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  1. #1
    Lab Dad is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultEditorial Comments please-update 1

    Update 19/19/06 9:58p ET
    Thank you for your comments.* I am starting the re-write and will incorporate what I can.

    Labs are the most popular breed. I think the breed sells itself. When I started writing the original piece I had just gotten off the phone with the Local Lab Rescue contact.* I hope to be a volunteer for the group.* He told me about a couple of the dogs waiting to come into rescue. There have been several threads in the rescue section of labs that were killed because their time ran out before they could be adopted that still sadden me today.* That is why the piece has a somewhat darker tone.

    Labs sell themselves. Too well. There are so, so many in shelters and rescues that potential owners need a reality check before taking on a Lab, or any other dog for that matter.* I will try to put more positives and tweak it a bit so y'all can have another go at it.

    LD

    -------------
    I am writing a handout for a meet the breed handout.* *I have a rough draft that needs to be shredded, burned at the stake and dissected so I can write another draft.
    * Please give me other resources or books or question what I have written.* I am trying to be concise, candid and fact based. to give people resources.* Any suggestions are appreciated but I reserve the right to ignore graciously. Please be critical so I can write a better piece.

    Thanks
    LD

    Labrador Retrievers

    The Labrador retriever is one of the most popular breed of dogs in the United States. Thousands of Labradors are registered with the American Kennel Club each year, yet thousands of Labs are abandoned by their owners or surrendered to a shelter or rescue because the people have not made the commitment to understand the needs of the breed.* Before getting a Lab, there are several things to know.

    • There are three colors:
    Black
    Chocolate
    Yellow- runs from almost white through fox red
    • There is no such thing as a “rare” color, “silver”, “golden” or “white” Labrador retrievers.*
    • They shed. They shed every minute of every day 365 days a year. Sometimes more often
    • The body of the cute little Labrador puppy grows to 60-90 pounds in less than a year.* The mind of that little puppy takes about four years to catch up.
    • The Labrador retriever is susceptible to several genetic diseases including joint disease, heart disease, and eye diseases.
    • They are also prone to other medical conditions
    • The Labrador lives 12-16 years
    • The Labrador is an energetic dog that needs daily exercise and attention
    • Labs are people dogs.* They are not happy kept away from their people.

    If you decide to get a Lab:
     Decide before hand
    what the role of the dog will be
    who is going to care for it
    does our lifestyle suit a Lab?
     Lab Proof the house
    Anything with in mouth range belongs to the dog
     Spay/neuter
     Microchip the dog and get a dog license
     Find and use the services and advice of a veterinarian
     Take the Lab to obedience class
     Find something fun to do on a regularly with the Lab for the next 12 to 16 years

    The Puppy Route
    Pet Stores get their stock from brokers and commercial breeders often refereed to as Puppy Mills.* Puppy Mills are notorious for the conditions the dogs live in and the often poor health of the dogs.* Not a good place to find a long time companion.

    Newspapers and bulletin boards are used by people whose dog got pregnant or are lured by money, or just want their dog to have puppies because they are so good.* Often refereed to as backyard breeders, these dogs may or not be tested, often not and little to no thought goes into the pedigree.

    Some breeders advertise on The Internet, accept credit cards and will ship their dogs anywhere. Not a good sign, particularly if they breed more than one or two breeds.

    Most responsible breeders research pedigrees and their dogs have competed in the show ring or at hunt trials and have been titled.* Getting a mortgage at favorable rates is easier than getting them to sell one of their dogs. There are usually waiting lists, and the breeder will ask lots of questions and if not satisfied, will not sell a dog.* If they do sell, it is by contract, you will probably need to spay/neuter, and if you decide to get rid of the dog, it goes back to the breeder. They will also provide lots of information and be available to answer questions.

    Labs end up on the street for all kinds of excuses.* From chewing up shoes, shedding, knocking over the baby or not matching the décor or being too old. The number of dogs that end up in shelters and Animal Control facilities each year is staggering.* Animal Control will hold a dog for a finite period of time.* If the dog is not claimed, it is euthanized because they do not have room for the number of dogs they pick up.* Shelters try, but the number of kill shelters outnumber the no kill.* Both types of shelters are on very tight budgets and occasionally sick animals infect healthy ones.* The luck dogs are picked up by rescue organizations.

