Help please- Jumping hurt someone
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Thread: Help please- Jumping hurt someone

  1. #1
    YukonsMom is offline Member
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    DefaultHelp please- Jumping hurt someone

    We have a jumping problem with our Yukon (who will be 2 in October). Putting our knee up doesn't phase him at all. Yesterday he ran across a field and jumped on the wife of my husband's friend. She was standing in front of a plow, banged into it and hurt her ribs. We can't risk this sort of thing happening again and are searching for training ideas. I've been googling and see one idea of holding his legs when he jumps to annoy him. Any thoughts or ideas would be greatly appreciated. I feel a little sick over this. The fact that he's a "nice" dog doesn't help her ribs Thanks.

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    Labradorable's Avatar
    Labradorable is offline Senior Member
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    That's a tough one. Start at home by keeping him on lead when people come over. Stand on the leash so he cannot jump up (long enough for him to be in a natural standing position) and do not allow anyone to pet him or talk to him until he is calm. If he tries to jump up say "off" or "down" or whatever command you choose. If he is off lead outside and starts jumping on people take away his freedom by putting him back on lead and doing the same thing. Praise when he sits still, correct when he jumps up.
    ~Samantha
    Dozer (04/01/09) & Moose (01/02/13)
    Cybil (02/02/00 - 02/20/09)



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    BigBrownDog is offline Senior Member
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    Has he been to obedience? Seems like he has more than just a jumping problem. I assume you tried to recall him when he was charging across the field towards your friend and he did not listen? Correct?

    Effectively training a dog starts with him listening to you and being responsive. I don't think you will be successful training to simply not jump if he is not under general control.

    And - he should not be off leash if he is not under general control.
    Sharon, Blaise and Diesel.

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    YukonsMom is offline Member
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    Thanks Samantha. I realize that we haven't tried taking away his freedom after he jumps. I think after he stops the jumping we've been letting him on his merry way and that's probably a big part of the problem.

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    Dexter Dogg is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigBrownDog View Post
    And - he should not be off leash if he is not under general control.
    This was my first thought.

    I was on a green yesterday playing frizbee with Dexter who is 2 1/2. He has pretty good recall but I still have him on a long line because of other people and the nearby road.

    Someone else joined us on the green and let there dog loose (not the first time). Well yesterday the dog ran off the green and into the road. A car almost hit him. Thankfully they managed to stop and he was not hurt.

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    YukonsMom is offline Member
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    Sharon, I think you're right about everything. I wasn't there yesterday (DH was) he takes Yukon over their house to play with their lab. I assume he thought the wife was more fun when he spotted her and ran up to her. He does not recall reliably when something more exciting is going on, but it's difficult to get him the exercise he needs without his off leash runs. I'll have to talk to my husband about this.

    I'll probably get clobbered for this, but do obedience classes really work? I'd have a lot of juggling of kids and money, but if it would be effective it's worth it.

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    dweck is offline Senior Member
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    This dog should NOT be offleash. Exhibit a) the lack of a reliable recall. Exhibit b) The jumping.

    And do obed classes work: Well, yes. Provided the owner/handler is committed to MAKING them work.

    Kelrobin Cleveland Street Denizen, CGC, RN [Parker]

    "Dear George: Remember, no man is a failure who has friends. Thanks for the wings. Love, Clarence" -- IAWL Screenplay (1946)

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    AngusFangus is offline Senior Member
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    Possibly the reason you have found kneeing in the chest to be ineffective is that even negative attention is still attention. Some dogs interpret kneeing as a form of play.

    Now: Why do you think dogs jump on people? It is almost always for one very simple reason: Attention. They are seeking the attention or inviting play with the target of their jumping. To knee them in the chest, hold their legs, or anything similar is only engaging in the game. I tried those too, and noticed that it only seemed to make the game more fun for Angus.

    The single most effective thing for jumping up that I have found is so simple, but incredibly powerful: Turn your back, fold your arms and become a tree. Do not talk, make eye contact, or move. When you do this you are saying, very clearly, in doggie body language, "I do not like this game and do not wish to play it with you." I have seen this simple thing work in two or three repetitions in obedience classes. They "get it" really fast, because it is presented in a language they can understand. As soon as all four feet are on the floor (or sitting, better yet), praise and reward. If this causes jumping up again, GREAT! It's another opportunity to drive the point home by turning around with arms crossed again. Repeat as necessary.

    Now: If your dog has been getting "rewarded" (inadvertently) for jumping for a while now, it may not be as simple as two or three tries. The behavior may actually get a little worse before it gets better. But I will guarantee you, if you and your entire family (EVERYONE has to be on board with this) are consistent about withdrawing attention the moment he jumps up, it will stop. If the behavior is no longer being rewarded, it will be extinguished.

    I will also add that turning away may or may not be enough to get the message across. With Angus, it wasn't. So we had to take it one step further by leaving the room and closing the door. Wait a few moments, return, he jumps again, repeat repeat repeat.

    I also agree with above that general obedience training will go a long way towards this and many other little issues.

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    BauersMom is offline Senior Member
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    Bauer (he was 2 in January) was a jumper too, but it was mostly with kids. This is what we did: I put him on a leash, and invited some of my son's friends over. I put Bauer in a sit, and had the kids come in the front door and greet him. If he jumped, they turned their backs and went back outside. Over, and over, and over . . . and over. Bauer learned pretty quickly that if he jumped, they weren't going to stay. He was still very excited, and it was obvious he needed an outlet for his excitement. I gave him a toy to hold while greeting, and this worked great. After much practice on-leash, we went to off-leash, and did the same thing over, and over, and over. He figured out that as soon as he jumped, people left. After we got over the "jumping" hurdle, we worked on "Place". If we are in the house and someone knocks on the door Bauer grabs a toy, and goes to his "place" (which is just at the end of the couch) and waits. When I tell him "Ok" he can leave his place and greet the person, he always does it with a toy in his mouth. When we are outside and someone drives up, he goes to his "Place" on the front porch and waits.

    Maybe someone else has a better solution, but this worked for us. It took a lot of time, practice, and patience; but it was worth it.
    Debi and Bauer
    Some people are like slinkies. Not really good for much, but bring a smile to your face when pushed down the stairs.


  12. #10
    AngusFangus is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by YukonsMom View Post
    I'll probably get clobbered for this, but do obedience classes really work? I'd have a lot of juggling of kids and money, but if it would be effective it's worth it.
    Obedience classes do work, but only if you do your homework. Don't expect to attend obedience classes for 8 weeks and have something magical happen. It is highly unlikely that at the end of 8 weeks you will have a perfect dog. Obedience is an ongoing process, and very much like what they say about muscles: If you don't use it, you lose it.

    What a good obedience class will do is teach you how to train your dog, and in a couple of 8-week sessions you can learn a lot about how to problem-solve and the basics of teaching a dog. Once a dog learns how to learn...you can teach them anything.

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