Dream coming true!
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Thread: Dream coming true!

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
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    DefaultDream coming true!

    Hi folks,

    I had my first dog between age 3-5, thereafter I never had a chance uptil now and I dont want to miss it. But now Im 38 and have a son, whos soon 7yrs old. We both have decided to get a puppy, we intend to gift it on my wifes birthday because she says I already deal with two and doesnt want the third

    I need some info and advise. The question thats bothering me most is, can the puppy stay alone for 8hours during the day? since I and my wife works and son goes to school. And the second question is, I live in an apartment and can spare one room about 9x6ft for the dog, is that much space enough?

    I have read the 'best advise' thread and hope to learn alot from it soon. But if theres anything in your opinion I should know.

    Also I know nothing about dogs except little what I have read here. I see many ads in news paper, private and from breeders, price ranging from 5k to 15k.

    Rigel


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  3. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    DefaultRe: Dream coming true!

    Quote Originally Posted by Rigel
    Hi folks,

    I had my first dog between age 3-5, thereafter I never had a chance uptil now and I dont want to miss it. But now Im 38 and have a son, whos soon 7yrs old. We both have decided to get a puppy, we intend to gift it on my wifes birthday because she says I already deal with two and doesnt want the third

    I need some info and advise. The question thats bothering me most is, can the puppy stay alone for 8hours during the day? since I and my wife works and son goes to school. And the second question is, I live in an apartment and can spare one room about 9x6ft for the dog, is that much space enough?

    I have read the 'best advise' thread and hope to learn alot from it soon. But if theres anything in your opinion I should know.

    Also I know nothing about dogs except little what I have read here. I see many ads in news paper, private and from breeders, price ranging from 5k to 15k.

    Rigel

    Hi There -

    Lots of questions here - you will get more replies in Lab Chat so you might want to post there too.

    Yes - you can successfully house a Lab in an apartment - but you should allow the dog to live with your family and not confine them to one room only - they are extremely social creatures and will be very unhappy confined all the time. I had a Collie/Lab cross in an apartment for several years - we walked her a LOT and she was a perfectly happy dog.

    No - you really cannot leave a puppy for 8 hours. It is workable if you can come home at lunch time and potty/play with the pup for a while or hire a dog sitter to stop by a couple of times a day. If that is not possible - consider getting an older dog (breeders often have older dogs/puppies available and rescue is a very good source for older dogs as well). By older - I mean 18 months - 2 years. Still very lively but not the challenge of a very small puppy.

    Not sure - but are you saying your wife is opposed to getting a dog - many responsible breeders and rescue will not allow a dog to go to a home where the entire family is not on board - it is a primary reason for dogs being given up. Speaking as a wife - you should not spring this one on her.

    Did you say 5K to 15K - as in 5 THOUSAND dollars? No - that is pretty high. I have not done anything but rescue in the last 20 years but I believe that $800.00 to $2000.00 is a typical price range depending on lines and where you live in the country. There are breeders on this board who can comment on that.

    Do not buy a puppy from a pet store, do not buy a puppy without seeing at least the mom, do not buy a puppy from someone who does not perform health and soundness testing on their breeding stock (and can show you the results) do not buy from someone who does not test their breeding stock in either field trials or conformation (which proves their worthiness to be bred as excellent examples of their breed), do not buy a puppy from someone who simultaneously breeds several different breeds of dogs - likely a puppy miller. Do not buy a "rare" silver lab. Do not buy a puppy younger than 8 weeks old. Do not buy a puppy from someone who does not screen you - they don't care very much about their puppies and they should not be supported. You have a lot of research to do to make this a wise purchase - you can get a whole lot of good info here!

    Good luck!


  4. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
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    DefaultRe: Dream coming true!

    Lots of questions here - you will get more replies in Lab Chat so you might want to post there too.
    Hello again, thankyou I will try this place.

    Yes - you can successfully house a Lab in an apartment - but you should allow the dog to live with your family and not confine them to one room only - they are extremely social creatures and will be very unhappy confined all the time. I had a Collie/Lab cross in an apartment for several years - we walked her a LOT and she was a perfectly happy dog.
    This is good news that I can house Lab in my apartment. Offcouse the puppy will spend all the time with us, but what I meant was to give 'puppy' a seperate room, with his bed and other stuff. specially for time when nobody is home.

    No - you really cannot leave a puppy for 8 hours.
    :no: :no: :no: this is exactly what I had in mind.

    It is workable if you can come home at lunch time and potty/play with the pup for a while or hire a dog sitter to stop by a couple of times a day.
    This is a good idea, but for how long should a sitter be required, suppose the puppy is 10wks old ?

