Interesting Picture from History
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Thread: Interesting Picture from History

  1. #1
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    DefaultInteresting Picture from History

    I do a lot of historical research in connection with my job. I ran across this picture taken in 1889 out in Custer County Nebraska by Solomon Butcher. It sure looks like one of the long legged Labs many of us favor around here. Question, when did Labs start coming into this country? I know they started coming in on the East Coast, but when? The fact this guy has a repeating shotgun less than 2 years old means he has some money. With the railroads creeping in one could have had one shipped easily enough, the region is one of natural lakes and there were many out in that region hunting ducks for the market.


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  3. #2
    Katy Guest

    DefaultRe: Interesting Picture from History

    OOh, very cool picture. I agree, that does look like a lab.

  4. #3
    RangerMom is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: Interesting Picture from History

    Interesting picture. Thanks for posting. I can't help you with your question about labs although I'm sure someone will chime in.

    Blackie and Ranger ...............................Reggie: 1996-2010 "Fly Reggie Fly"

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    Mel
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    DefaultRe: Interesting Picture from History

    How interesting! I'm always intrigued by historical pictures. Geez! Look at the dangling participles on that dog!

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    AngusFangus is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: Interesting Picture from History

    Wow, that IS a cool picture!

    Here's what Barron's Encyclopedia of Dog Breeds says about the history of Labs:

    The original Labradors were all-purpose water dogs originating in Newfoundland, not Labrador. Not only did the breed not originate in Labrador, but it also was not originally called the Labrador Retriever. The Newfoundland of the early 1800s came in different sizes, one of which was the "Lesser" or "St. John's" Newfoundland - the earliest incarnation of the Labrador.

    These dogs - medium-sized black dogs with close hair - not only retrieved game but also retrieved fish, pulled small fishing boats through icy water, and helped the fishermen in any task involving swimming. Eventually the breed died out in Newfoundland in large part because of a heavy dog tax.

    However, a core of Labradors had been taken to England in the early 1800s, and it is from these dogs, along with crosses to other retrievers, that the breed continued. It was also in England that the breed earned its reputation as an extraordinary retriever of upland game.

    Initially breeders favored black Labs, and culled yellow or chocolate colors. By the early 1900s, the other colors had become acceptable, although still not as widely favored as the blacks.

    The breed was recognized by the English Kennel Club in 1903 and by the AKC in 1917. The popularity of this breed has grown steadily until it became the most popular breed in America in 1991 and remains so today.


    Connie and "The Boys":
    Angus, Yellow Lab, CGC, RE, CD
    Simon, d.b.a. Flat Coated Retriever, CGC, RE, CD

    Gone ahead, but forever in my heart:
    Crash, Pit Bull x Rottweiler x Golden Retriever

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    labby's Avatar
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    DefaultRe: Interesting Picture from History

    That dog has a docked tail. I'd say its a GSP or Vizsla. That isn't a Lab.



    Laura





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    DefaultRe: Interesting Picture from History

    Thanks, that is about what I understood, this collection exists as 6X8 glass negatives and is on-line and allows a lot of enhancement. I was zeroing in on the 1887 Winchester shotgun when the lab cleared up.

    For those who are not sure of who Solomon Butcher was, he is the one who took most of the sod house pictures you see in history books. What made him so famous is he saved his neagatives and sold them to The Nebraska State Historical Society in 1915 and helped catalog them. I have seen several pointers and what appear to be Newfoundlands, but this is the first Lab i've seen in any historic picture of around that date and I study them by the thousands. I posted it on one of the historical boards also.

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    labby's Avatar
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    DefaultRe: Interesting Picture from History

    That is NOT a Lab. Look at the docked tail.



    Laura





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    DefaultRe: Interesting Picture from History

    From http://www.faqs.org/faqs/dogs-faq/breeds/labradors/

    Labradors were first imported to the United States during World War I.
    At this point, the AKC still classified them as "Retrievers;" it was
    not until the late 1920's that the retrievers were split up into the
    breeds we know today in the AKC. The Labrador Retriever has been used
    heavily in the US as a gundog; the American Labrador Retriever Club,
    Inc. (LRC, Inc), is to this day primarily a field trial organization,
    and it was instrumental in forming the AKC field trials.
    That picture is NOT of a Labrador.



    Laura





  12. #10
    Paddysmom's Avatar
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    DefaultRe: Interesting Picture from History

    Laura, unless it was a practice back then, Vizsla's tails aren't usually docked are they? I've only met two personally, at the pond where I swim Paddy and Seamus and they had rather longer, sort of thin wispy swishy tails.

    Now, a GSP I could see in that photo.

    Seamus and Flynn

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