    Rescue organizations pull Labs from shelters and animal control facilities, nurse the dogs back to health and care for the dogs until forever homes are found.* They also take on owner surrendered dogs.* The number of Labs that need rescue far out paces the ability to place them in rescue.*

    Adopting a rescue has many good points.* It gives a Lab a second chance.* They have been evaluated, they have had some training, and they are looking for companionship.* Some Labs may have had health issues, some may have been injured, some may have been abused and require special care, but the love they have to offer is unconditional.

    Books:
    Labrador retrievers
    A Dummy’s Guide to Labrador retrievers
    An Idiots Guide to Labrador retrievers
    The Life of your Lab
    The Labrador retriever Handbook

    Canine Behavior
    The Other End of the Leash
    How to Speak Dog
    Cesar’s Way

    Adopting from shelters and rescues

    Second-Hand Dog: How to Turn Yours into a First-Rate Pet (Howell Reference Books) by Carol Lea Benjamin

    Adoptable Dog: Teaching Your Adopted Pet to Obey, Trust, and Love You John Ross, Barbara McKinney

    Successful Dog Adoption Sue Sternberg

    Adopt the Perfect Dog by Gwen Bailey

    Adopting a Dog: The Indispensable Guide for Your Newest Family Member (Paperback)
    by John Ross, Barbara McKinney

    Second Chance
    A Tale of Two Puppies Judy Masrud (Author), Cathy Pool (Illustrations by)

    Kippy: Second Chance Dog : Susan E. Mann* ISBN: 0-7414-2745-1 ©2005


    Internet Resources

    www.justlabradors.com

    http://www.gglrc.org/pickingapuppy/l...wnership.shtml

    http://www.woodhavenlabs.com/breeding.html

    http://www.labbies.com/

    http://www.akc.org

    http://www.thelabradorclub.com

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  3. #2
    Cinder4evr is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: Editorial Comments please

    I like it the way it is.

    Short to the point, short sentences. Print it on shiny paper with lots of cartoons and people will at least pick it up and look at it.

  4. #3
    AngusFangus is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: Editorial Comments please

    I guess the first things I would ask are, who is your audience? What would you like to motivate them to do? How will people receive this handout?

    Just trying to visualize who will be reading this and how it will be used


    Connie and "The Boys":
    Angus, Yellow Lab, CGC, RE, CD
    Simon, d.b.a. Flat Coated Retriever, CGC, RE, CD

    Gone ahead, but forever in my heart:
    Crash, Pit Bull x Rottweiler x Golden Retriever

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  6. #4
    Lab Dad is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: Editorial Comments please

    This is for a Meet the Breed day at the local dog training club. People who may be interested in acquiring a Lab or other breed may come by the club and get to meet various breeds of dogs. We will have the furkids with us. Baby and Jack will be giving away free Lab hair and Lab drool to anyone interested. I wanted to have something to hand out to people if they ask for information about Labs

  7. #5
    AngusFangus is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: Editorial Comments please

    Baby and Jack will be giving away free Lab hair and Lab drool to anyone interested.


    OK, gotcha!

    I will read this again and think about it a little more, but one thing I think might help is to break things up into categories with subheads. Like, Lab Facts. Pros of having a Lab. Cons of having a Lab. Health. Safety.

    Does that make sense? I don't know if should be those exact categories. Well, except I do like the idea of a list of Pros along with a list of Cons. I like your bullets, but maybe those could be further broken down into distinct categories. ?

    I really like all the info at the bottom about where you could get a Lab. Just give it subheads and it's good to go!

    I'm all about some subheads, aren't I? Well, this is what I do all day, every day. Try to make things appealing and easy for people to read. A lot of it is breaking big things down into small, bite-sized chunks of information.

    Are you going to elaborate a little bit on some of the stuff under, "If you decide to get a Lab?" Like, maybe some verbage on how to decide if a Lab fits your lifestyle.

    Well, these are my thoughts and you are of course free to ignore! ;D Hope this is helpful in some way.


    Connie and "The Boys":
    Angus, Yellow Lab, CGC, RE, CD
    Simon, d.b.a. Flat Coated Retriever, CGC, RE, CD

    Gone ahead, but forever in my heart:
    Crash, Pit Bull x Rottweiler x Golden Retriever

  8. #6
    lcspt is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: Editorial Comments please

    We just did Community Days at Newark, DE at the University of Delaware campus. We had alot of our club members there with their dogs for meet and greet.