    If that is not possible - consider getting an older dog (breeders often have older dogs/puppies available and rescue is a very good source for older dogs as well). By older - I mean 18 months - 2 years. Still very lively but not the challenge of a very small puppy.
    I wish a small puppy becasue I dont want to miss the fun in early age. Offcourse that means hell lot of work, but Im prepared for it.

    Not sure - but are you saying your wife is opposed to getting a dog- many responsible breeders and rescue will not allow a dog to go to a home where the entire family is not on board - it is a primary reason for dogs being given up. Speaking as a wife - you should not spring this one on her.
    Nei my wife doesnot oppose, but sorry to say as all women shes little skeptic ''if her hubby can handle it'' lol!!!!!!!! otherwise you see, I liked 'german-shepard' since long and maybe because there was this dog on tv program 'Run Joe Run' that made me liked 'GS' but it is my wife who told me about Labs and from last 2 years Im reading about them off and on. And just yesterday I started posting, if all goes well then by december I will hopefully have a puppy.
    Did you say 5K to 15K - as in 5 THOUSAND dollars? No - that is pretty high. I have not done anything but rescue in the last 20 years but I believe that $800.00 to $2000.00 is a typical price range depending on lines and where you live in the country. There are breeders on this board who can comment on that.
    Opps! I should had mentioned it before. Im from Oslo, Norway. My 5k is approx 1000 us$

    Do not buy a puppy from a pet store, do not buy a puppy without seeing at least the mom, do not buy a puppy from someone who does not perform health and soundness testing on their breeding stock (and can show you the results) do not buy from someone who does not test their breeding stock in either field trials or conformation (which proves their worthiness to be bred as excellent examples of their breed), do not buy a puppy from someone who simultaneously breeds several different breeds of dogs - likely a puppy miller. Do not buy a "rare" silver lab. Do not buy a puppy younger than 8 weeks old. Do not buy a puppy from someone who does not screen you - they don't care very much about their puppies and they should not be supported. You have a lot of research to do to make this a wise purchase - you can get a whole lot of good info here!
    Hmmm! do not, do not, do not, do noooooooooooooooooooooooooot. Oh God! this is just the beginning, what happens when we will have a puppy

    Anyway thank you for your comments.

    Rigel

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  6. #4
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    sarah is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: Dream coming true!

    Welcome to the forum and thank you for doing some research before getting your puppy!!

    Everything BBD said is correct... as for the sitter you would want someone there to let puppy out to the toilet, interact with the puppy, fill up water bowls and/or replace frozen kong, puzzle toy etc to keep the puppy entertained. I would assume for a 10 week old puppy that would be about 1/2 hour? That would allow 15 minutes of decent playtime to wear your puppy out, toilet time (can sometimes take awhile) as well as the other activities I listed.

    Post more questions in Lab Chat before you decide - ask any question you can think of. No question is a stupid question, especially if the end result is a little canine companion that will be around for 10+ years!! You want to get all your facts straight!!

    Why isn't your wife interested in a puppy? And what made you choose the Labrador breed?

    cheers
    Sarah
    Sarah & Milly - Sydney Australia






  7. #5
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    DefaultRe: Dream coming true!

    Quote Originally Posted by Rigel
    Do not buy a puppy from a pet store, do not buy a puppy without seeing at least the mom, do not buy a puppy from someone who does not perform health and soundness testing on their breeding stock (and can show you the results) do not buy from someone who does not test their breeding stock in either field trials or conformation (which proves their worthiness to be bred as excellent examples of their breed), do not buy a puppy from someone who simultaneously breeds several different breeds of dogs - likely a puppy miller. Do not buy a "rare" silver lab. Do not buy a puppy younger than 8 weeks old. Do not buy a puppy from someone who does not screen you - they don't care very much about their puppies and they should not be supported. You have a lot of research to do to make this a wise purchase - you can get a whole lot of good info here!
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Hmmm! do not, do not, do not, do noooooooooooooooooooooooooot. Oh God! this is just the beginning, what happens when we will have a puppy

    Anyway thank you for your comments.

    Rigel
    Not trying to ruin your fun here Rigel - but all those "don'ts" are mistakes that novice dog owners often make which they then regret when they know better. If you choose not to heed good advice, things may work out just fine - or you might wind up with a puppy that needs lifetime medical support or has temperament problems. Since this is an investment, as Sarah says, in a new family member who will be (hopefully) with you for a decade or more - a little prudent research into the breeder will save you money and regret down the road.

    Voice of experience here - the rescue I have now (who I love dearly) is a very young dog with diabetes. Very rare condition in such a young animal. If you are buying a dog from a reputable breeder with generations of health info on their dogs, you will have a lower risk of incidence of these kinds of issues. The cost of care for a dog with long term medical issues can be daunting.

    If you heed the advice you get here you will have a better experience with getting and raising a puppy - or you can ignore it and roll the dice.

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