Puppy personalities within a well bred litter
Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Puppy personalities within a well bred litter

  1. #1
    pupmom is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    8

    DefaultPuppy personalities within a well bred litter

    Hi,

    We are going to be bringing home our new puppy in about 4 weeks now. Can hardly wait! Have done tons and tons of research for months, love the breeder, she is very well respected and the pups are well bred..NO worries there.

    My question is about the individual pups within this great litter. Of course I realize there are differing personalities, but should there be a huge difference in temperaments? Would any of them be a bad choice? Would the more cautious of the pups be a good choice for a quiet household (we want a mellow, quiet but not shy pup...once the pup grows up)?

    Breeder is really picking out the pup for us, so her input is very valued and trusted. But you hear the middle of the road puppy is the best and stay away from the more reserved pups and the most active . Nothing is certain as far as the puppy we are getting as yet, but I am just asking a general question.

    Thanks so much!!

  2. Remove Advertisements
    JustLabradors.com
    Advertisements
     

  3. #2
    labby's Avatar
    labby is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    *points to her right palm*
    Posts
    29,548

    Default

    Yes there can be a wide variety of personalities, just like a human family. Some puppies are extremely smart and learn to be quiet and reserved in order not to call attention to themselves. Calling attention to themselves means they can be brutally picked on by their littermates. So that shy retiring pup doesn't necessarily mean the pup is truly shy. This is why the breeder knowing and picking out the puppy for you is usually the best option. Plus, some puppies are more reserved with strangers, just like people. Once they get to know their people, they're usually fine.



    Laura





  4. #3
    pupmom is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    8

    Default

    Thanks so much! Just what I wanted to hear

  5. Remove Advertisements
    JustLabradors.com
    Advertisements
     

  6. #4
    blackandyellow is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Mexico City
    Posts
    1,989

    Default

    There are also some tests to see the pups reaction to several things, that let you know their personalities, like what they do when they are in a new environment, how they react to a noise, if they like to be held belly up, if they follow people or wander around, etc.

    When I picked Misha, she was the only puppy left in her litter with her brother, which the breeder kept. But he let me interact with both puppies, first each one on their own, then together so I could see her personality. I wanted an independent dog and she indeed was. Not so more anymore, but she´s still and independent thinker.

    With Homer I was offered two pups, same method (pre-selected by the breeder). I met the puppies individually and interacted with them. Homer immediately came to me and stayed with me instead of wandering off to investigate the place. He´s been my black shadow ever since. His yellow brother was more intense, more playful.

    The good thing about Labs is that WELL BRED ones have all great temperaments.

  7. #5
    pupmom is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by blackandyellow View Post
    The good thing about Labs is that WELL BRED ones have all great temperaments.
    Thanks...So I will not fear the more cautious pup like you would in a not-well-bred-litter, and he probably is in fact a very good fit for a quiet household... Oh my, I might add here that I can hardly wait to bring out pup home!!

  8. #6
    Dani's Avatar
    Dani is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Mt. Pleasant, MI
    Posts
    6,676

    Default

    I'm amused about the "well" bred thing. Yes, you have a breeder who cares about the breed and probably shows them, and does all of the proper clearances, etc. The whelping box is probably not out in the garage, they do a good job at properly socializing the pups, and they dont' go home until they are 8 weeks. The thing of it is, IMO, is that puppies in ALL litters have varying personalities. And while the basic personalities do exist when they leave a breeder's home at 8 weeks, the remainder of the dog's personality is going to be shaped by it's environment, training and people. I know of "well" bred puppies going to certain families with one personality and them becoming something totally different. Same goes for when I send out rescue dogs. A dog will leave my house exhibiting certain traits, but will do things in the new home because the new owners allow them to do so. A majority of behavioral issues come from the owners themselves, not the breeding of the dog.
    Dani, Rider & Rookie
    SHR Watson's Safari Rider, JH, WC, CL1-R, RA, CGC, TDI
    SHR Endeavor Put Me In Coach, RN, WC, CGC

    Member Since 6/2003

  9. #7
    Tanwen's Avatar
    Tanwen is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    I moved to Banbury in Oxfordshire in 1993,prior to that I llived in Birkenhead,Cheshire
    Posts
    804

    Default

    I've said it (many) times before...but our breeder matched Dinozzo and our family. She asked about the family set-up, why we wanted the dog (would he/she be for show/pet/working) among others things. She was so good at it, I only realized I was being assessed for suitability months afterwards.
    Trust your breeder, they know the pups' temperaments better than anyone else and will do their utmost to match up pup and family. Ours did an excellent job and simply couldn't be faulted.



  10. #8
    pupmom is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    8

    Default

    "A majority of behavioral issues come from the owners themselves, not the breeding of the dog."

    I am an experienced dog owner, and certainly plan on obedience...in fact, the pup is already enrolled for kindergarten after he gets home! But I DO think you have a much better chance to get a "stable-temperament" dog from a person who truly cares about the breed and is socializing them properly before they go to their forever home than an irresponsible breeder who probably does neither.

    My question was regarding the "basic personality" you suggest is already shaped by 8 weeks of age. I more than realize that the rest of it is up to me.

  11. #9
    BigBrownDog is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    11,990

    Default

    I wanted a mellow quieter dog and my breeder selected Blaise - and that is exactly what he is. He was pretty vocal in the litter, but also quite a slug - not the most active of the puppies - liked to lie there and complain.

    As an adult he is mellow, sweet, very affectionate, active when we go out - still a slug at home. His favorite thing is to snuggle up next to me on the couch - where he is right at the moment.

    Dani is right about temperament problems usually being caused by owners. Genetic temperament issues are exceptions - even in "not so well bred" dogs.
    Sharon, Blaise and Diesel.

  12. #10
    dedfish's Avatar
    dedfish is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    19

    Default

    I'm reading a new book by John Bradshaw called 'Dog Sense: How the New Science of Dog Behavior Can Make You a Better Friend to Your Pet'. In this book Bradshaw talks about how puppy personality tests conducted at 7 or 8 weeks of age don't really predict the puppies future personality and how at 7 or 8 weeks of age a puppies personality is at it's most malleable.
    Numerous scientific studies have failed to find any validity in "puppy testing" as a predictor of future character.
    As long as your comfortable with the breeder in general and how they socialize and raise the puppies you should not go wrong with any of the puppies. Their personality will still be very shape-able at this age it and be more dependent on how the breeder and you socialize and raise the puppy and how many new situations you introduce it to in a friendly manner.

Similar Threads

  1. Help please, is my yellow lab puppy a pure bred?
    By chiltonp in forum Lab Chat
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 02-19-2013, 11:53 AM
  2. Field Bred vs Conformation Bred for work
    By Deanna1002 in forum Obedience/Tracking
    Replies: 67
    Last Post: 04-19-2010, 09:44 PM
  3. Puppy (a litter) help - xpost from someone else
    By jzgrlduff in forum Lab Chat
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 06-04-2008, 10:08 AM
  4. Replies: 23
    Last Post: 08-06-2007, 09:35 AM
  5. Replies: 28
    Last Post: 06-02-2006, 07:15 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26