Developing character while raising a puppy
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Thread: Developing character while raising a puppy

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    Scout's Mom is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultDeveloping character while raising a puppy

    Scout's trainer came by for a visit yesterday. Scout was such a challenge. I feel embarrassed sometimes that people will think I don't train my dog, I do but he is extremely willful and energetic. My trainer has a dog just like Scout and she said that is exactly what she wanted a challenging lab. She said Scout is just a typical normal field type lab, but very smart and it will take about three years for him to really settle down. He just ate my brand new wallet this morning and so many other things, I hope I can afford him. He is a fanatic chewer.

    Anyway it was nice to know there wasn't a flaw with me or my dog, it is just his personality. He is a fun happy dog. Trainer noted my relationshiip with him is so much better and my patience has grown exponenetially. Didn't think about a dog helping me to develop more character and compassion but that is one of the fringe benefits I guess. I love my dog.

    Debbie
    Debbie (Scout's Mom)


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    erika348 is offline Junior Member
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    I have a very smart and energetic lab as well and just hang in there - it won't be 3 years. Guinness and I have been in obedience training and Rally O for a year now and he's doing so well. At 12 months he earned his CGC and placed 3rd in his first Rally O. He now just gets into "training mode" and calms down enough for me to work with him and he's only 1.5 years old now.

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    Luvmydog2much is offline Senior Member
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    I always tell new people at our classes to be prepared to be embarrassed, and then promptly tell them that in a few classes they'll have the smartest, most social dog in the class.

    You don't have a Golden, you don't have a Border Collie, you have a young, exuberant and energetic endearing Labrador. Embarrassment comes with the territory, glad you have a good trainer!
    'Don't grow up too quickly, lest you forget how much you love the beach.'
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    Labradorable is offline Senior Member
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    Sounds like Dozer. He is just a ball of energy. Our trainer thinks he's GREAT. He's smart, wants to learn and focuses well. He's just a puppy, and with persistence, consistency and a lot of patience he'll catch on ... so will Scout.
    ~Samantha
    Dozer (04/01/09) & Moose (01/02/13)
    Cybil (02/02/00 - 02/20/09)



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    Quote Originally Posted by Luvmydog2much View Post
    .

    You don't have a Golden, you don't have a Border Collie, you have a young, exuberant and energetic endearing Labrador. Embarrassment comes with the territory, glad you have a good trainer!

    have a mostly bc and a golden - and they cause me plenty of embarrassment - LOL - part of the turf of loving a dog imho - no matter the breed
    http://andrea-agilityaddict.blogspot.com/

    “I am only one, but still I am one. I cannot do everything, but still I can do something; and because I cannot do everything, I will not refuse to do something that I can do.” H. Keller

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    lisa's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scout's Mom View Post
    Scout's trainer came by for a visit yesterday. Scout was such a challenge. I feel embarrassed sometimes that people will think I don't train my dog, I do but he is extremely willful and energetic. My trainer has a dog just like Scout and she said that is exactly what she wanted a challenging lab. She said Scout is just a typical normal field type lab, but very smart and it will take about three years for him to really settle down. He just ate my brand new wallet this morning and so many other things, I hope I can afford him. He is a fanatic chewer.

    Anyway it was nice to know there wasn't a flaw with me or my dog, it is just his personality. He is a fun happy dog. Trainer noted my relationshiip with him is so much better and my patience has grown exponenetially. Didn't think about a dog helping me to develop more character and compassion but that is one of the fringe benefits I guess. I love my dog.

    Debbie
    Gracie is also a very excitable, loving dog with TONS of energy, more so than any other dog I have owned. She is still a chewer, but that is improving..except for the other day when she pulled my thermostat off the wall She is a year old now and she is starting to slow down a bit. Scout will be fine. You are right about the fringe benefits too

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    I would venture to say it may take 4-5 years. That's how long it took Abby to settle down. Slow down was at about 10 years.
    Susan
    Bayou Bay's Jeb's Trouble Too, RN, CGC

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    You don't have a Golden, you don't have a Border Collie, you have a young, exuberant and energetic endearing Labrador. Embarrassment comes with the territory, glad you have a good trainer!
    What do you mean?

    Deb, did he go back to his ways before he went away?



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    AngusFangus is offline Senior Member
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    I think I know what she means! Goldens and BCs have a lot of energy too, but are well-known for their ability to focus, or at least TRY to focus, to please their handler. They usually are the top scorers in trials. I think in almost every Open and Utility ribbon ceremony I've ever seen, there has been at least one Golden or Border Collie. Sometimes it's ALL Goldens and BCs. Seriously! Labs, OTOH...LOL! Wicked smart, every bit as smart as Goldens or Border Collies, but sometimes missing that, er, focus that it takes to be able to pull it all together in the ring. But never a dull moment with them!

    Debbie, I love your post. It reminds me so much of how I felt about Angus when he was a puppy. He was so horrible in classes sometimes - some of the things he did made me want to crawl into a crate and not come out until everyone left.

    You are so lucky to have a trainer who understands his personality and potential.

    I remember very early on, the night that Angus blew his first CGC attempt (in spite of being the smartest dog in the class...see "no focus" above...), I was very despondent. The evaluator said something to me I'll never forget. She said, "You know, I'd a lot rather have a dog like that, with a lot of drive, because if they don't have it naturally it's not really something you can give them."

    At the time I thought she must be truly insane. All I wanted was a nice, calm dog like other people had. A NORMAL dog. But now, I understand exactly what she meant.

    If I went to pick out another puppy tomorrow, I'd be looking for one just like Angus. Yes, it was terribly hard raising him...but I don't think it would be as hard the next time, because I'd know that a) he would eventually mellow and b) drive is a great thing when properly channeled.

    You sound like you have a much better attitude about this than I did in those days! LOL! I am glad you are already able to see it as a character-building experience. I didn't figure that out until much later.

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    I think I know what she means! Goldens and BCs have a lot of energy too, but are well-known for their ability to focus, or at least TRY to focus, to please their handler.
    Ohhhh, OK, that makes sense. I have one of the energetic Golden, but she is sooooo good with paying attention/focusing on me and what I am telling her.



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    Califon, NJ
    Hunterdon County
    "Each is a creature of Earth and is entitled to reside on it with dignity"

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