Labs and Children
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12

Thread: Labs and Children

  1. #1
    deidra's Avatar
    deidra is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    strasburg,il
    Posts
    6,716

    DefaultLabs and Children

    I don't know about anyone else but i have seen MANY people wondering about labs and children and how they cope. Generally I have found if a lab(or any dog) is well trained,exercised and the kids ALSO know how to behave around a dog they are really good together. Make sure your kids know how to behave around a dog. No touching the dog while eating, do not start jumping around the dog while he/she is sleeping. Do not pull on the dogs ear and tail or any other body parts. Do not get in the dogs face. Do not take toys or bones out of the dogs mouth. Now, the dogs have to be well trained also. Teach the dog leave it and how to be calm around kids. Leave it comes in handy with a whole bunch of toys that could get destroyed, food everywhere ect.. Make sure the dog is well exercised and NEVER EVER,EVER, EVER a million ever's left alone unsupervised with the kids. Anything could happen in a second. Even if the dog is very good with young children. Teach the kid and the dog to respect each other. Have the child involved in everything possible with the dog. Training,feeding, exercise ect if the kid is old enough. labs can easily knock over a small kid by accident. It is not on purpose they can get excited and be wiggling there buts so hard and the kid falls over.

    Here is a pic of my sister(7) My brothers(8 and 10) and my younger lab at the park today


    Im sure there is something I am forgetting at the moment so if anyone else wants to pitch in go ahead or post your pics
    ~It doesn't matter how smart the dog is,it matters how smart the owner is.

  2. Remove Advertisements
    JustLabradors.com
    Advertisements
     

  3. #2
    CindersMyGirl is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    3,209

    Default

    I disagree about the eating part. My dogs know that they can be touched while eating. Do my kids bother them? No. But in a busy household with many kids the odds are that your dog will be passed or rubbed against while eating or enjoying a treat. If they responded negatively they would lose whatever they had. It is unwise to teach a dog that they cannot be disturbed with food when you have kids.

    And my dogs know that if they have something in their mouth that they shouldn't they either drop it or I'm going in. Cinder drops anything you tell her to. She leaves anything you tell her to. The pugs aren't 100%.

    In my opinion it's a two way street. Teach your kids how to behave, but teach your dogs to be tolerant. Otherwise it's a recipe for disaster.

  4. #3
    deidra's Avatar
    deidra is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    strasburg,il
    Posts
    6,716

    Default

    yes,I agree they will be rubbed and bumped into. What I meant is getting right down in there face and rubbing all over them by their mouths. My dogs have been taught that they are not allowed to be food aggressive. There still animals though and will do animal things. Most dogs should no drop it,I agree. But what happens when you look away for just a second and the little kid goes in and takes a bone away and the dog gets possessive? I've taught all the kids that come into my house that they never take any bones out of a dogs mouth. All dogs are different and some kids don't know that while one dog may allow that the other dog won't. Of example my dogs yes, you can go up to them while eating but my uncles dog no. He is a loving dog but does not like people all over him while eating. So that is why i put that in there.
    ~It doesn't matter how smart the dog is,it matters how smart the owner is.

  5. Remove Advertisements
    JustLabradors.com
    Advertisements
     

  6. #4
    labby's Avatar
    labby is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    *points to her right palm*
    Posts
    29,548

    Default

    I agree with adults that they should be able to take anything out of the dog's mouths. However, young kids under 5? I don't believe they should be around the dog without supervision. Kids that young don't understand dogs and dog basics. Dogs don't normally see young children as humans. They tend to see them as littermates and consequently might growl or snarl if young children mess with them while they are eating.

    Kids have to learn boundaries the same as a dog. Dogs are not "on" 24/7 and when they are sleeping or eating they are left alone.....period.



    Laura





  7. #5
    MicksMom is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    8,330

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by labby View Post
    I agree with adults that they should be able to take anything out of the dog's mouths. However, young kids under 5? I don't believe they should be around the dog without supervision. Kids that young don't understand dogs and dog basics. Dogs don't normally see young children as humans. They tend to see them as littermates and consequently might growl or snarl if young children mess with them while they are eating.

    Kids have to learn boundaries the same as a dog. Dogs are not "on" 24/7 and when they are sleeping or eating they are left alone.....period.
    That's how it would be in a perfect world. Unfortunately, we don't live in a perfect world. And, because we don't, I've taught our dogs to be tolerant of poking fingers, ears and tails getting tugged, being bumped, hands in the food dishes, fingers in mouths, etc. Being out at festivals, parades, etc, I don't have to be worry about the non dog savvy family, or the enthusiastic child who comes running up to us or the toddler who pokes an ear before they can be stopped. Do I want these things happening to my dog? Of course not. But I know he's going to be fine if it happens. I can hoestly say, the worste Caleb would do is try to kiss the kids and jump up to get out of the way if his tail gets stepped on.

  8. #6
    kassabella's Avatar
    kassabella is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Wellington New Zealand
    Posts
    9,926

    Default

    I think there is a huge difference with dogs being in the same house as kids to ones visiting. Different situations, different dogs. Dogs in a house with kids you train then both. Kids who don't have dogs at home don't have those skills and very difficult to train a dog without kids around.