    The woman that runs the information booth and keeps handouts stocked has a large binder for each AKC group and in it has pages of info on each breed in that group. The copies are for the public to take home with them. I haven't looked closely at them since I don't do alot of work with the info booth. (More involved in the performance end of getting information out to the public ... ie obedience and CGC testing).

    I liked what you have written. I would make sure that it fits on one page (just front or front and back).
    "In moments of joy all of us wished we possessed a tail we could wag." W. H. Auden

    Linda, Kona and Bo

  9. #7
    WigWag Guest

    DefaultRe: Editorial Comments please

    The Labrador retriever is one of the most popular breed of dogs in the United States. Thousands of Labradors are registered with the American Kennel Club each year, yet thousands of Labs are abandoned by their owners or surrendered to a shelter or rescue because the people have not made the commitment to understand the needs of the breed. Before getting a Lab, there are several things to know.

    The Labrador retriever is THE most popular breed of dog in the United States by tens of thousands if not more. Approximately 138,000 Labradors were registered by the AKC last year compared to the second place Golden retriever who had 48,000.


    • There are three colors:
    Black
    Chocolate
    Yellow- runs from almost white through fox red
    • There is no such thing as a “rare” color, “silver”, “golden” or “white” Labrador retrievers.
    • They shed. They shed every minute of every day 365 days a year. Sometimes more often
    • The body of the cute little Labrador puppy grows to 60-90 pounds in less than a year. The mind of that little puppy takes about four years to catch up.
    • The Labrador retriever is susceptible to several genetic diseases including joint disease, heart disease, and eye diseases.
    • They are also prone to other medical conditions
    • The Labrador lives 12-16 years
    • The Labrador is an energetic dog that needs daily exercise and attention
    • Labs are people dogs. They are not happy kept away from their people.
    You make it sound like they are a bad breed to get! What about the positives????? I also have not found that Labradors shed any more than other breeds and my dogs are very calm and laid back even as puppies. I think saying that it takes them four years to mature is not all that accurate. I would simply say that they are large and energetic dogs who enjoy an active lifestyle in order to be calm housedogs. Also I would add that they are great family dogs. I would also say something like "The Labrador retriever is susceptible to several hereditary orthopedic conditions, a heart condition called Tricuspid Valve Dysplasia, and an eye disease called Progressive Retinal Atrophy that causes blindness as well as other heretible conditions such as epilepsy." "Heart disease" and "eye diseases" make it sound like they get all sorts of ailments of both organs.

    If you decide to get a Lab:
     Decide before hand
    what the role of the dog will be
    who is going to care for it
    does our lifestyle suit a Lab?
     Lab Proof the house
    Anything with in mouth range belongs to the dog
     Spay/neuter
     Microchip the dog and get a dog license
     Find and use the services and advice of a veterinarian
     Take the Lab to obedience class
     Find something fun to do on a regularly with the Lab for the next 12 to 16 years

    The Puppy Route
    Pet Stores get their stock from brokers and commercial breeders often reffered to as Puppy Mills. Puppy Mills are notorious for the conditions the dogs live in and the often poor health of the dogs. Not a good place to find a long time companion.

    Newspapers and bulletin boards are used by people whose dog got pregnant or are lured by money, or just want their dog to have puppies because they are so good. Often reffered to as backyard breeders, these dogs may or not be tested, often not and little to no thought goes into the pedigree.

    Some breeders advertise on The Internet, accept credit cards and will ship their dogs anywhere. Not a good sign, particularly if they breed more than one or two breeds.

    Most responsible breeders research pedigrees and their dogs have competed in the show ring or at hunt trials and have been titled. Getting a mortgage at favorable rates is easier than getting them to sell one of their dogs. There are usually waiting lists, and the breeder will ask lots of questions and if not satisfied, will not sell a dog. If they do sell, it is by contract, you will probably need to spay/neuter, and if you decide to get rid of the dog, it goes back to the breeder. They will also provide lots of information and be available to answer questions.

    Labs end up on the street for all kinds of excuses. From chewing up shoes, shedding, knocking over the baby or not matching the décor or being too old. The number of dogs that end up in shelters and Animal Control facilities each year is staggering. Animal Control will hold a dog for a finite period of time. If the dog is not claimed, it is euthanized because they do not have room for the number of dogs they pick up. Shelters try, but the number of kill shelters outnumber the no kill. Both types of shelters are on very tight budgets and occasionally sick animals infect healthy ones. The luck dogs are picked up by rescue organizations.

