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Thread: Clearances and Breeding Decisions

  1. #11
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    DefaultRe: Clearances and Breeding Decisions

    I am just a pet owner but I found your post very informative. Thanks for taking the time to explain the process and everything that goes into it.

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  3. #12
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    DefaultRe: Clearances and Breeding Decisions

    Quote Originally Posted by luvmydogz2much

    So along with clearances, I say the temperment of the dog is priority. No nice temperment, no breeding. Period. More important to me than a TVD carrier 4 generations back.
    In this thread along with the other, it was mentioned "TVD Carrier". Because of the mode of inheritance we need to be very carefully labeling any dog as a carrier of this serious condition. It is generally thought of as an autosomal dominant, incomplete penetrance which means it only takes one parent to throw a case. It is very possible for a heavily used stud dog to sire a case or two over all these litters and not be affected clinically or otherwise themselves.
    In addition, unless you know SPECIFICALLY of the case in question, unless the owner has taken the dog to a canine cardiologist, had an echo done, and you saw the diagnoses, you are dealing with only a rumor.

  4. #13
    Fallriver's Avatar
    Fallriver is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: Clearances and Breeding Decisions

    I think I understand this (I've heard others say similar things), but I assume you'd want the bitch to be free of the problems the stud might have, making it impossible to produce anything worse than a carrier? Or are there certain cases where it is worth the risk of producing a dog that is affected (with something - not EIC in particular).
    The only one that I personally would intentionally double up on I suppose is HD only because often it can be suspected to be more environmental than genetic in presentation. There are some minor eye issues such as dystichia or maybe dentition that maybe might be overlooked because they will not affect quality of life for the puppies, but it depends on the breeder entirely.
    For the most part, we need to start by knowing what problems we know our bitches are capable of producing (ie, elbows, cataracts), and start by finding a stud who is hopefully not producing it. Things like HD and ED are a matter of degree and not as easy as affected/carrier and careful research on siblings and offspring is necessary.

    Merry Christmas all and thanks for trying to see things from our point of view. We're not the bad guys, we are trying our very, very best to breed the best pups we can
    Dana


    To err is human:To forgive, canine."
    - Anonymous

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  6. #14
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    labby is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: Clearances and Breeding Decisions

    Just to expand on what Gregg said, a dog can pass its heart clearance and still pass it on, just like hips/elbows. We don't know the mode of inheritance with TVD, so we don't know if it's recessive where it takes both parents.

    There are certain dogs I won't double up on and have been warned not to double up on, but until we know the mode of inheritance or have that gene test we're just guessing just like we did before the Optigen test.



    Laura





  7. #15
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    Fallriver is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: Clearances and Breeding Decisions

    Thanks Laura and Gregg. That is what makes TVD so scary for our breed right now. There are a handful of dogs that I know have produced it and I do try to avoid them until we have a better handle on the mode of inheritance (if you haven't already, please give to the TVD research that is currenly ongoing). These dogs may not be purely responsible, but because it is a serious health concern that can skip several generations, I don't feel comfortable working with some lines (although it can sometimes happen in pedigrees where you scratch your head trying to figure out where on earth it came from). It does really limit my choices, especially with dogs on the west coast, but everybody has to work within their own comfort level.
    TVD and epilepsy are two biggies for me...I don't want to go anywhere near them because they can really affect quality and length of life and because the mode of inheritance is so questionable. Very scary diseases IMO.
    Dana


    To err is human:To forgive, canine."
    - Anonymous

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