    My general rule is never leave kids alone with dogs.
    I think you need to know your dog and the children and make your decisions on that. I would never ever leave Gems for a second with kids

    When my 4 year old grand daughter or other friends small children are here visiting the rule is no child is left alone with them. Even older ones. No mater how well I have trained them. I know Erns is great with them and protects Emily following her around. She is allowed near Erns with me when he eats so both of them get used to it and not once has he even looked at her, but I will never leave her with them eating. I dont leave them alone eating.
    Tessa grew up with children so have no doubt she is great, but...there could be a time they get a fright, sick, in pain, or something and the dog nips, licks and people think it is a nip or kids hurt the dog more than they mean to.
    Out in public I had tight control of them and there are rules.

    It wasn't until I was taking a photo with Emily and Gems that it dawned on me she thought Emily was a litter mate. I asked Emily to sit closer. She mucked around and Gems wasn't happy so gave her the same warning lick she gave Erns when he did something she didn't like.

    .
    Last edited by kassabella; 02-21-2012 at 03:24 PM.

    Kassa 25/11/01 - 09/02/05 O.S Jaw cancer forever in my heart.
    Ernie 25/11/01 adopted May 05
    Sam 11? adopted Nov 06 - 18/12/07 Lyphoma
    Tessa. Rescued June 2011.
    Bone Cancer Dogs org.http://www.bonecancerdogs.org/
    http://kassabella.tripod.com/kassabella/
    http://collarsbychris.weebly.com/

  9. #7
    Luvmydog2much's Avatar
    Luvmydog2much is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Windsor Ontario
    Posts
    3,424

    Default

    Well, I trust my dogs a whole bunch, but I don't ask for trouble either. I have a 14 year old autistic nephew who doesn't understand that dogs don't like their teeth examined 26 times per visit or their privates touched. So my dogs need to be practically bomb proof. And they have been, but it only takes once.

    My dogs are proofed like CRAZY about feeding and kids, bones and kids, toys and kids, and I know that 99.99999999999999% of the time they will react as I predict and I love it. But the chance is always there that they may not, I know that...if I ever don't trust my dog around a child, it will be put down. There are too many chances given to dogs. A dog that doesn't do well with children has no place in society as a whole. What kind of life is that?

    If my dogs are reactive, they are not my dogs. I have held firm on this my whole life. I don't live with unpredictable dogs, and so I think its only fair that I over train them for those situations. We do a lot of work with autistic children and I love it, so I cannot compromise on their temperaments.

    Children cannot be expected to understand and comply with dog rules all of the time, so I expect my dogs to.

    Everyone loves dogs and kids pictures, but its a LOT of work to get here

    Last edited by Luvmydog2much; 02-21-2012 at 03:50 PM.
    'Don't grow up too quickly, lest you forget how much you love the beach.'
    ~ Michelle Held


    Rhys, Ruby and Nola

  10. #8
    mitziandjudysmom's Avatar
    mitziandjudysmom is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    NE Ohio
    Posts
    9,429

    Default

    I think the point Diedra is trying to make is that children should learn safe behavior with any dog...dogs encountered on the street, at friends' houses, at the dog park, etc. Not all dogs behave as well as well trained Labs. If kids approached my dogs on the street, the worst they would get is licked faces (like Caleb).
    But not necessarily true of all dogs. If parents don't teach their children, maybe a program at school could spare a lot of children of dog bites.

  11. #9
    deidra's Avatar
    deidra is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    strasburg,il
    Posts
    6,716

    Default

    Thank you,That is the point I was trying to get at. I walk a unpredictable dog. He can be sweet one minute but if someone moves up to him to fast he does flinch and has been known to nip. he was just very unsocialized and certain things scare him. We are working on it but there are some kids who will come running and I have to tell them to stop. All kids should no the rules. All dogs should no the rules......if only it was that way.
    ~It doesn't matter how smart the dog is,it matters how smart the owner is.

  12. #10
    blackandyellow is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Mexico City
    Posts
    1,989

    Default

    I think it has to be a combination. Kids need to be taught how to behave around dogs on the one hand, and on the other the dog also has to be socialized with kids and learn how to behave around them. I´ve seen too many kids abuse little dogs, and too many little dogs be snappy and intolerant to kids.

    My two Labs are awesome with kids even though they didn´t grow with them. I never leave them unattended with kids though, no matter what, but I admit I enjoy watching them interact with them, especially older kids (older than 7). I let kids play fetch with them, and I make sure they drop the ball (Homer is great, but Misha sometimes gets a hard mouth, which can scare kids)

    Little Vermont resulted also a magnet with kids, he immediately wanted to play with the two he has met.

    These dogs are fabulous with kids. My previous Labs were great too but they grew up with my nieces and the youngest even drank her bottle using Muffin as a pillow, but my Great Dane never warmed up to strangers, she was fine with kids and tolerated them but never wanted to play. My cocker was not kid friendly, though never aggressive either, she just didn´t like them. My parents shih tzu is also not good with kids, she´s too rough and not tolerant.



    But still, I never leave them alone

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Those that have Labs and young children....?
    By mamalamb in forum Lab Chat
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 02-20-2012, 11:39 AM
  2. Labs and small children
    By windycanyon in forum Lab Chat
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 11-18-2010, 08:50 PM
  3. Replies: 10
    Last Post: 08-19-2007, 07:50 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25