Difference in english/american labs
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Thread: Difference in english/american labs

  1. #1
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    DefaultDifference in english/american labs

    Been trying to talk SU into getting a chocolate labby (may as well have one of each viety ) I'd prefer to get a younger girl as Happy tends to like females a bit more than males. I'd also like to get one from a rescue center, is there a way to tell if they'll be leaner like my two or stockier like the more english labs? My cousins have two chocolate labs that are older than lucky and much smaller and stockier, but I don't remember them looking much different when they were all itty bitty and cute. Anybody help me out here?

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    DefaultRe: Difference in english/american labs

    Quote Originally Posted by LuckyGirl
    Been trying to talk SU into getting a chocolate labby (may as well have one of each viety ) I'd prefer to get a younger girl as Happy tends to like females a bit more than males. I'd also like to get one from a rescue center, is there a way to tell if they'll be leaner like my two or stockier like the more english labs? My cousins have two chocolate labs that are older than lucky and much smaller and stockier, but I don't remember them looking much different when they were all itty bitty and cute. Anybody help me out here?

    They have the split in the UK as well. It depends on if you go with Field or Conformation lines.



  4. #3
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    DefaultRe: Difference in english/american labs

    I think you can tell by looking at them when they are about 3 to 4 months old if they have field or bench lines in them.
    Olie

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    Trickster is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: Difference in english/american labs

    The correct terms are "show" and "field", not English and American. If you think about it, the whole English and American thing makes no sense --that implies that all English Labs from England (like mine --I am in the UK) are of the show type and all American Labs from the USA are of the field type. Simply not true. As Yellardawg rightly said, we also have the field/show breed split just like the USA.

    I'd also like to get one from a rescue center, is there a way to tell if they'll be leaner like my two or stockier like the more english labs?
    If you get a Lab puppy from a shelter, it won't be either a field or a show type dog. Most shelter pups are from pet breeding's so are techincally pet bred --the most common type of Labrador. Most pet breds look fieldy but they are definitely NOT field or show bred regardless of what they look like.

    To get an actual show or field type dog, you will have to go to a breeder who specializes in them. A show puppy from good lines will have a lot of 'CH's (champions) in the pedigree. A field puppy from good lines will have lots of 'FT.CH.' (field trial champion) in the pedigree. Duel perpose dogs (show dogs that also work in the field) may have an assortment of different titles from each area. Both parents should have titles and health clearances.


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    AngusFangus is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: Difference in english/american labs

    Agree w/Trickster.

    If you're really curious about predicting what they will look like, go to breeder sites and look at puppy pictures and compare them with what the adults look like. At this point, I think I could recognize a bench puppy vs. a field puppy. But this only after a lot of looking at puppy photos on JL. :P

    I also agree w/Trickster in that most, but not all, rescued dogs/puppies are probably going to look more "fieldy." Where I'm from in the U.S., anyway.


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    DefaultRe: Difference in english/american labs

    We got lucky from a breeder though I didn't get any papers on her or anything like that, we didn't really consider all that stuff. Lucky is just really lean and long legged. I wouldn't mind getting the show? chocolate labby I'd just like one to be around the same size as our lucky girl and happy boy. Though I'm sure SU would rather have a 'smaller' lab. Vet thinks Lucky might top out at 100lbs Happy's sitting proud at 68lbs. So ...... I dunno!!! Any tips on when I go to a rescue? Happy's a rescue and he just stole my heart with his food bowl in his mouth and his happy tail (that had to be amputated a week after I got him!! )

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    DefaultRe: Difference in english/american labs

    Mainly the accent. British dogs have that weird accent whereas American dogs have more of a Southern drawl. :P

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    DefaultRe: Difference in english/american labs

    lol sorry for the wrong use of termology! :P

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    DefaultRe: Difference in english/american labs

    I wouldn't mind getting the show?
    If you want a show type dog, you will have to go to a show type breeder. Of course, if you want a rescue, techincally no matter what they look like, they won't be show types --not that it makes them any less of a brilliant pet. Who knows...you may find the "look" you want in a rescue.

    I'd just like one to be around the same size as our lucky girl and happy boy.
    Easy with an adult rescue, not so easy with a pup. As I said in my previous post, most rescue puppies are from pet or BYB breedings so weight/size of the dogs as adults can vary tremendously. On the other hand, puppies from reputable breeders tend to be much easier to estimate for adult height/weight due to consistency in the breeding.

    Any tips on when I go to a rescue?
    Depends on what you are looking for and your individual requirements.

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    DefaultRe: Difference in english/american labs

    I think I'm putting to much thought into this! LOL You know I just knew when I saw Happy he was the dog for me, and when we looked at all the puppies. The rolly tumbly solid one was just the right one for us! I think I'll know when I find him/her.

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