    Rescue organizations pull Labs from shelters and animal control facilities, nurse the dogs back to health and care for the dogs until forever homes are found. They also take on owner surrendered dogs. The number of Labs that need rescue far out paces the ability to place them in rescue.

    Adopting a rescue has many good points. It gives a Lab a second chance. They have been evaluated, they have had some training, and they are looking for companionship. Some Labs may have had health issues, some may have been injured, some may have been abused and require special care, but the love they have to offer is unconditional.

    Books:
    Labrador retrievers
    A Dummy’s Guide to Labrador retrievers
    An Idiots Guide to Labrador retrievers
    The Life of your Lab
    The Labrador retriever Handbook

    Canine Behavior
    The Other End of the Leash
    How to Speak Dog
    Cesar’s Way

    Adopting from shelters and rescues

    Second-Hand Dog: How to Turn Yours into a First-Rate Pet (Howell Reference Books) by Carol Lea Benjamin

    Adoptable Dog: Teaching Your Adopted Pet to Obey, Trust, and Love You John Ross, Barbara McKinney

    Successful Dog Adoption Sue Sternberg

    Adopt the Perfect Dog by Gwen Bailey

    Adopting a Dog: The Indispensable Guide for Your Newest Family Member (Paperback)
    by John Ross, Barbara McKinney

    Second Chance
    A Tale of Two Puppies Judy Masrud (Author), Cathy Pool (Illustrations by)

    Kippy: Second Chance Dog : Susan E. Mann ISBN: 0-7414-2745-1 ©2005


    Internet Resources

    www.justlabradors.com

    http://www.gglrc.org/pickingapuppy/l...wnership.shtml

    http://www.woodhavenlabs.com/breeding.html

    http://www.labbies.com/

    http://www.akc.org

    http://www.thelabradorclub.com

  10. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    175

    DefaultRe: Editorial Comments please

    I agree with WigWag...the overall impression that I got was that 1) there are a lot of bad breeders and only a very small number of good ones and 2) that it is NOT a good thing to own a lab....which would not lead one to rescue a lab from a shelter.

    The section on rescuing/adopting was good but as I've said already, it was preceeded by what appeared to be only the negatives in the breed....I would start with the statistics (AkC registration numbers) and positives (trustworthy and loyal companion dogs, high intelligence etc) and then perhaps a question such as "Is the Labrador the breed for your family" in big bold font which is then followed by bullet list of* the facts of inherited diseases, shedding, high energy, needs to work,* etc.

    Then perhaps a section (So you still want a Labrador?) on the adopting of a lab from a) the many abandoned puppies and adult dogs waiting to be rescued from shelters b) reputable breeders who improve the breed by the testing and proving of their sires and dams and the study of appropriate breeding lines followed by a paragraph on the puppy mills, puppy stores and backyard breeders.

    Then end with something that reminds them to spay or neuter to help with the overpopulation of labs.

    I think it is a very good beginning but just needs to re-organized in such a way that the objective is reached (which I believe is to explain the pros and cons of the breed, encourage rescue and responsible purchasing).....Good for you for taking this on!

  11. #9
    Buckyball's Avatar
    Buckyball is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: Editorial Comments please

    Over all it looks good. But as a couple others said...you need to add the pros of owning a labby When I read it it felt like the piece was just telling me why not to get a lab. You want the read to know why they'd want a lab for a pet as well .

    It's grea that you are doing this though! Good job!
    <3 01/01/2006-03/18/2017 <3

  12. #10
    Trickster's Avatar
    Trickster is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: Editorial Comments please

    I agree with adding something about the pro's of owning a Lab. One thing I would mention would be their versatility --Labs are canine "all rounders"; guide dogs, therapy dogs, police dogs, gun dogs, performance dogs (obedience, agility, search and rescue, etc.) and most importantly, one of the best family pets and companions.

    I would also emphasise their intelligence and need for lots of activity. A lot of people who are clueless about our breed seem to be under the impression that Labradors can be "crazy" or "terrible chewers". Both are true if the dog doesn't get the physical and mental stimulation they require.

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