Delayed Pigmentation?
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Thread: Delayed Pigmentation?

  1. #1
    Join Date
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    DefaultDelayed Pigmentation (and questions of genetics)?

    Has anyone had a Yellow Lab puppy that had delayed pigmentation? I have a Yellow Lab that is 8 weeks old. When I got her (at just 40 days old) she had almost no pigment around her eyes and on her nose so I thought she might be a "Dudley"... now it is coming in (Black not brown)... mostly this has come in this past week. She has black pigmentation around her mouth and under her feet. I read somewhere that some Yellow Labs don't have their full pigmentation until they are 14 weeks of age. Anyone experience this?

    Last edited by AsianLabs; 11-29-2009 at 03:31 PM. Reason: topic expanded

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  3. #2
    MicksMom is offline Senior Member
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    Yes. Caleb's pigment was slow coming in, too. We knew Caleb wasn't a dudley because his eyes weren't grey/green like the dudley we had in the past. Here he is at five weeks. You can see how his nose was darken up, but he still lacked pigment around his eyes.



    Four weeks later, the pigment was dark on his nose, but was still coming in around his eyes.

    The pigment eventually came in totally, but it didn't last- Caleb gets "snow nose" when it gets cooler, and I guess what you'd call "snow eye", since he loses pigment on his bottom eye lids in the winter, too.

  4. #3
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    Hmmm... just wondering... here is a hypothisis: Could it be that only the eeBb (and not the eeBB) have this delayed pigmentation and also may loose their pigmentation as they get older or in the winter ("snow nose" as they call it).

    If I am not mistaken, my puppy cannot be eebb, as she doesn't have any liver pigmentation... only black coming in slowly (at this age of 8 weeks).

    I've not tested my puppy's genetic makeup (whether she is eeBB or eeBb)... wonder if there is anyone out there who has tested and can verify my hypothesis.

    Here is a good website about Coat Color Genetics:
    http://abnormality.purpleflowers.net...s/breeding.htm

    Another thing I wondered about is if this could have to do with the so-called "undiscovered 'I'" (intensity) locust that is mentioned in the above mentioned site.

    This site states: "One further complication of Labrador genetics is the variation in the shade of yellow. This may be caused by the C locus, which is known to lighten coat colour in other animals, but some geneticists believe it's more likely that it's caused by a separate, as yet undiscovered locus, which they call I (for 'intensity'). This locus determines how intense the phaeomelanin (red) pigment is, and so determines whether a Labrador is white, yellow, gold or red."

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  6. #4
    Bob Pr. is offline Senior Member
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    Lab color genetics is an ongoing unravelling of some thigs known and some still mysteries. There seem to be multiple genes involved.

    But, in regard to your Lab's young age -- it be very good to expose her to multiple opportunities to play with other puppies (littermates would be best).

    Bess, my first Lab, we got at age 5 weeks and she came into our household without other dogs.

    As a result, as best I can tell, she never identified herself as a dog, never played with them; she consistently ignored them and if any persisted in running next to her, she gave them a body slam that sent them rolling.

    This is something for which there is a "critical period" (AKA sensitive period) for dogs to gain. See Scott & Fuller's book, "Genetics and the Social Behavior of Dogs," for more about this.

    Puff [YF, AKC field line (from competing HT/FT breeder) 62 lbs, dob: 8-'01]

    Bess [BF, AKC bench line (from competing show breeder) 55 lbs., 1967-1981] "Poor Bess, the Wonder Dog":
    http://forum.justlabradors.com/showt...?p=748#post748

  7. #5
    Bob Pr. is offline Senior Member
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    Lab color genetics is an ongoing unravelling of some thigs known and some still mysteries. There seem to be multiple genes involved.

    But, in regard to your Lab's young age -- it be very good to expose her to multiple opportunities to play with other puppies (littermates would be best).

    Bess, my first Lab, we got at age 5 weeks and she came into our household without other dogs.

    As a result, as best I can tell, she never identified herself as a dog, never played with them; she consistently ignored them and if any persisted in running next to her, she gave them a body slam that sent them rolling.

    This is something for which there is a "critical period" (AKA sensitive period) for dogs to gain. See Scott & Fuller's book, "Genetics and the Social Behavior of Dogs," for more about this.

    Puff [YF, AKC field line (from competing HT/FT breeder) 62 lbs, dob: 8-'01]

    Bess [BF, AKC bench line (from competing show breeder) 55 lbs., 1967-1981] "Poor Bess, the Wonder Dog":
    http://forum.justlabradors.com/showt...?p=748#post748

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