praise and punishmment
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Thread: praise and punishmment

  1. #1
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    Defaultpraise and punishmment

    OK i think i have a problem i would like to see if someone could help me with before it becomes real serious. Roxy seems to be getting a little aggressive when it comes to food and to out little dog yogi. the other day while yogi was eating his food i tried taking Roxy's food just to see how she would react. she growled at me so i took her food and i was saying bad girl she gave me a look i forget you and kind of attacked yogi into a corner and took his food. i tied her up as a punishment and i swear she gave me a weird look. it was a look like i don't care do what you want i will get my way. so i guess my question is what is the best way to punish her without hitting or hurting her. i am ashamed to say i have raised my hand to spank her in the rear a couple of times which is not really my intention by no means but i figured it is the only way to get the point across. please help! i don't want to hurt her but i do want to train her. sorry this is so long.

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  3. #2
    Trickster's Avatar
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    DefaultRe: praise and punishmment

    How old is Roxy? how old and what breed is Yogi? has she ever shown this type of behavior before?

    Food aggression can be cured but hitting or using punishment could potentially make the problem far worse.

    When you answer the questions I can tell you how I would stop this behavior using positive methods.

  4. #3
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    DefaultRe: praise and punishmment

    There is a ton of info out there on Food Agression in dogs. Try googling that term. I found this paragreph on one site:
    Food Aggression:

    Food aggression occurs when a dog feels it needs to be aggressive in order to protect a vital resource. If a dog or puppy has been deprived of food at some time in their lives, or perhaps had to fight over communal food bowls, it may be prone to food aggression. Here are a few tips to help avoid this happening:

    * Feed dogs individually such that they cannot eat each other's food.
    * Teach your dog that humans being near its food is a good thing. Try approaching your dog's food when they are eating and leaving some exciting treats next to their bowl. Do the same with bones and chews; tempt your dog away from them with even more tasty treats then allow them to return to their bowl or bone. Your dog will soon learn that you are not there to take its food but to give it even more pleasurable things to eat.
    * Never respond to food aggression with aggression yourself. This teaches your dog that they have to be even more aggressive to get their message through.

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  6. #4
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    DefaultRe: praise and punishmment

    Roxy is 7 months... yogi is 1 1/2... and hes is a malteese poodle mix. she has always been its my way or no way when it comes to yogi. since the first day we brought her home it was like she told him look i am the boss around here. i thought it was cute at first but maybe i let it go to long. as for not feeding her i feed her everyday. they both shared a bowl at one point because she kept tearing and braking yogi's bowls(teething process). but for the past 2 months atleast the have had their own bowls.

  7. #5
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    DefaultRe: praise and punishmment

    I'm not an expert by any means.. but my guess is that sharing bowls taught her that she had to be tough/aggressive to get more food.

    I would definitely keep them eating from separate bowls. I would also have Roxy eat somewhere else (like in a laundry room or bathroom). Maybe not being worried that Yogi will take her food will help?

  8. #6
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    DefaultRe: praise and punishmment

    but my guess is that sharing bowls taught her that she had to be tough/aggressive to get more food.
    That was my thought, too.

    When we brought Frankie home at 9 weeks, I tried feeding them together in the kitchen. Frankie would immediately go to Tucker's bowl and start eating his food. That was the one and only time. Frankie gets his food in his crate now.

    Can you feed one of them in a crate in a separate room?



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  9. #7
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    DefaultRe: praise and punishmment

    yes i can feed them in different rooms. i guess i will do that from now on. so now how can i teach her not to growl at me when i touch her food.

  10. #8
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    DefaultRe: praise and punishmment

    how can i teach her not to growl at me when i touch her food.
    You need to show her that you are no threat to her food. YOU are the giver of food and therefore you should be able to take it away. I would start the process by hand feeding her. Pick her bowl up and put the kibble in dish as normal. Make sure she is watching you. Sit down on a chair, place the bowl on your lap and have Roxy 'sit' in front of you. Begin hand feeding her. When you are done feeding, praise her gently and walk away. Repeat this for at least a week. After a week, progress from sitting on a chair and hand feeding her to sitting on the floor with the bowl in your lap. Repeat for another week as above.

    Next, place the bowl on the floor and have Roxy in a sit stay. Ask her to wait. Have a really tasty treat in your hand. Put your palm flat down in the bowl with the treat and give her the release command. Praise her after she takes it. Next time you try it, place her bowl WITH kibble in and do the same...palm out with treat. Release her for the treat and then allow her to eat her meal. Sit right next to her the whole time. When she finishes her meal, give her another treat, praise and walk away.

    Basically, you want to build up to the point where you can call her off her food for a treat AND put your hand in/next to the bowl without any reaction. If you take it slowly, it works.

  11. #9
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    DefaultRe: praise and punishmment

    My 15 yo TFterrier Twiggy eats next to my yellow lab Rush. Boo gets fed over about 6 feet away from the other two. When Twiggy would finish her dinner and go to leave the dining area, sometimes Boo would get aggressive, seeing her out of the corner of her eye and once actually attacked her. SO, we feed Twiggy out of Boo's sight and don't let her walk within eye shot of Boo until every one is finished and the bowls are up. We know that Boo was the smallest of the bunch when we got her and being from a litter of 9 she had to fight for food. Unfortunately she wasn't aggressive enough to get her share so she was probably hungry. We figure that is where her food aggression came from but it only surfaced when she got older and taller. Once she got considerably taller than Twiggy, that's when she started in. She isn't the least bit aggressive with her food towards us or towards Rush. Just Twiggy. So my suggestion is let your aggressive one know it is not tolerated by grabbing the scruff and in a stern loud voice tell her no!! But I would feed them out of eyesight of each other and be careful not to allow the smaller one near until all food is finished. As far as her being aggressive with you, I'd sit next to her when you feed her and talk in soft tones so she learns you are no threat.


  12. #10
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    DefaultRe: praise and punishmment

    My two big dogs tend to pick on my lil beagle because he eats SOOO slow. So I put him in the kennel and seperate the other two into different parts of the room. Does one of them eat slower? I know my collie will still try to go after my labs food because he eats slower. Even though she is smaller she still tries him. As far as aggresion, my pups have each growled at me ONE time. I don't agree with physical violence but I don't deal with aggresion. They have never growled since. It may seem weird, but I will put my pups on their back and hold them with me on top until they calm down and learn that I'm the boss. They don't like it at first they kinda kick, but they eventually stop. It's kinda like the Steve Irwin method. Hope that all helps.

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