Is a lab for us?
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Thread: Is a lab for us?

  1. #1
    BexBoo is offline Junior Member
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    DefaultIs a lab for us?

    Hi, My name is Rebecca. My husband David desperately wants a chocolate lab.

    He has always wanted one and had a lab/collie mix dog as a kid.
    I think they are cute but I worry about a few things.

    1) we have 2 cats.. Harriet "Hattie" is a tonkinese and Fergus is a Ragdoll. They are 6 months old and a delight (whilst very naughty! lol)
    we also have a rabbit Willoughby and a guinea pig Edmund, but im less worried about them as they have their own big enclosure.

    I want a dog that will be good with the kittens. My cousins have a burmese cat and two poodles and they love each other to death! Fergus is a very large cat but even still, the size difference between him and a lab will be massive! SO I worry that they won't bond

    2) The dog will be mainly indoors. Our new house is massive. 3 storeys, 7 bedrooms, a pool etc. but there isn't a huge amount of backyard. Definitely enough for a dog but I want a dog that will be with us, in the house etc. So I worry that the dog will be too big for inside. That being said I've heard labs shed ALOT, I really don't want to have to sweep the floor 3 times a day etc. I really want a dog that can sit on the lounge with us (and not shed everywhere) or share our bed. I don't like dogs being left outside all the time etc.

    I will have time to play with it through the day. I teach music privately so I have breaks where I duck home etc. I am not so confident about the walking every day but definitely vigourous stick chasings and other games Hubby will more than likely run with him or her.

    SO... is a lab for us? Or are we better with another dog.. I'd love to make hubby happy,, but also want to make the right animal choice for us because pets are forever!

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  3. #2
    tammyhuffman is offline Senior Member
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    I have 2 cats, a 6 y/o Lab/Border Collie mix and a 21 mo old Lab, I have had Labs and cats forever, they co-exist quite well. Labs do shed, a lot. It is manageable but they are dogs that do shed. They also require daily exercise. Is a Lab for you? Personally I think you have quite a bit more homework to do before making that decision, I am glad you are doing that. I will say I would give up my hubby before I gave up having a Lab in my life if it was a choice I got to make. Just saying...
    Tammy
    Maxx & Emma Jean
    Ozzy - 10/16/02 - 06/28/11 - Always in my heart.

    Sometimes the hardest part isn't letting go - but learning to start over.

  4. #3
    Top Of The Hill is offline Senior Member
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    Like Tammy said.......labs do shed, a lot. Honestly I could vacuum a couple of times a day to keep the fur off the floors (I don't usually).......and our socks would still have yellow fur stuck to the bottom of them. LOL Not sure if my lab sheds more than most, but my last lab was pretty much the same, so if the fur/shedding issue is a problem for you you might want to do a little more research into breeds. Exercise needs.....My lab is pretty low energy, but she still needs her daily walks. The house and yard wouldn't be enough for her. In fact I'm sure she finds the yard pretty boring for the most part and she likes to be wherever we are. Some labs are much higher energy and require more exercise. I don't have cats now, but with my last lab I did and they were great friends. I'm sure this varies from dog to dog and cat to cat, but I'd guess most are adaptable once they get used to each other. They are great dogs (can be a handful as pups and puppyhood can last for quite some time ) and my favorite breed of course, but it's good that you're doing some research first before jumping in. Hopefully you'll get more replies here.

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  6. #4
    Samson is offline Senior Member
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    Unless you have OCD then the love of a Lab far far outweighs the accompanying tumbleweed.

    I have three cats and the cats and dogs love each other to the extent that they sleep together and groom each other ( well that's more the cats cleaning the dogs than vice versa ) On occasion, my youngest Lab will follow the cat outdoors and will end up chasing it, but that's just him playing and the cats easily get out of his way !

    I had one dog before I got the cats, but I introduced a puppy later on and the cats never had a problem with him. I expect that there was a lot of shouting involved in the early days ( memory fails me ) but all dogs have to be trained anyway and leaving the cat alone is a training issue.

    Ragdolls are prima donnas any way so I can't see a dog troubling him - not sure about Tonks but suspect that they are as bold as Siamese so again no problem that I can see.

    Back to the Lab Hair ! I confess that it is a lot of shedding. However, don't be misled by Labradoodle breeders either as some Labradoodles also shed hair and are most definitely not hypoallergenic Hypoallergenic dog breed - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Like the other say well done for researching and if hairs will really bother you then look elsewhere. You will however be missing out on a truly amazing breed ( am I biased - yes )

    You want an indoor velcro dog then a Lab's for you !

  7. #5
    Samson is offline Senior Member
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    Oh and I almost forgot - no stick chasing ! Very dangerous for the dog ! stick with balls whatever breed that you get !

  8. #6
    dek
    dek is offline Senior Member
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    As the other have said, labs are definitely indoor dogs that want to be with their people.
    If your husband wants to go running with a dog you should consider adopting an older dog. Jogging with them isn't advised until they're at least 18 months old to help prevent bone/joint problems.
    Energy levels vary widely with labs. Some need fairly heavy daily exercise and some are more mellow, so you can work with a breeder or rescue to try to get one that fits with your household better.
    As for the shedding......well the others have said it. Mine sheds pretty constantly, but I can't say it actually bothers me. It's just part of life with a lab and I love having a lab in my life.



  9. #7
    KathyArch is offline Senior Member
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    Sound like you have great advice here. I agree with it all. To be totally honest, I just posted here so you could see pics of my chocolate

  10. #8
    Tanya is offline Senior Member
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    based just on what you wrote i'd say adopting a 3-5 year old lab or lab mix that is known to be on the moderate energy level would be a good fit - ONLY if you can deal with the fur. labs shed, all year round. most people either accept the hair or ramp up the cleaning.

    a young lab will NEED an hour (sometimes more) of daily exercise - they are active dogs. you MIGHT be able to skip a day here and there (and by this I don't mean every week) but they need daily exercise.

    Not all labs/dogs love to fech. so while fetch is a great part of an execise routine they need more and some may not care to fetch much. And it cannot be a crtuch (I don't want to go to the dog park, play date, hike so I will throw the ball this week). Again, some dogs don't like fetch so then you really need to have other plans.

    labs also need training/mental stimulation (training, games, etxc.).

    If you are considering a lab PUPPY - that's another kettle of fish. they can be pretty rambunctious and need tons of training, patience, soialisation (this is very important) and patience. did I mention patience? And time? and Training? and some more patience? Do make sure to find the right breeder too, (if you go this route we can get into the detail sof how to find a breeder and what good breeders do)

    They need offleash free play during this time and cannot run with your husband until they are fully grown (18-24 months)
    Last edited by Tanya; 05-03-2013 at 07:39 AM.
    Charlie (foster) and Rocky

  11. #9
    BigBrownDog is offline Senior Member
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    I'm going to say no. Get a poodle. Labs need a LOT of exercise - more than chasing a stick or ball. Labs are prolific shedders. If you are house proud, a Lab is not for you.

    Get a poodle.
    Sharon, Blaise and Diesel.

  12. #10
    Tanya is offline Senior Member
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    also - size of the dog doesn't indicate if they "should or should not be" an indoor dog. I never understood this logic. Danes are not outside dogs by any means and they are much bigger than labs.

    Plus, no matter how big your house is, they will always be by your side anyway (under your feet even!) LOL
    Charlie (foster) and Rocky

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