Are labs adaptable?
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12

Thread: Are labs adaptable?

  1. #1
    Dyeam is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    2

    DefaultAre labs adaptable?

    I have wanted a Lab for a while, but since I'm not a very outdoorsy kind of guy, and spend most of my time in the gym, I just wrote them off as I thought I would not be able to provide enough exercise for a lab. Well today, I met with a friend who I have not seen in a while and it turns out he has a 2 yr old lab. We get to talking about Labs and how I wanted one but probably shouldnt because of the exercise. He tells me he had the same concerns but decided to give it a go anyways. Turns out, he only gave his dog daily walks up till he was about one. Now, he pretty much just chills around the house and gets let out to the yard to pee and poo, and he is a happy dog.

    The point is, are Labs generally adaptable? Will they make it work with the amount of exercise you are willing to give them? Or did my friend just get lucky with his?

  2. Remove Advertisements
    JustLabradors.com
    Advertisements
     

  3. #2
    nicole's Avatar
    nicole is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    806

    Default

    I wouldn't call your friend lucky, I'd say he's not giving the dog what it should get but yes, unfortunately the dog has accepted it. You spend your time at the gym... you should be able to easily understand that there's a difference between existing and thriving

    That being said, you don't need to be an outdoor adventure enthusiast but you should plan on giving a dog adequate amounts of exercise on a regular basis.

  4. #3
    KathyArch is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Beaverton, MI
    Posts
    1,238

    Default

    All I can say is if Jack (15 months old) doesn't get enough excercise he can be a bit of a pain. He'll chill in the house all day (if he HAS too) if it's needed for some reason...but he'll be very restless at night. Not "bad" but restless, he tosses and turns and wakes up a lot. Huffing and puffing. He's a much, much happier dog if he gets an hour or so of running around, chasing his ball. If you want a "couch potato" dog, there are breeds that fit that.

  5. Remove Advertisements
    JustLabradors.com
    Advertisements
     

  6. #4
    amazongold's Avatar
    amazongold is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    SE MI
    Posts
    23,457

    Default

    Some Labs are couch potatoes, content to lay around most of the time, but that is a small percentage. If you have a fenced yard and can get your dog out to play ball for a while every day, that would help. Walks are better, that allows the dog to see and interact with different things, and it would get you some fresh air instead of stinky, stale gym air.
    Jackie, Champ, and Buddy

  7. #5
    Tanya is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    7,797

    Default

    it's MORE than exercise. you need not only time to exercise a dog but spend time training and bonding with a dog, just being with them. It's not fair to have a dog if you are rarely home.

    Labs, and all dogs, are adaptable. And within any breed, you have variation in needs. If you are home enough and want a dog, but not go to the dog park or run it for a few hours a day, then consider a rescue adult. A dog that isn't a puppy, in need of a home and who's exercise and training requirements are lower and would be happy with a nice walk daily.

    But again, remember it's more than just finding an hour to walk the dog, but you need to give a dog quality of life by ensuring he or she is not alone all the time.

    Dogs are a lifestyle. They don't have to change your ENTIRE life but you do need to make changes to YOUR life to fit a dog in. For some it means not going out for drinks with buddies after work because the dog has been alone all day. Or doing part of the workout outside with the dog. Finding a dog walker if you have to work overtime. (especially for singles, if you are a couple then you have a second person to offset some of those things).
    Last edited by Tanya; 08-03-2013 at 11:59 AM.
    Charlie (foster) and Rocky

  8. #6
    kaisdad's Avatar
    kaisdad is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    12,170

    Default

    If you aren't prepared to give a dog (any breed) the exercise it needs, please get yourself a stuffed animal toy to leave on your couch or bed. A sedentary life as a fashion accessory is no life for a sporting dog.

  9. #7
    J.R.&JNE's Avatar
    J.R.&JNE is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    San Diego
    Posts
    437

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tanya View Post
    it's MORE than exercise. you need not only time to exercise a dog but spend time training and bonding with a dog, just being with them. It's not fair to have a dog if you are rarely home.

    Labs, and all dogs, are adaptable. And within any breed, you have variation in needs. If you are home enough and want a dog, but not go to the dog park or run it for a few hours a day, then consider a rescue adult. A dog that isn't a puppy, in need of a home and who's exercise and training requirements are lower and would be happy with a nice walk daily.

    But again, remember it's more than just finding an hour to walk the dog, but you need to give a dog quality of life by ensuring he or she is not alone all the time.

    Dogs are a lifestyle. They don't have to change your ENTIRE life but you do need to make changes to YOUR life to fit a dog in. For some it means not going out for drinks with buddies after work because the dog has been alone all day. Or doing part of the workout outside with the dog. Finding a dog walker if you have to work overtime. (especially for singles, if you are a couple then you have a second person to offset some of those things).
    Very well written. I wish that more people did their research before getting a dog. It is a 15 YEAR (God willing) commitment every day of your life.


    J.R. and June


  10. #8
    mitziandjudysmom's Avatar
    mitziandjudysmom is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    NE Ohio
    Posts
    9,429

    Default

    What everyone else has posted. In addition, your friend's 2 year old couch potato is still young, but he will pack on the pounds if that life style continues. Everyone who has a dog has the responsibility to keep him healthy.

  11. #9
    slackercodemonkey is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    537

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tanya View Post
    it's MORE than exercise. you need not only time to exercise a dog but spend time training and bonding with a dog, just being with them. It's not fair to have a dog if you are rarely home.

    Labs, and all dogs, are adaptable. And within any breed, you have variation in needs. If you are home enough and want a dog, but not go to the dog park or run it for a few hours a day, then consider a rescue adult. A dog that isn't a puppy, in need of a home and who's exercise and training requirements are lower and would be happy with a nice walk daily.

    But again, remember it's more than just finding an hour to walk the dog, but you need to give a dog quality of life by ensuring he or she is not alone all the time.

    Dogs are a lifestyle. They don't have to change your ENTIRE life but you do need to make changes to YOUR life to fit a dog in. For some it means not going out for drinks with buddies after work because the dog has been alone all day. Or doing part of the workout outside with the dog. Finding a dog walker if you have to work overtime. (especially for singles, if you are a couple then you have a second person to offset some of those things).
    I agree!

  12. #10
    Dyeam is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kaisdad View Post
    If you aren't prepared to give a dog (any breed) the exercise it needs, please get yourself a stuffed animal toy to leave on your couch or bed. A sedentary life as a fashion accessory is no life for a sporting dog.
    No need to be condescending. Better I ask this now then 2 years after owning an unhappy dog.


    To everyone else, thanks for the advice and it has helped. I will not be getting a dog for a while but when I do I'll think long and hard whether I can give it what it needs.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Looking for Labs
    By godfather in forum Hunting/Field Trials
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 02-19-2010, 02:08 PM
  2. Replies: 12
    Last Post: 03-25-2008, 07:52 PM
  3. labs? or not labs? that is the question....
    By ShadowDancin in forum Lab Chat
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 09-09-2007, 02:21 AM
  4. Replies: 14
    Last Post: 08-29-2007, 09:49 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25