pinch collar
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Thread: pinch collar

  1. #1
    was I crazy is offline Junior Member
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    I have two 1 year old labs, brother and sister (hence the user name). She falls within the normal Lab range. Weighs about 70 lbs. Very smart. They both are, both have been in obedience class and did really well. We still work with them everyday. Her brother is huge, he weighs 105 lbs. and they eat the same amount of food ( he was 2 lbs at birth, c-section). Up until about 2 months ago I could walk them both at the same time, but it's gotten to the point that I've gotten dragged down numerous times when he see's any birds (turkeys, pheasants, chickens )or mongoose. He heels perfectly, and then just bolts after them with me in tow. I'm finally at the point that I just let go. I don't want to get hurt again, and once he see's them he's got a one track mind. If he were in a fenced area it wouldn't be so bad, (not possible) but he doesn't look back once he starts and has almost made it up to a busy highway (About 7 acres away). Scared me to death. I'm starting to dread walking him, and yet I realize he needs the exercise (right now I'm spending at least 11/2 hours a day walking them separately. So to get to the point I was wondering if a pinch collar would help, because the gentle lead and choke chain (both) aren't doing it. He's tried to bolt a few times on my husband but he's a lot bigger than I am and was able to alpha him. I realize he is still in puppy mode, and will be for some time, but I need to keep him safe and me in one piece. I need some input, thanks

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    patm is offline Senior Member
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    I finally had to use a prong on my big boy - it made a world of difference. Just make sure that you get it fitted properly - you have to take them apart, not slip them over their heads (like I first did), they are actually pretty snug when they are on, but don't put any pressure on the dog until you pull it a little.. They are not to be used instead of training, but it sounds like one would help you with your big boy.

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    mitziandjudysmom is offline Senior Member
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    None of the above collars will work if a large dog really wants to bolt. A firm "leave it" obedience will work best. Mine will walk right past squirrels, cats, chipmonks, rabbits, and other critters they would normally chase in their yard. Also, I carry high value treats for when I see a potential distraction which they may get excited about. Put them in a sit and slowly feed them treats until distraction is gone. Or sometimes I walk past the distraction as I feed them treats. Remember, short leashes give you best control. If you get tense when you see a potential distraction, they will pick up on it and react. Good luck.

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    MicksMom is offline Senior Member
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    Yes, used properly, a pinch collar will help. But, in my opinion, the best solution is another round or two of training classes, or at least more practicing of what you learned in the classes you took. Also, like you said, they are both still really pups. And they're at that wonderful "terrible teens" point (they act like human teenagers).

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    Quote Originally Posted by mitziandjudysmom View Post
    None of the above collars will work if a large dog really wants to bolt. A firm "leave it" obedience will work best. Mine will walk right past squirrels, cats, chipmonks, rabbits, and other critters they would normally chase in their yard. Also, I carry high value treats for when I see a potential distraction which they may get excited about. Put them in a sit and slowly feed them treats until distraction is gone. Or sometimes I walk past the distraction as I feed them treats. Remember, short leashes give you best control. If you get tense when you see a potential distraction, they will pick up on it and react. Good luck.

    Ditto. If a gentle leader won't stop the bolting I don't think a prong will either, as it's much more easily ignored (in my experience). No equipment will replace the need to train, especially when it comes to loose leash walking.
    Kate
    Baloo - 5 year old black lab
    Peanut - 7 year old minpin
    Monster - 3-ish year old frenchie/jack, rescue
    We're Superdogs!


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    Labradorable's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mitziandjudysmom View Post
    None of the above collars will work if a large dog really wants to bolt. A firm "leave it" obedience will work best. Mine will walk right past squirrels, cats, chipmonks, rabbits, and other critters they would normally chase in their yard. Also, I carry high value treats for when I see a potential distraction which they may get excited about. Put them in a sit and slowly feed them treats until distraction is gone. Or sometimes I walk past the distraction as I feed them treats. Remember, short leashes give you best control. If you get tense when you see a potential distraction, they will pick up on it and react. Good luck.
    I agree. A prong collar might make him think twice about bolting, but if he wants to bolt he still will. More training is the best solution.
    ~Samantha
    Dozer (04/01/09) & Moose (01/02/13)
    Cybil (02/02/00 - 02/20/09)



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    Best combo: Training AND a pinch. With the goal of eventually weaning off the pinch and back onto a flat buckle once your LEAVE IT commands (or HEEL or SIT or anything else you're teaching w/the pinch) has become cemented.

    Kelrobin Cleveland Street Denizen, CGC, RN [Parker]

    "Dear George: Remember, no man is a failure who has friends. Thanks for the wings. Love, Clarence" -- IAWL Screenplay (1946)

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    by the way in your training you can set up the situations that cause you the problems. Borrow a bird in a cage and practice heeling around it. Borrow a rabbit and practice with that. Borrow a duck and practice with that. In obedience we call this Proofing, and it teaches the dog that no matter what happens or is near by that they still must listen and obey commands.

    Kelly and Amber
    Light, "weedy" individuals are definitely incorrect; equally objectionable are cloddy lumbering specimens. Labrador Retrievers shall be shown in working condition well-muscled and without excess fat. Females should weigh between 55 and 70lbs and Males between 65 and 80lbs. Height females 21.5 to 23.5 inches males 22.5 to 24.5 inches at the withers.

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    People who uses a prong collar have a dog who suffers a lot of proper training ...

    We never used such tool with all the dogs we've owned

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    dweck's Avatar
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    People who uses ESL to criticize other peoples and their choices of training tools is not being nice.

    Kelrobin Cleveland Street Denizen, CGC, RN [Parker]

    "Dear George: Remember, no man is a failure who has friends. Thanks for the wings. Love, Clarence" -- IAWL Screenplay (1946)

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