Sit to the flush seminar.
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Thread: Sit to the flush seminar.

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    georgie's Avatar
    georgie is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultSit to the flush seminar.

    Took the girls to a sit to the flush seminar today. Kate needs work with live birds. She was really good up until a chukar in a harness was walked by her. Almost took my arm out of the socket. But she didn't get it so it was good training. She was pretty quiet also up until that point. I see we have a lot of work ahead of us before she starts master level tests.

    Abby, well, Abby is miss "steady eddie" and used to all of this. I think they both had a good day. We could have done some more trainng but it got too hot by afternoon.
    Last edited by georgie; 08-26-2012 at 07:07 PM.

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    gundog is offline Senior Member
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    Sounds like fun. Of course any training day is fun.

    I don't teach steady to wing....shot or fall but in some instances (Like how you use your dogs and the games they play) I understand how important it is.......and face it.....it's pretty cool when they are locked down and focused just waiting for the whisper that sends them.
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    It is fun training, Chuck. We run NAHRA hunt tests & they must sit to the flush & if the bird is hit, they must sit until released. If there is a fly away, they must sit and then return to heel or be released & start to quarter the field again. Besides duck hunting, the girls also do upland hunting & I just feel better (safer for the dogs) to be sitting when the bird flushes & is not released till it is shot. Any day with the dogs in the field is a good day.

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    hark67 is offline Senior Member
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    How cool! Once Guthrie passes his hunter title I guess we will have to tackle the upland part! It does not sound easy....hope there will be a seminar we can attend....we are gonna need a lot of help!

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    Megan, you have such great members in your club, you will get lots of help. Guthrie will do fine. He is a natural.

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    gundog is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by georgie View Post
    It is fun training, Chuck. We run NAHRA hunt tests & they must sit to the flush & if the bird is hit, they must sit until released. If there is a fly away, they must sit and then return to heel or be released & start to quarter the field again. Besides duck hunting, the girls also do upland hunting & I just feel better (safer for the dogs) to be sitting when the bird flushes & is not released till it is shot. Any day with the dogs in the field is a good day.
    All I do is upland......but I find that a sitting dog has a harder time catching cripples and also marking downed grouse. One bounce (the bird) and then the dog is there works best. If you talk to pheasant hunters on the prairie.....those birds will outrun a dog even when wounded.....if the dog is waiting to be released you will lose more of those birds.

    ........but there is a cardinal rule. NO LOW BIRDS. No shooting at low birds. Anyone hunting with me gets the speech....and a very serious threat of bodily harm. If you can't see sky under the bird you don't shoot.

    If you shoot you are done and I will not hunt with you.....ever again. If you shoot my dog you will go home in an ambulance.

    Then I smile and remind them that one bird is not worth any of that.....and we'll find plenty of birds so don't worry about it.
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    Well Chuck, you could shoot over my girls anytime & just ask my husband.....I don't let just anyone shoot over them.

    It's all about saftey in the field. DH & Abby are getting ready for their trip to Manitoba at the end of the month. So we mix it up, duck hunting & pheasant. Not too many grouse left in PA. At least we haven't seen too many.

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    Deacon was steady to the flush...eventually. And Diesel will probably be the same. Otherwise, I use the same horizon rule, about seeing sky under the bird...and the same threat. Since I'm a pheasant hunter, yeah...I want my dog to be right there when that bird hits the ground. I lost one last year, on opening day, when Diesel was behind me when I flushed it. I was reloading and saw his legs were going before he hit. By the time we got there, he was headed for the next county. Pheasant can take a lot to kill.
    My Lab is smarter than your honor student.

    Deacon 12/1/1999-4/2/2012 RIP, bestest boy.
    Diesel 3/29/2010 My little hard charger.


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    gundog is offline Senior Member
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    A natural way to break your dog from chasing flushed birds (well if you can't go the the prairie and put him on a few hundred birds in a weekend which works best) is to do the next best thing.

    I'll plant some good flyers.....chukars or pigeons have him flush and let him chase. While he's gone I'll plant another......I'll keep him running as long as possible on birds he can't catch. I'll throw them right out of my hands if i need to. A bag with a dozen pigeons.....done a few times takes that chase right out of them. When he stops chasing I'll tell him "no bird"......soon after all you need is to say no bird and he will stop.

    Don't let him see those birds come down and give him a chance to catch them though.....or you will teach him the opposite. They need to be good flyers.


    ....and yes they will usually know the difference between a wounded or dead bird coming down and one just flying out of the county.
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    slackercodemonkey is offline Senior Member
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    That is awesome. It sounds like so much fun training your dog.

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