caged? Should I tether her to me for a while or should I just let her in the fence when we get her home to get some well needed exercise first. Any and all advice will be greatly appreciated. Just so everyone knows she will be greatly loved and disiplined here, we have an acre fenced for or 2 airedales and several places she will be able to swim on a regular basis. Again ty in advance for your help.

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  3. #2
    Canyon Labradors's Avatar
    Canyon Labradors is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: new to labs

    My boss has airedales, and I have dog sat them many times. I think if you can handle and train them, you should do OK with labs. Training is going to be key.

    I would try to keep alot of the same routine and expand the freedom as appropriate. I wouldn't try to leave the dog out of the crate when you aren't around, but if you are home, there is no reason the dog shouldn't be with you. You may want to consider using baby gates to block off the dog from the rest of the house, close the doors to rooms you don't want her in.

    Think of her as a puppy, and work in that direction.

    Have fun with your new dog. It's nice that you offered to take her on!

  4. #3
    Labs4life is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: new to labs

    I'm not familiar with airedales but young labs are chewers. CYNLABS advice is on the money. It sounds to me you'll be fine with a lab.
    The Constitution is suppose to guarantee everyone the right to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness, but the Constitution does not guarantee everyone equal outcomes.
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  6. #4
    jzgrlduff's Avatar
    jzgrlduff is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: new to labs

    Good for you for taking her!! Welcome to our forum, by the way.

    How old is the dog? How old is your daughter?



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    "Each is a creature of Earth and is entitled to reside on it with dignity"

  7. #5
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    DefaultRe: new to labs

    Welcome to the forum you've come to the right place. First you might want to check out "our best advice" thread in the Training section there is a ton of great info in there.
    I would leave her crated when your not able to watch her 100% at least at first while she learns the rules of the house and you get to know her and find out how trust worthy she is. Teathering her to you when your around the house is a great idea at first it will teach her the boundaries and help you keep an eye on her. Exercise is key as well and letting her out in the back yard won't do it they need either to play with the other dogs or play fetch or take walks. Most labs if just let in the back yard will either dig, chew, eat the flowers, or just lay in the sun. They are normally very people oriented and want to be with them all the time (although there are some more independant labs)

    Good luck and feel free to ask away.

  8. #6
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    DefaultRe: new to labs

    The dog I believe is around 2 so hopefully within the next year she will be out growing the puppy stage but again I am going on what I know about airedales . My daughter is 9 almost 10, we have 2 other children 12 and 4 who are obviously use to large dogs. My biggest goal for now is teaching her manners in the house.

  9. #7
    jzgrlduff's Avatar
    jzgrlduff is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: new to labs

    Two years old, she should be starting to calm down some. Get your daughter on a routine to walk her daily, after school or whatever. It will be a huge help, plus strengthen the bond between the two of them.
    I assume she's spayed right? I would also sign up for a basic obedience class and have your daughter (or whoever will be the primary caregiver) take the lead with her in the class.

    Stick around here. You'll learn so much and we'll answer as many questions as we can for you. I agree with Barb too (bacatherine) check out the "our best advice" thread in the training section here.

    Good luck with her! What's her name anyway?



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  10. #8
    JacobAlthea&Tatum is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: new to labs

    Welcome!

    1. Consistent exercise is key. Teaching "heel" could very well be your biggest challenge. A gentle leader or a prong collar can help with keeping the lab from pulling your arm out of its socket when training this command
    2. Crate training! Many here (including me) are a big proponent of keeping the dog in a crate when she cannot be supervised.
    3. Labs a chewers
    4. labs shed a lot! They don't need baths; that will strip the essential oils from their coats. They benefit from a brushing every day. A Zoom Groom is a great choice for a brush.
    5. Labs are very smart. A bored lab will find trouble if there is any to be found.
    6. A new lab in your household could very well benefit from the "nothing in life is free" training method. This is basically a rule in which the dog must earn everything. Before going out or being fed, the dog must sit. A command must be followed to get a treat. This could help you and your new lab understand the hierarchy of the household.

    Labs are loving and smart. I recommend the "our best advice" thread, which should be posted at the top of the page.
    I'm Jenn. Keeper of two labs in my home and one forever in my heart.

    Throw the ball, damn it!

  11. #9
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    DefaultRe: new to labs

    Welcome to JL. I'm very familiar with Airedales. If you can handle them a lab should be a breeze since they want to please more than anything. You've been given good advice so I won't add anything except that you might try a basic obedience class.

  12. #10
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    DefaultRe: new to labs

    Unfortunatly she is not spayed, which will pose a problem when she is heat but I will jump that hurdle when I get to it. I do plan on crating her I too am a beleiver in that and have done it with every dog I've ever owned. Introducing her to the 2 we have will also be interesting but she is a female so I know they will take to her willingly,lol. tethering her and teaching basic obedience is 1st. we have an excellent dog trainer right up the road and I have been working with dogs professionally with dogs since I was 21. So I should be able to handle this I hope.

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