6 week puppy, to early to take home?
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Thread: 6 week puppy, to early to take home?

  1. #1
    WoodiE55 is offline Junior Member
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    Default6 week puppy, to early to take home?

    Is a 6 week old puppy to young to take home or should we wait another week?

    The couple that we're buying our lab from (this will be our 2nd lab) just called me and she they spoke to their vet and they have been told they could give the puppies their shots and be ready to pick up this weekend which would be the puppies 6th week. I'm wondering if this is to young to take a puppy home or not?

    I did speak to the owners over this last weekend and they said the puppies have been puppy chow food mixed with soft food and have been fine. That too concerned me a bit, but then again I don't know anything about breeding or the sort so I'm not sure if that's to early or out of the norm. I also get the impression that puppies probably are not around the mother all the time now either. So even if we waited till next week to pick her up I'm not all to sure what good it would do anyways.

    Really, I guess I'd say my main concern is that we're getting a healthy puppy. Would there be any serious issues if we took the puppy this weekend?

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  3. #2
    Sophiesmama's Avatar
    Sophiesmama is offline Senior Member
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    The puppy is too young. You should wait till he is 8 weeks. In some states it is illegal to take a puppy before 8 weeks. Even though they are eating food and are being weened. Puppies need their litter mates. They learn from them and their mother. Puppies taken too soon will likely be really bitey and mouthy. They learn from playing with siblings that being bit hurts! It sounds like you are getting your puppy from "owners" not a qualified breeder. Just be careful, you may not be getting clearances for eyes and hips, which could be very expensive down the road for you. Good luck with your new addition...but waiting till 8 weeks is best.
    ~Pam



    Sophie DOB 04/13/2011 6 mo


    8.5 mo.

    Sophie 15 months, with Skye

  4. #3
    Belles mom is offline Senior Member
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    In a word, YES, it is too early to take a pup home.

    There are a lot of other things to ask, but my iPad battery is about to go dead. I am sure you will hear from others on the board


    Karen and the gang
    BBI Kodi's Journey To Anotch (Journey)
    BBI Kodi's Blackpowder Striker (Flint)

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    georgie's Avatar
    georgie is offline Senior Member
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    It is too early. Even if they are weaned from their mom, they learn alot about being dogs from their littermates. Do the parents have clearences? Why do they want they pups to go to their homes at 6 weeks? These are very formative weeks for the puppies & they need to learn about dog behavior from their littermates & even their mom.

  7. #5
    Tanya is offline Senior Member
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    welcome to the board

    first - i believe I read that the shots at 6 weeks were useless and the new protocol is 8-12-16.

    second - i personally recommend you research what to look for in a breeder and question if this is how you want to get your puppy (and the answer may be yes, that is your call). if you want a healthy puppy you are best to go with a breeder that does their work, by ensuring both parents pass all their health clearances prior to the breeding (hips, elbows, eyes, heart, eic, cmn) and that works their dogs in a venue to prove them (conformation, obedience, field, hunt).

    third - wayyy too early. they want to get rid of them because now it becomes a lot of work to have puppies in the house (hopefully they are in the house) and more expensive as they have to buy more puppy food. they are eating and pooping and making more noise. it's ALOT of work. But it is VERY important that the litter remain TOGETHER to learn dog from one another.
    Charlie (foster) and Rocky

  8. #6
    Golfgirlrobin is offline Senior Member
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    A "Breeder" who will send a pup home at six weeks is liable to be taking shortcuts in other areas as well; I'd be very nervous about taking a puppy from somebody so uneducated about the relationship between mother and puppy that they'd do that.
    ____________________________________________

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  9. #7
    dweck's Avatar
    dweck is offline Senior Member
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    Walk away quietly but quickly.

    Continue your search for a quality dog.

    This timetable is a major red-flag.

    Kelrobin Cleveland Street Denizen, CGC, RN [Parker]

    "Dear George: Remember, no man is a failure who has friends. Thanks for the wings. Love, Clarence" -- IAWL Screenplay (1946)

  10. #8
    BigBrownDog is offline Senior Member
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    A big red flag to me is that these "breeders" need the (not very good) advice of their vet on when the puppies can be sent home. Responsible breeders would know that info before getting into breeding and have their own opinion on such things.

    I am assuming that this is a back yard (amateur) breeding? Did you get proof from the "breeder" that all health clearances have been done on both adults before breeding was considered? You may not be aware, but there are many genetic problems that can be present in a Lab and that dogs with these problems (which may not be visible in the individual adults to your eye) should simply NOT be bred. Similarly, Labs who are not excellent representatives of the breed (proved in some venue like hunt, field, show, obedience) should also not be bred. There are too many dogs dying daily in shelters (including purbred Labs) to add more "less than quality" animals to the world.

    This is not the kind of breeding I would be supporting by buying a puppy (if in fact the above qualifications were not met).
    Sharon, Blaise and Diesel.

  11. #9
    Luvmydog2much's Avatar
    Luvmydog2much is offline Senior Member
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    If all you are concerned about is a healthy puppy, find a puppy from a reputable breeder who screens for hips, elbows, eyes and heart...I guarantee this breeder will not even THINK to place that puppy at 6 weeks.
    'Don't grow up too quickly, lest you forget how much you love the beach.'
    ~ Michelle Held


    Rhys, Ruby and Nola

  12. #10
    jen124's Avatar
    jen124 is offline Senior Member
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    Way too young. They learn key social behavior from their litter mates at this point.
    Jen and the crew!

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